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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

You think you know every inch of Brooklyn. But seeing Brooklyn on foot, bike, or by car are not the only ways to explore the borough.

Viewing its shores from Jamaica Bay by kayak treats you to the unbelievable sights and sounds of Brooklyn’s beautiful wetlands. The Fresh Creek Nature Preserve, for example, is a 42-acre salt marsh where more than 300 species of birds, 50 species of butterflies and 100 species of fish live in an untouched natural habitat.

Marine Park, Bergen Beach, and Paerdegat Basin call Jamaica Bay and the Gateway National Recreation Area home, which includes 9,000 acres of marshes, ponds, islands and beaches. And these kayak water trails in Brooklyn will bring you within shoreline distance of Canarsie Pol, White Island, Yellow Bar and other island reefs in Jamaica Bay to explore.

Photo courtesy of NYC Department of Parks and Recreation.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Kosciusko Pool | Amanda B. via Foursquare

For generations, Brooklyn’s outdoor pools have been providing just the right amount of chill to take away the summertime blues. This year, the facilities open June 27. For information about swim lessons available for those of all ages, to learn which city pools are handicap accessible, or to find out about lap swimming, visit the NYC Parks Department.

The Kosciuszko Pool (Bedford-Stuyvesant)
The Kosciusko Pool, located at Marcy Avenue and Kosciusko Street in Bedford-Stuyvesant, was designed by Bed-Stuy native Morris Lapidus (1902-2001). Its spacious dimensions (230 feet long by 100 feet wide) and adjacent wading pool make it a favorite for Kings County families. Pool hours are from 11:00 a.m. through 7:00 p.m., with a break for pool cleaning between 3:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Even though they’ve been gone since 1957, it’s hard to get more Brooklyn than the Brooklyn Dodgers. Take a little trip into history with us to find out how the Dodgers began, what they did when they were here, and how we lost them.

Starting out as the less snazzily named Brooklyn Grays in 1883, the team was founded by real estate mogul and baseball fan Charles Byrne, Their first home was Washington Park on 5th Avenue in Park Slope. After winning the American Association league championship in 1889, they moved to the National League and promptly won that championship as well, the only team to win back-to-back in both leagues. Their success only grew as they took on players from teams that had folded.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.


The Revolutionary War makes many think of New England, but a number of significant battles actually happened throughout New York. Brooklyn, in particular, was home to many historic war sites, buildings and battles, many of which have been memorialized. For Memorial Day weekend, we present these five Brooklyn Revolutionary War sites that are worth the visit for any history buff, or any Brooklynite who had no idea how monumental a role the area played in the war.

Map of the Battle of Long Island courtesy of the Library of Congress via mountvernon.org.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

7 Middagh Street via Ephemeral New York

Carson McCullersW. H. AudenPaul and Jane Bowles. From 1940 to 1941, these literary giants lived together in a funny little mock-Tudor brownstone at 7 Middagh Street in Brooklyn Heights. And that’s not all: Lotte Lenya and Kurt WeillBenjamin Britten, two adult children of Thomas Mann, and (wait for it) Gypsy Rose Lee. So how exactly did this artistic dormitory experiment come to be, and why didn’t it last?

The venture was the brain-child of George Davis, an editor for Harper’s Bazaar and later Mademoiselle. Davis rented the house with Carson McCullers, the waifish Georgian novelist who had just burst onto the literary scene at 23 with The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. Next came Auden, the Bowles, Britten, and the others.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

If you live in Brooklyn, you’re used to seeing the signs up on telephone poles, letting you know that your street is going to be blocked off for a shoot.Thanks to its historic neighborhoods and its wealth of architectural styles, Brooklyn is a favorite for location shoots, both contemporary and period.

So it’s not surprising that Brooklyn ends up on television a lot. If you’re binge-watching one of these series on Hulu or Netflix, keep your eye out for one of your favorite Brooklyn landmarks.

 

In The Americans, FX’s Reagan-era KGB couple Phillip and Elizabeth Jennings (played by Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell) play Soviet spies pretending to be an American couple, while juggling relationships with their kids and neighbors. The award-winning show is set in Washington, DC, but many parts of Brooklyn double for the capital.

In Season 3 The Jennings walk on a snowy Cadman Plaza Park on the edge of Brooklyn Heights. (Tillary to Cranberry Streets, Cadman Plaza East to West). In another episode, Carroll Park is the setting where Elizabeth Jennings spies on Kimberly Breland (Julia Garner), the daughter of a US government official in the show. Elizabeth Jennings also trains a young South African in spycraft while walking on Hicks street between Cranberry and Orange.

The Americans shooting at Cadman Plaza Park photo courtesy of DNAinfo via FX Networks.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

 

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden (BBG) boasts over 10,000 different varieties of plants over its 52 acres. Whether it’s your goal to enjoy as many as possible or seek out a specific few, make the most of your visit by learning what will be blooming when. Read on to see what you can expect to see in each season.

The plant with the longest blooming time at the garden are orchids, and you can find them in the Robert W. Wilson Aquatic House, from February through September. Just after that comes native wildflowers, which can be seen from April through October.

 

 

South African bulbs are next, blooming from January through August, although you won’t see them in May or June. The witch-hazels are another hardy bunch, and you can see them from January through April. 

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

No doubt about it, Brooklyn’s Smorgasburg is the place to be if you’re hungry. Weekends from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Saturdays in Williamsburg and Sundays at Pier 5 in Brooklyn Bridge Park), you can choose from over 100 food vendors. The only hard parts will be deciding how much you can eat, and where to get it. Read on for ten of the vendors who will be vying for your taste buds.

Batter and Cream
Tired of mini-cupcakes yet? Three words: Homemade. Whoopie. Pies. Featuring unexpected flavors (raspberry cakes and green tea filling) as well as traditional (carrot cake and cream cheese), make sure to save some room for a decadent dessert from founder and native New Yorker Elizabeth Fife.

Butter and Cream photo courtesy of Facebook.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.
Brooklyn’s image has evolved drastically over the years, and nowhere is this more apparent than in its portrayal on celluloid. Manhattan can have its Breakfast at Tiffany’s glamour—Kings County is the site of gritty urban classics, many shot right here on the mean streets (that aren’t so mean anymore). Here are some classic local filming locations you can pay a visit to yourself.

Saturday Night Fever (1977)
Who can forget a young John Travolta’s strut down the sidewalk to the groovy beat of the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive?” That iconic opening shot was filmed on 86th Street in Bensonhurst, a South Brooklyn neighborhood that has retained much of its Italian-American character. You can even grab a slice at the same spot Tony Manero did, Lenny’s Pizza. Just be careful not to drop any tomato sauce on your disco boots.
Where to go: Lenny’s Pizza, 86th St. at 20th Ave.