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Construction on the Pulaski Bridge bike lanes has been pushed back once again. Streetsblog reported that the protected bike lanes, originally scheduled to finish this year, likely won’t open until the end of 2015. Last week, we reported construction would wrap in the spring.

Then the DOT gave a presentation [PDF] on the project and said the contractor will start work in April and continue through October or November. Pedestrians and bikers currently share the crowded walking paths, but the DOT plans to convert one lane of Brooklyn-bound traffic to a two-way bike lane.

Officials blamed the delays on the engineering of the 60-year-old drawbridge, which can’t support an additional concrete barrier, and the fact that funding for the bike lanes is tied to work on 10 other bridge projects that needed approval first. The cost of the improvements has also increased from $3,460,000 to $4,200,000.

At least the DOT has finalized a design, which will include textured rumble strips at both entrances to the bridge reminding cyclists to slow down.

Pulaski Bridge Bike Path Now Scheduled to Open by End of 2015 [Streetsblog]
Pulaski Bridge Coverage [Brownstoner]
Rendering via DOT

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The Department of Transportation plans to “launch” the long-awaited Pulaski Bridge bike lane project at a community meeting tomorrow. The DOT will present its plans at 6 pm at MoMA P.S. 1 at 22-25 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City.

Last we heard about the Pulaski bike lanes, construction was delayed until sometime next year. But last month, the DOT announced that it had found a contractor and work would wrap by spring 2015. When it’s finished, there will be a two-way bike lane and a dedicated pedestrian lane. To create the bike lane, the agency will cut three lanes of Brooklyn-bound traffic to two lanes.

Rendering via DOT

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After two years of planning, it looks like the Pulaski Bridge bike lane promised for this year will be delayed until sometime next year at least, Streetsblog reported.

A year ago, the city approved DOT’s plan to convert one lane of Brooklyn-bound car traffic on the Pulaski Bridge into a bikes-only path with separate lanes for Queens- and Brooklyn-bound bikes. Construction was supposed to start in the spring and wrap late this year (at the latest). But construction has not yet begun, and the city is still reviewing the final bid from the contractor. A spokesman for Assembly member Joe Lentol, who has been lobbying for the bike path since 2012, told Streetsblog that it’s “unlikely” work will start by the end of December.

Pedestrians and cyclists currently share the narrow path, with traffic going both ways in the same lane, creating hazardous conditions for everyone. Reconfiguring the traffic lanes is also expected to calm car traffic on McGuiness Boulevard by slowing down drivers as they come off the bridge.

As soon as the contractor gets the green light from the city, the DOT will announce a new construction timetable. Incidentally, the state is contributing $2,500,000 to the project with federal funds, and the city is contributing $625,000.

Pulaski Bridge Bikeway Likely Delayed Until Next Year [Streetsblog]
City Says Yes to Pulaski Bike Lane [Brownstoner]

Photo by NYC Tom

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An “intervention,” as the term is used in modernity, is when the family and friends of an addict or alcoholic gather to let the offending party know how their bad behavior is affecting the larger group. The idea is that the addict will be shamed into seeking some sort of professional treatment for their various issues. Clearly, things cannot continue as they are and the addict must mend their ways and conform to societal norms. There’s even a TV show called “Intervention” which presents the dramatic and emotional confrontations which ensue during these gatherings.

As everybody knows, those of us who live in Queens are dross consumerists. All of our time is spent at big box stores, fast food establishments, or just mindlessly sitting in traffic while going nowhere important. Work, breed, and die, that’s us. Brooklyn, on the other hand, has artisinal pickles, salty chocolate, and bacon ice cream. Queens needs to be more like Brooklyn, say the Brooklyn people. Well… that’s what everyone in Brooklyn and Manhattan thinks should happen around here.

Hence, the Queens Art Intervention was created, to expand our limited minds and offer a dab of color and smattering of high culture to our otherwise drab existence.

More after the jump…

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Everybody knows that the path to take when transiting from Hunters Point in Long Island City to Brooklyn’s Greenpoint and Williamsburg is the Pulaski Bridge. The bridge is of September 1954 vintage, it’s a double bascule drawbridge, and was erected under the supervision of NYC Commissioner of Public Works Frederick Zurmuhlen – who served under three mayors. The general contractor was the Horn Construction Company, with steel and expertise supplied by Bethlehem Steel. It connects LIC’s 11th Street (corner of Jackson Avenue) with McGuinness Boulevard in Greenpoint.

Thing is, it’s in kind of a weird place on both sides of Newtown Creek, where the natural “Main Streets” are Manhattan Avenue in Brooklyn and Vernon Boulevard in LIC. Something’s missing, and that something is the seldom mentioned Vernon Avenue Bridge.

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We know the Pulaski Bridge Bike lanes are happening, and they couldn’t come soon enough. Streetsblog reported today that Brooklyn’s Community Board 1 voted unanimously to support the project, Queens’ Community Board 2 is waiting on some more design details before taking a final vote. Here are the exciting details about the reconfiguration from StreetsBlog:

The path will run on the west side of the bridge, replacing one of three southbound car travel lanes over Newtown Creek… On the Queens side, the new bike path will curve alongside the existing walkway, which hugs a one-lane ramp that drivers use to access the bridge. To make room for the new bike path on the existing ramp, DOT will trim back the size of a Greenstreets traffic island at the bridge entrance. Drivers using the ramp will merge with southbound traffic from 11th Street entering the bridge, instead of continuing in the same lane as they do today.

So when’s it all happening? The DOT is waiting for state approval but expects it to come in the next few weeks. The DOT will then include the project in a contract including ten other small bridge rehab projects, but they hope to push this one to the first in line. Once construction actually starts, it will only take a few months before the bike lanes are a reality.

Next Year, Peds and Cyclists Won’t Have to Fight for Scraps on Pulaski Bridge [StreetsBlog]

Rendering via the DOT

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The New York Daily News reports an update on the Pulaski Bridge bike lane proposal, something that DOT committed to back in May. DOT plans to remove a single lane of traffic to make way for a dedicated bike lane between Long Island City and Greenpoint some time next year. The city is just finishing up with an engineering study of the bridge, after which it expects to present the proposed streetscape changes to the Queens and Brooklyn community boards in December. At this point, local pols, pedestrians, community boards and nearby businesses have all expressed support for the proposed bicycle lane.

Bikers to Get Dedicated Lane on Pulaski Bridge Between Brooklyn and Queens [NY Daily News]
Headway on Several Streetscape Proposals for Long Island City and Astoria [Q’Stoner]

Photo by NYC Tom