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The New York Landmarks Conservancy has announced the winners of its 25th annual Lucy G. Moses Preservation Awards. And Brooklyn is well represented. Five buildings in the borough that have recently gone through meticulous restorations have been chosen to receive the organization’s highest honors for outstanding preservation.

In Brooklyn, King’s Theatre in Flatbush (pictured above) will be receiving the award, as will the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph in Prospect Heights, the Conrad B. Duberstein U.S. Bankruptcy Courthouse in Downtown Brooklyn, Grace Church in Brooklyn Heights, and 1000 Dean Street and Berg’n. Congratulations to all of those involved in each of these projects.

The awards will take place on April 30 at 6:30 pm at the Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph at 856 Pacific Street. Tickets are $50 and can be purchased here.

Click through for photos of each of these remarkable buildings.

Photo above by Matt Lambros

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Forget the renderings. The condos at 4 Downing Street, in the building formerly known as the Broken Angel, are very beautiful in person.

The design and finishes are restrained, carefully considered, and meticulously constructed. We toured one finished model apartment as well as several others under construction Thursday.

A few artifacts from Arthur Wood’s Broken Angel remain.

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We’ve noticed development in Bed Stuy going gangbusters lately, and now there is data to prove it. Last quarter, developers filed more permits for new residential buildings in Bed Stuy than in any other neighborhood in all of New York City.

Developers filed permits for 33 new residential building in the neighborhood in the first quarter. That was three times the number filed in the runner-up neighborhood, Bushwick, which had 11 applications.

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Sales prices in Brooklyn climbed for the 10th consecutive quarter, setting a new record, while rents finally seem to have stabilized. That’s the overall picture we drew from data in reports out today from Douglas Elliman and Corcoran, confirming what we’ve been seeing in the market recently.

The Elliman report, prepared for the firm by Jonathan Miller, president of Miller Samuel, showed the median sales price for a home in Brooklyn was up 17.5 percent in the first quarter of this year over the same period last year to a record of $610,894. The median condo sales price hit a new record at $729,750. The median sales price for a one- to three-family home was up 26.9 percent over the first quarter last year to $744,000.

One of the biggest jumps in price was for two-family homes in northwest Brooklyn — the swath of 16 neighborhoods from Brooklyn Heights to Park Slope, from Fort Greene to Dumbo. Prices for those properties were up 46.2 percent over last year.

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Karl Fischer has released a rendering for a six-story, 72-unit building at 26 West Street, close to the waterfront in Greenpoint. The boxy structure, designed for developer Rabsky Group, is a cut above his typical work, a common sight in north Brooklyn and elsewhere in the borough.

The gray and red brick and arched openings at ground level echo nearby warehouses, old factories and homes. Most intriguing are the arched openings and incised lines on the first floor. There is no mention of retail planned for this building, but it will be equipped with flood barriers, 36 parking spaces for cars, and bike storage. We commend the architect for not designing blank walls at street level, and would like to see more designers adopt a similar approach.

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Listings went up Monday for six units on the site of what was formerly Broken Angel, the otherworldly art project that was once a well-known Clinton Hill landmark. Developed by Barrett Design, the property at 4-8 Downing Street contains 10 units altogether in a 19th century former tenement building and an under-construction new two-family townhouse.

The six apartments range in price from $1,125,000 for a two-bedroom, two bath to a three-bedroom, two-plus bath for $2,375,000. Renderings and floor plans show spacious units with modern finishes inside and views. Bathrooms in the four-story 19th century building have “original architectural details,” according to the listings.

There are Bosch appliances, white oak floors, an elevator, common roof deck with views of Manhattan. Some units also have private outdoor space.

The least expensive unit, No. 1B on the ground floor, is priced at $847 a square foot with 1,888 square feet total and common charges of $498 a month. The units are still under construction. The apartment building is scheduled to wrap this summer and the townhouse this fall.

Click through for renderings and floor plans. What do you think of the design and prices?

4-8 Downing Street Listings [Compass]
4Downing [Official]
Broken Angel Coverage [Brownstoner]
Renderings via Compass

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The Carpenter Gothic church at 809 Jefferson Avenue, one of Bed Stuy’s oldest structures, is now a mere shell. Demolition to make way for apartments and a new church started in January.

From the street, it appears the building has been hollowed out. The historic stained glass windows and other features have been removed. The church was standing in 1854, old maps show, and may even date from the 1840s, as we have said.

The photo above was taken last week. All the others were taken yesterday. Click through to see more.

809 Jefferson Avenue Coverage [Brownstoner] GMAP

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The beginnings of a new stoop have appeared at the wood frame house under construction at 650 Decatur Street. As readers may recall, workers demo’d the old stoop last month.

When we passed by Wednesday, we could also see that a gut renovation is taking place inside. The front facade is also being redone, as the new layer of plywood shows.

Renovation activity has really picked up in east Bed Stuy recently. Not counting new buildings, some blocks have three or more renovations going on at once. Click through for another look.

Bed Stuy Wood Frame Getting New Stoop [Brownstoner] GMAP

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Whole Foods’ restoration of the crumbling landmark next door known as the Coignet Building is well under way, although almost nothing can be discerned under the netting. When we stopped by 360 3rd Avenue in Gowanus last year, we could see that almost all of the red brick facade — not original to the building and not staying — had been removed, save a small strip or so.

When we stopped by again Thursday, we found this rendering posted on the fence. A little bit of the exterior was also visible through a gap in the netting.

Whole Foods got going on the project after being fined twice by Landmarks twice for failure to maintain the structure, which was one of the first all-concrete buildings in the U.S. Click through to see the construction project shrouded in netting.

Coignet Building Coverage [Brownstoner]