House of the Day: 287 East 17th Street


This standalone house in Ditmas Park appears to have it all: beautiful late-model Arts & Crafts-meets-Victorian details in perfect condition, plus recently renovated kitchens and baths that don’t clash with the feel of the house. It also has a new roof, central air, five bedrooms, and a garage. How do you like it for $1,749,000?
287 East 17th Street [Corcoran] GMAP P*Shark

14 Comment

  • I can hear the angels singing. Think? Maybe? It was on the tour a couple years ago? I remember an Arts & Crafts LR just like it, roped off, but it probably wasn’t this one (don’t remember seeing such a big yard).

    But Ohhhhhhhh.

    Excepting the walled up fireplaces. Which is a question I have for you brownstone and or house owners. I’ve noted lately so many of the well and expensively renovated houses- all the record breaking Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, etc., places don’t have working fireplaces. Why? Is it insanely expensive to fix a messed up fireplace? To maintain? With all the money and design put into places, why are so many owners leaving the once working fireplaces ornamental? Why not refurbish to work?

  • Wow. That is one of the nicest Ditmas houses I’ve ever seen. Great location too (close, but not too close, to Q train and Cortelyou.) I bet it gets ask. That top floor office/studio/bedroom is just awesome.

  • Most definitely a stunner of a house! Love everything about it. . . except for the MB. Great space and light, but not crazy about those finishes. Overall though, I’ll take it!

  • minard

    Beautiful photos and great floorplan. Why can’t more top-end listings be like this?
    The house is great although it needs another full bath.

  • To answer the question on the fireplaces – it is often a matter of taste, as not everyone loves the smell from a fireplace. Sometime it is a matter of logistics. In old houses, depending on the age, many time the chimneys were used for other buidling infrastructure upgrades such as flue from the newfangled boiler, indoor plumbing, you name it. So to restore the original fireplaces to their original gas or wood burning status would require extensive channeling through the walls to reroute everything else. I would also add working fireplaces are high maintenance and increase insurance costs, and seem to be pretty energy inefficient.

  • I liked these houses better when I was looking at coops and saw a few of these, back when they were priced like an 800 sq ft Park Slope 2 bedroom coop, 250-350K-ish. But I suppose back then they weren’t fancily renovated with central AC. But then, if I had renovated myself, I could have put in bathrooms and kitchens to my own taste, which is not theirs (and not that of most renovations I see.) I couldn’t see taking on the cost and time of renovating one back then, and paying a lot to heat it, until the windows and insulation were improved – it would be nice to have one now, but I don’t think I made the wrong decision given my finances and demanding work hours then.

    As to fireplaces, people did seem to fix them more back in the earlier decades of the current brownstone renovation phenomenon. (I rented a floor of a brownstone with an original gas fireplace that had been turned into a woodburning one, by an early renovator, which I liked.) I think it was because people then were looking to restore the house to something somewhat akin to the Victorian style the house may have had back when it was built. More recent renovators often want modern style. Also, they now (those who don’t inherit) are working much longer hours to pay for the house, so don’t have the same leisure hours as the proverbial teachers who could afford brownstones in the 60s and 70s. (Not knocking teachers’ work habits – those I know work all the time – but there’s that the line about teachers being able to buy brownstones a few decades ago when no one wanted them…and they do get to do a lot of their evening and weekend grading and lesson planning work at home, perhaps in front of the fire…and they tend to be able to be home to sleep at night – they’d have to, to be able to spend a day standing in front of a classroom full of kids, I can’t imagine doing that myself.) Many of the current renos are probably re-renovations of ones renovated between the 1960s and mid-80s anyway.

    Yes, my fire smelled sometimes – I could be wrong, but I thought that was a function of how well the fireplace/chimney flue was built and maintained. And the living room was drafty from the chimney – but since the boiler/radiator heat barely reached the top floor, I was able to stay toasty on really cold winter nights sleeping on the guest sofabed in the living room, by the fire. A shower in the morning, and I didn’t go to work smelling like smoke, though the wood smoke smell lingered a bit in the apartment – not long, though, due to drafty windows. Probably not great for my allergies (nor for the environment – perhaps some don’t renovate their old fireplaces for environmental reasons), but I hated sleeping in a cold place – don’t miss that about that apartment.

  • I liked these houses better when I was looking at coops and saw a few of these, back when they were priced like an 800 sq ft Park Slope 2 bedroom coop, 250-350K-ish. But I suppose back then they weren’t fancily renovated with central AC. But then, if I had renovated myself, I could have put in bathrooms and kitchens to my own taste, which is not theirs (and not that of most renovations I see.) I couldn’t see taking on the cost and time of renovating one back then, and paying a lot to heat it, until the windows and insulation were improved – it would be nice to have one now, but I don’t think I made the wrong decision given my finances and demanding work hours then.

    As to fireplaces, people did seem to fix them more back in the earlier decades of the current brownstone renovation phenomenon. (I rented a floor of a brownstone with an original gas fireplace that had been turned into a woodburning one, by an early renovator, which I liked.) I think it was because people then were looking to restore the house to something somewhat akin to the Victorian style the house may have had back when it was built. More recent renovators often want modern style. Also, they now (those who don’t inherit) are working much longer hours to pay for the house, so don’t have the same leisure hours as the proverbial teachers who could afford brownstones in the 60s and 70s. (Not knocking teachers’ work habits – those I know work all the time – but there’s that the line about teachers being able to buy brownstones a few decades ago when no one wanted them…and they do get to do a lot of their evening and weekend grading and lesson planning work at home, perhaps in front of the fire…and they tend to be able to be home to sleep at night – they’d have to, to be able to spend a day standing in front of a classroom full of kids, I can’t imagine doing that myself.) Many of the current renos are probably re-renovations of ones renovated between the 1960s and mid-80s anyway.

    Yes, my fire smelled sometimes – I could be wrong, but I thought that was a function of how well the fireplace/chimney flue was built and maintained. And the living room was drafty from the chimney – but since the boiler/radiator heat barely reached the top floor, I was able to stay toasty on really cold winter nights sleeping on the guest sofabed in the living room, by the fire. A shower in the morning, and I didn’t go to work smelling like smoke, though the wood smoke smell lingered a bit in the apartment – not long, though, due to drafty windows. Probably not great for my allergies (nor for the environment – perhaps some don’t renovate their old fireplaces for environmental reasons), but I hated sleeping in a cold place – don’t miss that about that apartment.

  • I want this play except the master bedroom

  • Gorgeous house. Me want!

    Beautiful furnishings, too. The owners have great taste. Kitchen and baths not really to my taste, but so what, they are really very well done, and do complement the house more than most do. There’s nothing to do here but put your toothbrush in the cup and settle down. That’s certainly a great thing.

  • That master suite looks like an entire apartment, with the kitchenette and how it is furnished. I’ve been in big top floors like this that people rented out to tenants they were very friendly with – you could do that here, too.

    I agree the kitchen is better done than most…my standards are not so picky, really, for kitchens and baths in rentals and cheaper owned properties I’ve lived in – “Can I stand it and not hate it?” is my only question. I wouldn’t hate this, it’d pass the test – but somehow when I think of spending well over a million, I think I should only do that if I have my taste in the reno.

    Yes, beautiful furniture. I see a few things to fix – the wood on the banister and newel posts and some doorways needs some TLC. And the painted drywall in the fireplaces bugs me – I’d at least do something decorative, like tile surrounding old metal fireplace covers – even if I didn’t want to create wood-burning fireplaces. Quibbles, though, nice house!