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Construction is moving along at the six-story building at 79 Grand Street at the corner of Wythe Avenue in Williamsburg. The five-unit building has topped out, most of the windows are in and it is now clad in what appears to be foam board insulation.

Right now, the foam looks patchy and worn in places, but it is not the final layer and will not show when the building is complete. We’re not sure what the wood at the corners is for — possibly pockets for structural attachments for balconies.

It appears the building will have several terraces in places where there are currently large openings without windows and cantilevered slabs protruding from the facade. When complete, the building will have 7,996 square feet of residential space — one unit per floor, and a duplex on the top two floors. The permit also calls for 1,590 square feet of ground floor commercial space.

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We found three previously unpublished renderings of the huge Chetrit hotel-apartment-retail complex going up at 500 Metropolitan. They reveal the complex has a name: The M500. Sounds like something out of a Bond film. Should go well with the smoldering interior renderings interior designers Raad Studio released earlier this year.

The new renderings are at least the fourth set from as many architects. Kutnicki Bernstein has stuck with the basic concept — a wedge-shaped complex — and given it more definition. 

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More units at Two Trees’ rental building at 60 Water Street in Dumbo are hitting the market this week. We toured the glassy building Friday and got an eyeful of its incredible views of the Brooklyn Bridge as well as a look at the garden being built on the roof, above, and one of the new units.

Click through for a new rendering of the garden and its water feature. The unit we toured is a two-bedroom, two-bath apartment on the 16th floor.

Coming this week are studios, one-bedrooms and two-bedrooms on the 16th, 17th and 18th floors. Also, there is a deal: Two months’ rent will be free the first year.

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The Piet Boon-designed The Oosten in South Williamsburg has risen to about six and a half out of its total seven stories, we saw when we stopped by Sunday. Workers have also started covering parts of the structure in gypsum and fiberglass insulating panels.

The building has risen to its full height on at least one of its corners, but still has one more story coming elsewhere, as the photos and previously published rendering below show.

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One of Brooklyn’s most unusual new buildings is up to the second story at 55 Wythe Avenue, and its distinctive Jetsons-like tower over a block of one-story shops can already be discerned, we saw when we stopped by over the weekend.

Formerly known as the Level Hotel, the William Vale Hotel will have 183 “four star” rooms, according to its website. The developer is Riverside Developers and the architect is Albo Liberis, The Wall Street Journal reported last month.

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NYC Housing Connect is now accepting affordable housing applications for the new building finishing up at 490 Myrtle Avenue in Clinton Hill. As you may recall, this is where the Associated Supermarket used to be, between Hall and Emerson.

Affordable units make up 20 percent of the seven-story, 93-unit building. The 19 affordable units start at $816 a month for a studio.

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We recently toured the three biggest construction projects on Bedford Avenue in Williamsburg: The Salvation Army at 176 Bedford Avenue, the Whole Foods store going up at 242 Bedford Avenue, and the Apple store going in at 247 Bedford Avenue.

Nothing much has changed at the Salvation Army site, pictured above, which is to be expected. The charity is in the process of selling the property to a developer but nothing has hit public records yet.

A few blocks down at the Whole Foods site, progress is achingly slow. Some additional structure and netting recently appeared on the metal frame that reached two stories some months ago.

At the Apple store, they have been working quickly despite the heavy snows this winter. The foundation is coming along, although cement had not yet been poured when we stopped by April 2. Click through for lots more photos. 

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The owner of a group of retail buildings in the Jackson Heights Historic District has filed an application with the Landmarks Preservation Commission to build on top of the existing structure according to DNAinfo. The buildings at 84-11 through 84-23 37th Avenue are owned by Charlie Patel according to the website. He applied to the commission for permission to add a rooftop extension as well as to replace to windows and doors on the 1946 commercial building.

Since the building is in an historic district the landmarks commission must approve any changes visible from the street. Owners of the businesses in his building have not been notified of any impending construction and no date has yet been set for a hearing on the proposal.

Landlord Plans Rooftop Addition in Jackson Heights Historic District [DNAinfo]

Photo: DNAinfo/Katie Honan

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The Durst Organization has finally closed on the final parcel needed for the huge Hallets Point development according to The Real Deal.

In September Durst paid over $100,000,000 for a 90 percent stake in the project. This fall the development hit a snag. Durst could not close on the final parcel of land it needed. Lincoln Equities, which spent years acquiring the properties necessary for the mega project, had passed along a contract for sale for one of those properties (1-02 26th Avenue in Astoria) when it sold the 90 percent stake to Durst. But the owner balked at selling. In October it sued Durst and Lincoln, asserting that it had accepted less than fair market value for the property in exchange for equity in the project. With the sale of the development to Durst, the owner would no longer receive any equity. Lincoln planned to buy the lot for $7.5 million. Durst is reported to have just paid $15 million for it.

When completed the seven-acre development will have seven residential buildings with 2,200 units. Twenty percent of the units are designated as affordable. The development will also include a public school, supermarket and waterfront esplanade. With the final roadblock out of the way, construction should begin in October and will last for six years.

Durst Closes on Final Parcel Needed for Hallets Point Mega Project [TRD]
All Hallets Point Coverage [Q’Stoner]

Rendering via STUDIO V Architecture/James Corner Field Operations