It’s big, it’s beautiful and it’s a condo — in a landmarked brownstone. This fetching two-bed, two-bath sits at the top floor of a 25-foot-wide house at 214 Park Place in Prospect Heights. Fully renovated six years ago, it’s a nice unit in fine shape, with an attractive kitchen, a lot of built-ins and a functional layout.

Weighing in at around 1,100 square feet, it’s got a spacious living room and an open-plan kitchen in the front, separated by an island with a white stone countertop. The former has a wall of built-in shelving/cabinetry and a wood-burning fireplace. Also nice big windows, which are reputed to offer a skyline view.

Situated in the Turner Towers, the art deco co-op building at 135 Eastern Parkway, this two-bedroom, two-bath unit offers high-ceilings, an elegant pre-war feel and a fair amount of space — around 1,300 square feet.

The large eat-in kitchen needs redoing, which could be considered a negative — or an opportunity to create one in accordance with your own vision. The listing, from Tracey McLean at Corcoran, says the bathrooms need work as well, though we quite like the old-school black-and-white-tile scheme in the one pictured.

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Architect’s illustration via Brooklyn Public Library

To the woe of local preservationists, the Landmark Preservation Commission has announced that, following review, they did not find a former bank in Prospect Heights to be worthy of landmarking. The neoclassical property at 856 Washington Avenue has been approved for demolition, with permits filed to replace it with a 14-story condo building.

So apparently simple and refined is this Prospect Heights brownstone that you might not suspect it recently underwent an extensive renovation: the removal of a bearing wall to open up the parlor floor, necessitating a new steel beam from front to rear; all-new kitchen and baths; stripping all original woodwork; restoration of the ceiling plaster and moldings; new rift-sawn oak floors throughout; all-new electrical and central air; and many things you don’t see (example: retractable screens to enclose the house’s original back porch and exclude mosquitos).