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The city has finished demolishing the mid-19th century wood frame at 69 Vanderbilt Avenue in the Wallabout Historic District, DNAinfo reported. A construction fence went up around the home in August, after the DOB responded to a complaint in June that the house was shaking and leaning. The HPD filed demolition permits to knock down the house in December. The house was still standing when we passed by January 4, although demo may have started earlier.

Preservationists had spent years fighting to save the house, which was built in the Greek Revival style with Italianate details. Wood turner Richard Pease built the home — as well as the much better-maintained twin house next door at 71 Vanderbilt — no later than the summer of 1850, according to the historic district’s designation report, although it could be older.

The LPC decided the building had deteriorated too much, and sued the property owner to demolish it, said DNAinfo. Once the court ruled in favor of the LPC, the city moved forward with demolition. Now the vacant lot is in the process of being sold, according to DNAinfo.

164-Year-Old Landmarked Home Reduced to Rubble in Clinton Hill [DNAinfo]
Closing Bell: City to Demolish Landmarked Greek Revival Wood Frame in Wallabout [Brownstoner]
Photo by Myrtle Avenue Revitalization Project LDC

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We’re sad to report that the city plans to demolish the crumbling mid-19th century wood frame at 69 Vanderbilt Avenue in the Wallabout Historic District. The HPD filed an emergency demolition permit last week.

A complaint from June said the house was shaking and leaning, and the DOB report said “front porch is unstable…neighboring houses may be in danger.”

Back in August after the construction fence went up we speculated the city had no plans to tear it down. Unfortunately, we were wrong.

“The New York Landmarks Conservancy has had No. 69 on its endangered list for years,” said the New York Times’ Christopher Grey in 2010. “There are only two ways it could get off the list, and right now it’s more likely to go feet first.”

Thanks to Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn Partnership for the tip and the photo.

69 Vanderbilt Avenue Coverage [Brownstoner]
Photo by Myrtle Avenue Revitalization Project LDC

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We were relieved to see the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted yesterday to landmark 1090 Greene Avenue in Bushwick. It is one of the last well-preserved wood frame houses in the area. Preservation advocate Historic Districts Council called it “a distinctive reminder of 19th-century Bushwick.”

It is rare for the LPC to landmark wood frame houses, perhaps because they are so often altered beyond recognition.

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We were saddened to find this ad marketing a circa-1900 standalone wood frame house in East Flatbush as a development site for $1,000,000. Instead of describing the home, CPEX notes that the house at 780 New York Avenue sits on a 2,500-square-foot lot that’s zoned for a building as large as 10,000 square feet. A potential developer could also take advantage of the property’s 421-a tax abatement.

It seems like the house is being flipped after selling for $480,000 in May. It’s located across the street from SUNY Downstate, just outside the Prospect Lefferts Gardens border.

Photo by Nicholas Strini for PropertyShark

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We’re sad to report that the prominent and quite old wood frame at the corner of Throop and Pulaski in Bed Stuy is now nothing but a bunch of debris. The mansard-roofed house at 330 Throop Avenue stood three stories tall and was built sometime before 1873. It was configured as a three-family and sat on a double lot that measures 45 by 85 feet. It was also a Building of the Day a year ago.

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At one time, most of Bushwick and other eastern parts of Brooklyn were covered in fanciful late-19th-century painted ladies just like San Francisco, only minus the bay windows. Now it’s rare to see a wood-frame house that hasn’t lost its gingerbread to vinyl siding, and the area looks like Queens circa 1950. Our house is one of these. Above, our dilapidated current exterior with Permastone on the first floor and vinyl siding and replacement windows. Click through to the jump below to see how it looked when it was built. The difference is shocking, and sad.