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Christmas is over, folks. You gotta get that tree out of your house while the NYC Department of Sanitation is still picking ’em up. Otherwise, you just might find yourself in July attempting to convince your pals that the desiccated pine in the living room is some kind of edgy art piece (trust us, they won’t buy it).

Here’s a simple, two-step process to properly dispose of your celebratory conifer in Brooklyn.

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Photo via Rooftop Films’ Kickstarter

For the past 19 summers, cinephiles have been gathering atop unconventional buildings — like the Old American Can Factory in Gowanus, the Bushwick Generator or Industry City in Sunset Park — to watch movies, short films and live performances as part of the nonprofit Rooftop Films series.

As the organization heads into its 20th season, it’s asking for help via a Kickstarter campaign to build its membership base and keep the community-building film events going strong.

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Brooklyn Academy of Music in Fort Greene, May 30, 1978. Photo by Dinanda Nooney

Before Brooklyn was known for being a hip brand and cultural hub, it was known for its blight, its working-class authenticity, its empty streets and its crime.

Photographer Dinanda Nooney was known mainly for her collection of gelatin-print portraits of people in their Brooklyn homes. But Nooney also photographed outdoors. While her intimate photos of local families, bedrooms, kitchens and parlors paint a nuanced portrait of the borough in its disco era, her photos of backyards and streets better reveal Brooklyn’s realness during the time.

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Clockwise from left: Master of None, The Intern, Bridge of Spies, Brooklyn

As Brooklyn becomes a bigger deal in reality, its presence on the silver screen is growing with it.

In just the last three months, three major films premiered that document various moments, both real and imagined, in Brooklyn’s history. In addition to the blockbusters, a host of other borough-themed content was released this year.