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It’s hard to find a lot of fault with this one, a beautifully renovated four-story one-family brick townhouse in a prime northern Brooklyn Heights location. It’s even got a garage parking space, and a backyard as well.

Spacious at 20 feet wide, with close to 3,000 square feet, the place is in flawless condition, with dark wood floors, exposed wooden beams and three fireplaces, at least one of which is functional.

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This is definitely not your typical South Slope frame or brick row house. This 25-foot-wide, three-story building at 404 15th Street has a 100-foot-long, 2,500-square-foot open space on the ground floor behind a massive garage door.

Above it are two 1,150-square-foot apartments that are each about 45 feet deep. The lower apartment opens onto a massive 50-foot-long roof deck.

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This four-story, four-unit Queen Anne–style row house is unusually large — 3,845 square feet spread across four floors. The exact layout is a mystery since there is no floor plan, but according to the the listing it has nine bedrooms and four bathrooms. The home, at 1397 Dean Street, is just a few blocks from the Kingston-Throop stop on the C train.

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This freestanding house at 2117 Glenwood Road in South Midwood, a legal two-family set up as a single residence, offers a lot of space. There are six bedrooms, a pair of living rooms, a dining room, three full bathrooms, a study, an additional room not designated as a bedroom for some reason, a pantry, a large foyer, and a roof deck.

There’s also a large yard, a private driveway and a garage, all on a 40-by-100-foot lot. Like we said, spacious.

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Photo by Christopher Bride for PropertyShark

The Landmarks Preservation Commission has called it “an important part of Bushwick’s architectural heritage” — and now it can be yours. The wood-frame Italianate house at 1090 Greene Avenue, built in 1887 and landmarked last year, is on the market for $1,900,000.

Once the home of grocery tycoon Henry C. Bohack, whose eponymous stores used to proliferate in Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island, the house is a “remnant of the days when Brooklyn was filled with wood framed Italianate houses,” Brownstoner’s Suzanne Spellen has written. She cited the “great details here: the columns, and entryway, the finely carved cornice, and the splendid window frames and bays.”