07/23/14 3:00pm

1987 Flatbush Avenue, Midwood Trust, BATC 1

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Midwood Trust Company, now Chase Bank
Address: 1984 Flatbush Avenue
Cross Streets: Corner Flatlands Avenue
Neighborhood: Flatlands
Year Built: 1926
Architectural Style: Flemish Renaissance Revival
Architect: Slee & Bryson
Other Buildings by Architect: Colonial Revival and Tudor Revival homes and apartment buildings in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Crown Heights North and South, Park Slope and various parts of Flatbush, including Prospect Park South, Albemarle and Kenmore Terraces, and Ditmas Park.
Landmarked: No, but should be

The story: Our city’s Dutch ancestry is most often represented by the streets and neighborhoods now bearing the surnames of the many Dutch families who settled throughout Brooklyn. Now and again, we also see buildings that draw on the famous Dutch gabled farmhouses that managed to survive over the centuries. And then we have these wonderful examples of Flemish-inspired architecture that are so quintessentially Brooklyn and Dutch. They come from Flanders, that part of the Low Countries that was part of France, and is now part of Belgium, yet culturally still part of the Netherlands.

Lots of late 19th century architects were inspired by the distinctive ziggurat shaped stepped gables of the Flemish Renaissance period. These simple but elegant facades graced the townhouses, guild halls and commercial buildings of the Netherlands for centuries. When the Dutch came to New Netherlands, they brought their architecture with them, and these shapes turn up throughout the Hudson Valley and in and around New York City, Long Island and New Jersey. (more…)

07/23/14 2:00pm

138-north-8th-street-2-072314

The folks behind well-known sushi temple BondSt on Bond Street in Manhattan are set to open a new Japanese restaurant at 138 North 8th Street in Williamsburg this week. Cherry Izakaya started serving invite-only guests Tuesday and plans to open to the public Friday.

The contemporary menu will include small and large plates such as donburi escargot with miso béchamel, short ribs, and stuffed calamari with chorizo black rice. There will be sake, beer and and shochu-based cocktails. GMAP

Photo by Cherry Izakaya

07/23/14 1:30pm

384 vanderbilt avenue fort greene 72014

The Fort Greene house with radiant heat controlled by an iPad we told you about last month is now on the market. Renovated by Stuyvesant Group, it is unusually luxurious even for a high-end renovation and has an open floor plan, a double height kitchen in the rear of the parlor floor, marble counters and slabs of marble on the walls in the kitchen, and a high-efficiency boiler.

The house was a shell so there were no details to save, developer Adam Cohen told us, but he purchased three salvage pier mirrors and now one of them conceals a TV behind smoked glass. It’s set up as a triplex over a garden rental. We suspect this will go quickly at $3,500,000. What do you think?

384 Vanderbilt Avenue [Halstead] GMAP

71 stuyvesant avenue bed stuy

A tipster tells us that a three-story multifamily at 71 Stuyvesant Avenue in Bed Stuy has sold for $3,800,000, setting a new record for multifamily buildings in the neighborhood. The property last changed hands for $540,000 in 2010, after selling at a foreclosure auction a few months before, according to public records. The 6,200-square-foot apartment house has 12 units and sits near the corner of Stuyvesant and Dekalb Avenues. Until now, the most expensive multifamily sale was 281 Tompkins Avenue, which sold for $3,300,000 in January 2013.

Photo by Christopher for PropertyShark

07/23/14 11:30am

Brownstoner July Column pictures

Whether you just bought a house that was sitting empty for months (or years) or have concentrated on the inside, giving the outside (maybe) a little bit of love once a year, there will come a time when you step out, look at your yard and get somewhat consterned. Bald spots, weed lots, crazy vines, muddy puddles may seem like plant problems, but they are often caused by poor hardscape choices that make maintenance a difficult and lengthy, sometimes impossible, chore.

The first step is to assess recurring issues: Does it leak into your basement every time it rains heavily? Do the plants in that one corner look sickly and die, year after year? Do you never use the steps of a path but rather cut across a planted area, tracking mud in the house? Does weeding take entire weekends that merge into Sisyphean labor? These are all design problems.
(more…)

07/23/14 10:45am

carlo scissura hot seat 2

Welcome to the Hot Seat, where we interview people involved in real estate, architecture, development and design. In honor of the Brooklyn Building Awards, we talked with Carlo Scissura, president and CEO of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, which is hosting the awards at the Williamsburgh Savings Bank tonight.

Brownstoner: Where do you live, and how did you end up there?

Carlo Scissura: I currently live in Bensonhurst, the neighborhood I grew up in! I just bought a house in Dyker Heights and will be moving there in the fall. I chose Dyker because it is close to where I grew up, it’s a great community, lots of mom and pop businesses, open space, and close to transportation. It’s a classic New York City neighborhood, with a mix of old and new. (more…)

07/23/14 10:00am

williamsburg-apartment-buildings-070114

The ironies of the Mayor’s housing plan are piling up as high as a waterfront luxury skyscraper. Despite the populist rhetoric, the mayor’s plan to build more affordable housing in Brooklyn is a recipe for more development much like Bloomberg’s and will likely accelerate the gentrification of the few low-income neighborhoods still left in Brooklyn, was the conclusion of a deep dive into the subject matter on Gothamist.

Long-time residents of Cypress Hills, East New York, the Atlantic Avenue corridor and other low-income areas targeted by the mayor for rezoning and more affordable housing will not be able to afford these new “affordable” developments, the story concluded. (more…)

07/23/14 9:30am

The Brooklyn building boom has finally unleashed a slew of new-development condos: The total number of new-development sponsor sales throughout Brooklyn shot up a whopping 84.5 percent in the second quarter vs. the first. Median sales prices for new-development condos increased 19 percent, while the median per square foot jumped 24 percent in the period, according to a report out Friday from real estate firm MNS.

No neighborhood is hotter than Williamsburg, where the median sales price for new developments shot up 52 percent, from $821 per square foot to $1,244 per square foot in the second quarter vs. the quarter before, as DNAinfo was the first to report. The median sale price for a new-development condo in Williamsburg is now $1,770,000. (more…)