by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

You don’t have to believe in the supernatural to find Brooklyn haunting. The borough has been inhabited by humans for thousands of years and was settled by Europeans 350 years ago. It has been the site of a major Revolutionary War battle. That adds up to a lot of potential ghosts. So there is no shortage of spectral stories. Below are some ghost stories for this spooky season.

The Brooklyn Public Library (Prospect Heights) Central Branch took 29 years to build. It occupies 2.8 acres of land, has a 189-seat auditorium, houses over a million cataloged books, magazines, and multimedia material, and welcomes more than 1 million visitors each year. Librarians there tell a spooky story about a six-year-old girl who disappeared within its walls more than 40 years ago. (The story has since been exposed as a playful Halloween hoax, but for those of you who want to believe, you can learn more about Agatha Cunningham here.)

Library photo by Whatever Happened to Agatha Cunningham? via Facebook.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Storytelling may have been the very first art form, dating back to a time when humans huddled around fires for warmth, protection, and camaraderie. To this day, we still love nothing quite as much as a good story well told, as the popularity of shows like This American Life can attest.

Below are some recurring events in Brooklyn where you can hear stories that will leave you laughing, gasping, and maybe even tearing up.

The Moth (Gowanus, Brooklyn Heights, Williamsburg)
The 21st-century storytelling boom owes a lot to this event series, which got its start here in New York before expanding to dozens of cities across the country. Poet and novelist George Dawes Green hosted the first Moth event in his living room, naming it in honor of the summer evenings he spent telling stories with his friends on a porch in Georgia.

The Moth consists of open-mic Story Slams, where the host draws names out of a hat to see who gets to tell their 5-minute stories on a pre-announced topic. Winners of the Story Slams are invited to a Grand Slam event, to compete against other Story Slam winners. Their Mainstage events showcase longer, curated stories, from established storytellers, celebrities, and other people with extraordinary stories to tell.

The Moth presents at least one event every week in venues across New York. Brooklyn events include Story Slams at The Bell House and the Brooklyn Historical Society, as well as the occasional Grand Slam event at The Music Hall of Williamsburg.

Event photo by Denise Ofelia Mangen via The Moth.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

The New York City subway system is one of the world’s hardest-working rapid transit systems. It has more stations and more miles of track than any subway in the world, delivering 1.75 billion rides annually over 660 miles of revenue-producing tract. With the September 13, 2015 opening of the 7-train extension to Manhattan’s west side, the system serves 469 stations.

Though the subway officially turned 111 this year, few riders know that its roots in Brooklyn go all the way back to the Civil War era. In 1864, the Brooklyn, Bath and Coney Island Railroad began operating a steam powered engine fused with a passenger car that took beachgoers to Coney Island at the height of that destination’s popularity. It eventually became an electric trolley car, before becoming the B64 bus line that ran until 2010.

BMT Q-Type elevated car photo by Alan T. via Yelp.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Geographically, Coney Island is a sandy peninsula, formerly an island, just beyond lower New York Bay about five miles south of Manhattan that is about 4 miles (6.4 km) long and 0.5 miles (0.80 km) wide.

Culturally, however, it is one of the most significant and recognizable neighborhoods in New York City. From its early days as one of the world’s first sea resorts to its mid-20th Century status as a symbol of urban blight, it became a powerful emblem of Brooklyn’s resurgence.

Pavilion of Fun postcard by Coney Island History via Facebook.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

It’s usually no big deal when a guest come to town and crashes on your couch or in your spare bedroom. What if they have a dog or a cat with them? If you’re allergic, or have pets who are not fond of sharing their spaces, a four-legged house guest can be more than you bargained for.

You’ll be happy to know that there are a number of pet-friendly hotels in Brooklyn. Here are a few, along with pet-friendly things to do nearby.

The NU Hotel is located on Smith Street at Atlantic Avenue, putting it just minutes away from popular attractions like Barclays Center and BAM. There’s also a dog run at Pier 6, in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Should anything go awry, it’s steps away from the One Love Animal Hospital. Or, if you need some last minute toys or treats, PetSmart is a block away.

Pets Policy: “We will accommodate your four-legged friends (as long as he or she is under 50lbs) for a $100 one-time cleaning fee.”

Pooch with suitcase photo courtesy of NU Hotel.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Just as Bavarians mark Oktoberfest each autumn, Brooklynites observe the changing of the seasons by enjoying a flight of events celebrating their favorite boozes. Here are some of the upcoming beer (plus wine, cider, and food) festivals in Brooklyn.

The Village Voice Brooklyn Pour Craft Beer Festival — September 26 — will offer craft beer lovers the opportunity to choose from among more than 100 of the best seasonal, micro, and reserve brews from the New York area and beyond. It takes place at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, and will include food, entertainment, and more. The hours are from 3–6 p.m. for general admission, with early admission at 2:30 p.m. and VIP entry at 2:00 p.m. Purchase tickets here.

Photo of last year’s Brooklyn Pour event courtesy of the Village Voice via Facebook.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

In the spirit of farm-to-table cuisine, Brooklyners are now discovering distillery-to-glass imbibing, taking advantage of the explosion of local entrepreneurs plying their wares in local stores and speakeasies. Here are some Kings County spirits worth sampling.

Breuckelen Distilling (Park Slope) began distilling gin and whiskey in 2010 and has quickly catapulted to the top of many lists of new distillers. The distillery mostly uses organic grains from a farm near Newfield, New York. Rosemary, lemon, ginger, and grapefruit accompany the juniper berries in the distillery’s Glorious Gin.

Breukelen Distilling photo via Facebook.

by
2

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Brooklyn is too great not to share, especially with a dog, cat, bird, or other animal companion. Fortunately, there are many great shelters ready to find the right animal for you. Even if you’re not ready to adopt a pet (or another pet), all of the organizations below need volunteers—and donations—to help care for and play with their furred and feathered guests. Here are some of Brooklyn’s most notable animal shelters.

Badass Brooklyn Animal Rescue (Downtown Brooklyn) is a non-profit, all-volunteer, all-breed dog rescue composed of a network of fosters and volunteers. They work to rescue sweet, loving, adoptable dogs from high-kill pounds in the rural south, rehabilitate them and find them the best homes. Find out more about volunteering or adopting at their website.

“Rachel Ray” photo by Badass Brooklyn Animal Rescue via Facebook.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

In addition to our official national holidays like Labor Day, there are hundreds of unofficial “holidays” celebrating everything from beauticians to sunglasses to chicken pot pie. Following are some of September’s unofficial national holidays and the best ways to celebrate them right here in Brooklyn.

September 4 — National Wildlife Day
Prospect Park Zoo, situated on the eastern side of Prospect Park, spans 12 acres and has 125 different species as well as gardens, marshes and scrubland. It’s a must-see destination, whether or not you have kids. There are tons of exhibits, tours, and cute creatures to enjoy. For more on Prospect Park Zoo, check out this post.

Red panda photo courtesy of Lin Y. via Yelp.

by

This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

Many know of Fort Hamilton as a neighborhood in South Brooklyn, but the actual fort is both a historic monument and an active military installation providing support for the Army National Guard and Army Reserve. The site has been used for military purposes as far back as 1776 and today, it’s the last active military post in New York City.

Fort Hamilton Community Club photo by Wikipedia.