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Image source: Reuters via Travelers Today – what’s left of the boardwalk in some places in the Rockaways

WNYC wrote about some of the changes coming to the Rockaway beaches this summer, from the plans by the city’s Parks Department:

They include a boardwalk made of reclaimed wood and walkways with broom finish concrete; new Pavilions with wrap around billboards; and new bathrooms and lifeguard stations that will stand 12-feet above the beaches, in compliance with FEMA’s 500-year flood plan.

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Image source: Rockaway 100th Precinct Community Affairs Facebook page

WNYC reports that a representative from the Army Corps of Engineers said at the Community Board 14 meeting Tuesday night that the Rockaway beaches probably won’t be back to normal by start of summer. Apparently the beaches out there need a ton – make that 1.5 million cubic yards – of sand; the Army Corps of Engineers will start to add sand at the start of the summer.

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Image source: Charles Le Brigand

NY1 reports on another post-Hurricane Sandy Rockaways documentary that is in production, called John Cori Warned You. Created by longtime residents, advocates, and the group Friends of Rockaway Beach (an organization founded by John Cori himself and his friend Eddie Pastore), and produced by Dan Brown, their goal with this film is to bring more attention to the destruction and devastation that occurred on the Rockaway  beaches during and after Hurricane Sandy.

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Image source: Charles Le Brigand

The good folks at rockawayhelp live-tweeted the Community Board 14 meeting on Tuesday evening that took place at the Knights of Columbus (GMAP). They then compiled their tweets (they used the hashtag #cb14) into a blog post. Here are some particularly interesting tidbits.

The general idea about the meeting: “This meeting focused on the Parks department and opening the beaches this summer. It was not about a long term rebuilding strategy. It was focused primarily on short-term solutions.” The next CB14 meeting on February 12th will be with the Army Corps of Engineers, and that will be focused on more long-term rebuild issues.

Dorothy Lewandowski, Queens Parks Commissioner, was there and spoke to the attendees about the beaches and boardwalk.

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Image source: Padriac on Flickr

Now that summer is over, street parking resumes on the streets of some neighborhoods in the Rockaways. The NY Times reports about this restrictive parking situation during the summer and holidays in the neighborhoods of Belle Harbor and Neponsit (that’s where that $5.1 million house was sold), two rather upscale parts of Queens. In Belle Harbor, you can’t park there on summer weekends and holidays, and in Neponsit, the streets are off limits to parking all summer long.

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Where to go for your next beach escape? There are lots of guides to finding the right Queens beach for a weekend getaway — Queens Mamas lists great beaches for kids, Huff Post lists a number of restaurants and activities on the peninsula, and Gothamist’s 2011 guide is rich with photos of good eats, architecture, and local dives. We’ll tell you how to get there, what to bring, and where to eat once you’ve made enough sandcastles to work up an appetite.

Rockaway Beach and Boardwalk – This beach is the easiest to access via subway. That means it’s where everyone else is headed too, which has its benefits — especially in the form of yummy goodness at Rockaway Taco and Veggie Island, and from the Shore Fruit bike kabob ladies. The masses generally pack in between Beach 85th and Beach 110th Streets, so if you want more peace and less party, we recommend either the swimming beach at Beach 60th Street or the end of the boardwalk past Beach 115th Street. The city-owned Rockaway Beach is super long, so take advantage of that fact to find your own spot to enjoy for the day. (GMAP)

What to bring – All you really need is your towel and your suit; you can pick up lunch, snacks, surfboards, and more in the neighborhood

Who to take – Everyone you know, including your foodie friends and your boogie-boarding kids

How to get there – 

  • A train to Beach 57 St or beyond
  • A train to Broad Channel; transfer to S (shuttle) train to Beach 90 St or beyond
  • Q52/Q53 bus from Woodside, Elmhurst, or Forest Hills
  • Rockabus shuttle from Williamsburg