On Prospect Park: Officially Sold Out!


Richard Meier’s On Prospect Park has reached its finish line. Straight from the building’s lead broker, Cheryl Nielsen-Saaf:

“The initial sales process at 1 Grand Army Plaza has indeed reached its conclusion. It was a wonderful project to work on from my perspective and I feel very fortunate having been there from the beginning during the design phase and well before sales commenced. Then through the downturn in 2008, adjusting to the new market realities and selling the majority of the units despite its very unique and different style.”

What a ride! Plans were first announced for this project in 2005, it hit the market in 2008. Construction on the penthouse units wrapped in September 2010. We just featured a resale as yesterday’s Condo of the Day. GMAP

23 Comment

  • Having walked passed this building a million times, I think the floor to ceiling windows while nice from the inside, dont look so great from the outside, as you can see peoples crap in the apartment. they should have of made the windows with a slight tint as for people on the outside not be able to see the inside, because it makes the building look sloppy.

    Also, there should have of been some sort of uniformity with window coverings, not that people want to be told what to put on their windows, but when a building is all glass like this, it is part of the “look” so if everyone had the same shades or something it would look better.

    I have mixed feelings about this building, sometimes I like it, sometimes I dont.

    Sometimes, I feel like forgiving you…

    Sometimes, I don’t….

    well………………….

  • No love for this building. I live nearby and walk by it often, and it gives a feeling of being cold and harsh. Would be nice if the bottom floor common space was at least beautiful to look at, but as of yet it still looks unfinished. A glass godzilla-like monster took a glass crap on his way to the park.

  • I love it and wish I could afford to live there.

  • no-permits

    i was on the roof not even six months ago and it was still very much under construction. in my opinion, the penthouses should have been finished sooner. it seems that once there were a few big sales, such as the penthouses units, the building seemed to start getting some positive attention.

  • What’s odd is how people who love modern architecture and the Bauhaus inspired school from which Meier borrows don’t feel the need to go out of their way to talk about how much they could never live in narrow, windowless, brownstones that were the prefab homes of their era.

    It’s sort of like how people go out of their way to tell you that they could never live in New York, whereas you never feel compelled to tell them you could never live in Houston / Boston / Madison.

    • Not so sure about Boston, but I’d tell anyone who’d listen that I wouldn’t live in Houston, or Atlanta, or Miami, or Los Angeles, or….

      And, of course, I wouldn’t live in that pseudo-Bauhaus monstrosity and have no problem whatsoever with someone who likes that sort of thing saying they wouldn’t live in a brownstone.

      • But what’s interesting about it is the anger that the modern style of architecture inspires in you brownstone people. Nothing on Eastern Parkway matches anything else on Eastern Parkway architecturally, they’re all apartment houses and the space that building sits on used to be a parking lot…and yet the anger of many.

        Brownstone dwellers as the Tea Party of residential real estate?

  • Good news and really like the building. Looks like a jewel at nighttime and adds a nice bit of class (and glass) to Grand Army Plaza. Is it still the rumor that Beyonce and Jay Z bought the penthouse?

  • Havelc:

    It is clear from the psf sales prices that these condos are more desirable than anything else in the area, including brownstones and pre-war co-ops. While brownstoner readers may be opposed to this building, it’s obvious the general buying public in the market for condos were willing to spend over $1000 psf on these units, almost double the psf prices of other apartments in the area. Loud, vocal minority. That’s all.

  • noladarling

    We did it! We did it! Drinks are on me guys. Um, wait a minute…

  • “Tea Party” is a bit strong Havelc, but I’m sure Prospectperc is right that we’re a minority. IIRC this website used to be self-described as intended for those with an “unhealthy obsession” with Brooklyn Brownstones and I’d be the first to admit that we’re a bit crazy–and proud of it :-)

    • @bobmarvin, no hard feelings intended :)

      The ‘monstrosity” comment just riled my modernist sensibilities!

      And you know what, your point about the “unhealthy obsession” is a good one. The site is called “Brownstoner” after all.

  • This has to be the least contextual buiding ever designed. I think its an eyesore especially when compared to its neighbors, the elegant arch and the main branch of the library. It is an insult to Grand Army Plaza.

  • East New York

    I’ve always liked this place. Not surprising it’s sold out.

  • Well, as one of those who is madly in love with brownstones, I’m not ashamed to say that I absolutely love this building. As a matter of fact, I believe it’s truly possible to love old architecture and modern architecture at the same time. And while I also don’t believe this building to be an example of “genius” modern architecture, it’s not the architectural “monstrosity” my good friend Bob Marvin sees it as either. IMO, it’s a very desirable glass high rise in a most desirable location that, instead of offending, actually brings a bit of pleasing,contemporary diversity to the architectural scene at the Plaza and Parkway.

  • NeoGrec

    I also live nearby and agree about that some of the window treatments could be improved/made more uniform. Also that the ground floor lets down the overall tone (especially the landscaping — common folks, that’s not so expensive to get right). But, overall, it’s a shot of bright, modern architectural energy at a very important Brooklyn location. Somehow it succeeds in making GAP more relevant and vital.

  • No offense taken havelc. Actually monstrocity was an overstatement. IMO the building is not awful, but is a rather tired re-statement of 80+ year old Bauhaus ideas, not, in itself, a bad thing, but I found the marketing of this building, as architecture as art, rather off-putting.

  • No offense taken havelc. Actually monstrocity was an overstatement. IMO the building is not awful, but is a rather tired re-statement of 80+ year old Bauhaus ideas, not, in itself, a bad thing, but I found the marketing of this building, as architecture as art, rather off-putting.

  • does anyone now what the average ppsf was

  • no-permits

    $948 according to street easy

  • I like this building, I also like well maintained brownstones. I dislike any building that is not well maintained. I don’t think a neighborhood has to be frozen in an architectural time warp. Living in a different glass building in the nabe, we’ve recently had privacy film put on our windows, and it makes a big difference, it is a pity developers don’t think about actually living in a building. Residents need their privacy and the neighborhood doesn’t need to look at the back of someone’s couch. Developers really should install window films throughout these all glass buildings.

  • I like this building, I also like well maintained brownstones. I dislike any building that is not well maintained. I don’t think a neighborhood has to be frozen in an architectural time warp. Living in a different glass building in the nabe, we’ve recently had privacy film put on our windows, and it makes a big difference, it is a pity developers don’t think about actually living in a building. Residents need their privacy and the neighborhood doesn’t need to look at the back of someone’s couch. Developers really should install window films throughout these all glass buildings.