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The tall tower JEMB Realty is developing at 420 Albee Square in Downtown Brooklyn will be a mere 35 stories instead of 65, according to the latest permit filings, first spied by New York YIMBY. Meanwhile, we see the developer just closed on an adjacent site with a historically significant building on it and is planning a demolition.

An old three-story 19th century wood frame building at 233 Duffield Street is one of three historic stops on the Underground Railroad on the block the Landmarks Preservation Commission tried to save from demolition back in 2007, as we reported at the time.

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If you’re on the hunt for a furnished apartment in Bed Stuy, this four-bedroom, 2.5-bath pad is newly renovated with all the bells and whistles you could want. There’s a rolling granite kitchen island, stainless steel dishwasher, wine rack and a stove with a built-in griddle.

The IKEA furniture might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but already assembled beds and desks in every room might be convenient for a group of roommates. It also has central A/C and laundry in the basement. What’s your opinion of it for $3,995 a month?

505 Throop Avenue, #1 [Citi Habitats] GMAP

The partially built 23-story tower at 626 Flatbush Avenue in Prospect Lefferts Gardens has just started taking applications for affordable rentals, according to developer Hudson Companies. Rents for the 51 subsidized units start at $565 for a studio, $607 for a one-bedroom, $736 for two bedrooms and $843 for three bedrooms.

And income requirements range from $19,371 for a single person and go as high as $50,100 for a family of six. Half of the affordable apartments will be reserved for current residents of Community Board 9. (The area covers southern Crown Heights, Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Wingate and part of North Flatbush.)

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This week our Open House Picks consists of two outliers and two flips. The most expensive property is a single-family house in Victorian Flatbush that appears to be a custom-built home dating from the mid to late 20th century. Bargain hunters should check out the pick at the other end of the price scale, a circa-1900 neo-Colonial in Old Mill Basin. The two flips, both in Bushwick, are unusually decent, plus they also have original details such as mantels, window surrounds and stairs.

Open House Picks

Prospect Park South
200 Rugby Road
Broker: Halstead
Price: $2,100,000
Sunday 1:00 – 3:00
GMAP

Bushwick
73 Cornelia Street
Broker: Corcoran
Price: $1,200,000
Sunday 12:00 – 1:00
GMAP

Bushwick
1163 Putnam Avenue
Broker: Corcoran
Price: $950,000
Sunday 12:00 – 1:00
GMAP

Old Mill Basin
1457 East 58th Street
Broker: Fillmore
Price: $444,000
Sunday 1:00 – 3:00
GMAP

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Three out of four sold ain’t bad. We’re surprised by the closing price of the Bushwick sale, which went over ask. Even for a freshly renovated property, which it was, $1,225,000 is a very high number for a house in this location, near the Halsey J train stop.

As for the other sales, the most expensive and the least expensive homes on the list, Park Slope and Greenwood Heights, both sold for slightly under ask. South Slope is still available.

Evidently, the high asking prices we’ve been seeing for a while in the outer fringes of Bushwick are no longer just pie-in-the-sky but actually reflect the market.

Open House Picks 9/19/2014 [Brownstoner]

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Developer Hudson Companies is on a tear through East Flatbush, buying up more property on a block where it’s already planning an eight-story, 170-unit apartment building. The developer, which of course is behind the 23-story tower on Flatbush Avenue a few blocks from here in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, recently picked up 318, 324, 326 and 350 Clarkson Avenue for $13,119,997, according to public records.

The new parcel is contiguous with its previous acquisition, so potentially Hudson could be planning a huge development here.

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This three-bedroom brownstone duplex is yet another beautifully renovated and pricey Bed Stuy pad. The 1,500-square-foot apartment has an eat-in kitchen with a decorative marble mantel, pretty woodwork, a dishwasher and a wine rack. The bathroom also features an original claw foot tub and attractive blue patterned tile.

There is basement storage and a washer/dryer. The G train is half a block away at Classon Avenue.

Incidentally, the building was a House of the Day when it was for sale in 2013, and configured differently. We do see a potential deal breaker, though: The bathroom and the bedrooms are on separate floors.

What’s your opinion of it for $4,000 a month?

420 Lafayette Avenue, #2 [Elliman] GMAP

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Mayor de Blasio’s housing plan won’t bring affordable units to low-income areas but it will destroy the character of the most expensive neighborhoods in Brooklyn, said housing experts — including real estate execs — in a Wall Street Journal article yesterday. Here are the deets:

*In low-income areas such as East New York, no one is building market-rate housing now and no one will build market-rate housing in the future, even if the mayor succeeds with his plan to upzone the area to allow bigger and taller buildings, because the math just doesn’t pencil out.

*Meanwhile, the mayor’s plan would work beautifully in higher-income areas such as Park Slope and Williamsburg — except that Bloomberg-mandated “contextual zoning” height caps make it impossible.

Mayor de Blasio is pushing to wipe out those hard-won height caps with a “text amendment” to the building zoning code (as we mentioned in yesterday’s article about the zoning controversy in Prospect Lefferts Gardens). If he succeeds, new buildings and additions 15 to 30 percent higher than what is allowed now will quickly sprout throughout Brooklyn’s most expensive and tony areas and beyond, from Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Williamsburg, Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Bed Stuy, Crown Heights, Prospect Lefferts Gardens — anywhere land is expensive and prices and rents support luxury development.

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Here’s a spacious and affordable three-bedroom co-op for rent near the park in Flatbush. There are three nicely sized bedrooms, a large separate living room, and a windowless office off the foyer. Beamed ceilings and herringbone floors also give it a nice prewar feel. However, the co-op board does have to approve any potential renters. What are your thoughts on it for $2,600 a month?

416 Ocean Avenue, #35 [Corcoran] GMAP