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Demolition permits were just approved on Friday for a three-story brick building at 977 Manhattan Avenue, home to Goldsholle and Garfinkel Hardware for decades. The building is like most that line Greenpoint’s main thoroughfare — retail at street level and a few modest apartments above.

The developer filed plans for an eight-story building with 14 apartments and ground-floor retail space last month. They were disapproved, but if the developer is able to get approval for its plans, the building will rise high above its neighbors on this thoroughfare of mostly three- and four-story buildings.

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Actress Christina Ricci is moving to Fort Greene. She and her husband, James Heerdegen, bought a townhouse at 67 Adelphi Street, The New York Post reported. The sale has not yet closed, so we don’t know the amount, but it was most recently asking $1,995,000.

The house is a wood frame and is 25 feet wide and semi-detached. It likely dates from the mid-19th century, but in other respects doesn’t seem especially distinguished inside or out.

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Another large, modern-style apartment building is in the works on Tompkins Avenue in Bed Stuy. We wrote about this one, at the corner of Lexington Avenue at 281-291 Tompkins Avenue, back in November, and now there are more details and a rendering, first reported on by The Bed Stuy Blog.

It will be 45 feet tall and have 31 apartments when complete. Though there is no sign of the existing five low rise commercial brick buildings in the rendering, this project is actually an expansion of the existing buildings. According to permits, the developer, The Iconic Group, will combine five existing two story buildings into a single building and then add on top of it to create the structure in the rendering above.

The rendering shows a large, box-y building in brick and stucco. The different materials break up the building into smaller sections and make it seem less monolithic. The building varies in height from three to more than six stories, according to the rendering.

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Since the 1970s, the storefront at 367 7th Avenue in Park Slope has been shuttered. In January of 2014, the whole building was on the market, asking $3,499,000.

It turns out the building belonged to a reclusive artist, Leo J. Bates, who used the retail space as his studio, a story in The New York Times over the weekend revealed. The neighborhood changed dramatically over the decades, but still the space remained locked. 

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We caught the demolition of the People’s Pleasure Palace, built sometime around 1900 at 1674 Broadway in Ocean Hill, last week and over the weekend. For decades, this has been a building supply store called Henry Distributors, aka Henry’s, and an important employer in the area.

As we have detailed in previous stories, this large and strangely shaped parcel will become supportive housing, along with the very large empty lot across the street at 1696 Broadway. Owner Stan Henry is one of the developers, along with SUS and Alembic Community Development, and someday the retail space on the ground floor of this building will include another Henry’s hardware store. The two buildings will be known as the Henry Apartments.

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For years now, an anonymous Brooklyn Heights resident has been taking his frustration with the U.S. Postal Service to the streets. Graffitied mailboxes outside his front door remained tagged, even after he submitted unfulfilled requests to the department for refurbishment.

All of this led the sort-of street artist to take matters into his own hands and personally restore them. He estimates he’s repainted about 20 pieces of public property in recent years, including mailboxes, lampposts, call boxes, tree guards, and bike racks.

He’s been profiled in local media and is well-known in the Heights for his efforts, which are technically illegal. Here’s a peek at some of his best work, and what some of it looked like before he “tricked out” chosen objects.

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Big changes are in the works for Pavilion movie theater, a beloved Park Slope institution that has been showing signs of wear. (In recent years it has been in the news for bedbug infestations.)

Developer Hidrock Realty plans to turn the movie house at 188 Prospect Park West into a 24-unit apartment building, but will leave the exterior intact and possibly include a new movie theater in the retail space as well. The developer, which has owned the building since 2006, filed an application for an alteration permit Wednesday, The Real Deal reported.

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Workers were sprucing up the storefront for rent at 112 Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights when we walked by yesterday morning. The wood trim around the front door and windows on the lower level have been primed and are being painted green.

The vacant storefront looks a tad more inviting, although inside there is still some trash and construction materials scattered sbout. This prime retail spot has been vacant since Starbucks relocated further down Montague Street to No. 134 way back in 2012.

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Construction is finally coming along at 180 Myrtle Avenue, where grocery mogul John Catsimatidis’ Red Apple Group is planning a 15-story mixed-use residential tower. The first level has risen, with 14 more to go, we saw when we stopped by Sunday.

Summer 2016 is the anticipated completion date, according to the sign on the construction fence. The building will be a rental with 213 apartments and will feature plenty of amenities, including a landscaped roof terrace.

Click through to see more construction photos and a previously published rendering of what the building will look like once complete. 

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The remaining three “Four on Degraw” townhouses from developer H Holding Group are now up for sale, with an ask of $4,999,000 each. The first townhouse, No. 451, hit the market in April 2014 asking $1,000,000 less and is in contract.

Part of the Brooklyn new-construction townhouse trend, the residences are neo-Georgian on the outside and contemporary (and very luxurious) on the inside. The architect is Gerald J. Caliendo, who has designed quite a few midrange apartment buildings in Brooklyn.