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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Sometimes life calls for pie. Luckily for us, the borough is a great place to indulge. Many of New York’s best pie shops are right here in Kings County. Some have been around for years—others are the result of a more recent pie renaissance. Below are five stellar pie shops that will make your dessert dreams come true. What are your favorites?

Four & Twenty Blackbirds
Opened by Emily and Melissa Elsen, two sisters from rural South Dakota, Four & Twenty Blackbirds has been serving up handmade pies in Gowanus since 2010. Their seasonally inspired treats quickly gained a loyal following. Their pies are made from local and organic ingredients and often come in unexpected flavors such as chocolate julep (mint + bourbon + chocolate). Can’t decide what to order? The black bottom oat pie is a cult favorite.

Four & Twenty Blackbirds by Vikram S. via Foursquare.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Blame it on the Dutch. Brooklyn is awash in place names that are hard to wrap your tongue around. Read on for the origins and most common pronunciation of each. How do you pronounce these Brooklyn place names?

NEW UTRECHT AVE
Origin: New Utrecht, named for the Dutch city of Utrecht, was one of six towns that was incorporated into Kings County
Pronounced: YOO-trek

Sunset Park photo by The AllNite Images via Flickr.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

While Brooklyn is a place of constant flux, the savvy Brooklynite knows where to find remnants of its historical past. Here are five historic Brooklyn buildings that are still standing, despite the incredible changes that are happening all around them.

Brooklyn Borough Hall
Opened in 1851, Brooklyn Borough Hall was originally the City Hall of the former City of Brooklyn, before it was a part of New York City. In 1898, the consolidation went into effect, and this impressive Greek Revival structure became known as Borough Hall. It still houses the offices of the Borough President today and is protected as a New York City landmark.

Read more about Brooklyn Borough Hall here.

Photo by Wally Gobetz via Flickr.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

The Renegade Craft Fair (Greenpoint) [GMAP]
Hours: September 11 12—5 p.m.,  September 12—13 11 a.m.—6 p.m.

Hop on over to The Renegade Craft Fair for a variety of pop-up shops featuring artisanal and home-made crafts, clothing, jewelry, and more. Keep an eye out for some of our favorites including Hill & Velez Home Goods and clay jewelry by Melissa Diaz of Okru.

Renegade Craft Fair photo by Kaspar Metz.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

There’s no denying that Brooklyn is one of the most important immigrant destinations in the entire country. For decades, this borough was where immigrants arrived straight from Ellis Island, earning Brooklyn the moniker of “America’s hometown.”

Read on to learn more about the major waves of immigration into the borough, and how it still impacts Kings County today.

1766 Brooklyn map photo by Tommyill via Wikipedia.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Before Brooklyn was a cultural and arts destination, it was first a Dutch settlement known as Breuckelen — named after the town of Breukelen in the Netherlands. The Dutch colonized what is now present-day Brooklyn in 1646, establishing six different towns with defined borders. These original towns eventually became English settlements, and then the settlements were consolidated to create the City of Brooklyn. (Brooklyn wasn’t incorporated into greater New York City until 1898.)

The original six Brooklyn towns that would become Brooklyn were Bushwick, Brooklyn, Flatlands, Gravesend, New Utrecht and Flatbush. Present-day Brooklyn neighborhoods bearing these names are located roughly in the center of each of these original towns. Here are a few details of those six original towns, when Brooklyn looked a whole lot different than it does today.

Map of Brooklyn towns via Ephemeral New York.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

It’s been a hot and humid summer, and we really didn’t even get a nice spring. But it’s nothing a pitcher of sangria can’t fix. From red to white to sparkling, the classic summer cocktail is refreshing and (dangerously) tasty. It’s also a great excuse to consume vast quantities of boozy fruit. Here are six stellar Brooklyn spots for getting your sangria on.

El Almacén (Williamsburg)
This cozy Argentinian restaurant is a carnivore’s delight. It’s also a great place to spend a lazy afternoon with a pitcher of sangria. Can’t choose between red and white? Order one of each and sip them al fresco in the backyard garden.

El Almacén photo courtesy of Facebook.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Summer in Brooklyn means looking for places to spend as much time as possible outside, preferably with a drink in hand. Try these bars with great drinks and outdoor spaces.

Gowanus Yacht Club
If you want to spend the afternoon outdoors, this is the place to be. There’s literally no inside. This seasonal bar is a summery dive, with cheap beer and cheap food. You’ll find your basic beer offerings in bottles and cans, and a small draft line for pints and pitchers. The food is all from the grill, with tasty burgers, hot dogs, and sausages. No fries, though — don’t ask.

Gowanus Yacht Club photo courtesy of Facebook.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Luckily, thanks to the non-profit GrowNYC, we Brooklynites have access to year-round, locally grown and organic products in greenmarkets spread throughout the borough. Not only can you take care of the lion’s share of your food shopping directly from local farmers, but you can also recycle clothes and recyclable batteries and drop off fruit and vegetable scraps to be converted to compost. Many of the greenmarkets also accept EBT cards.

Following are seven greenmarkets you can find on the streets of Brooklyn.

Bartel-Pritchard Sq [map]

Hours: Wednesdays, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.

Year-round vendors: American Seafood Wild, Bread Alone, Stony Mountain Ranch (grass-fed beef), Williams Fruit Farm

Bartel-Pritchard Sq photo courtesy of Facebook.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Sometimes there’s nothing better than relaxing at home with an epic beer. Since Bierkraft is now sadly closed, try these beer shops to stock up.

St. Gambrinus (Boerum Hill) is a bar/bottle shop hybrid, with 16 beers on tap and over 150 bottles of craft-only beer. They also offer draft beer to go in growler form. The best way to enjoy St. Gambrinus is to grab a draft, sit in their quant backyard, then buy some bottles for home. They also offer guided tastings for those wanting to increase their beer knowledge.

St. Gambrinus photo courtesy of Facebook.