by
1

The Passive House condo craze has come to Boerum Hill, Prospect Heights, the Columbia Street Waterfront and now Williamsburg. We discovered this design for four stories of eco-friendly condos at 285 Grand Street on the website of developer Blue Zees.

There will be two large apartments spread across 5,416 square feet of residential space, in addition to 4,600 square feet of retail, according to building applications disapproved last week. And a restaurant will occupy the ground floor, according to Schedule A filings.

David Berridge Architect will design the project. It looks like the facade will be clad in metal siding, a feature we’ve come to expect on Passive House buildings. Both condos will have terraces, and the upper unit will be a duplex with double height windows. Blue Zees paid $2,850,000 for the property in 2012, and demolished a one-story garage last year.

What do you think of the design?  GMAP

 

by

The first of the Passive House condos at 210 Pacific Street in Boerum Hill went up for sale last month, and now the seven-story building is getting its windows. Both the teaser site and the construction fence proclaim, “The future of the City of Brooklyn begins here.”

While we’re not sure about that, the 10-unit building will include sustainable features like an electric car charging station, solar hot water heaters, triple-glazed windows, extensive insulation and energy recovery units. Designed by SBLM Architects and developed by Nava Companies, the building will be clad in custom brass tiles, according to the listing copy (you can see a closeup on the teaser site). We hope they don’t sizzle in the sun.

The development now has three listings online — two three-bedrooms and a four-bedroom — starting from $2,425,000. One asking $2,495,000 is already in contract.

210 Pacific Street [Official]
510 Pacific Street Listings [Brown Harris Stevens]
210 Pacific Street Coverage [Brownstoner]

by
1

Passive house condos are all the rage in Brooklyn these days, and last week, we got to tour what is apparently the borough’s first net zero passive house development under construction at 951 Pacific Street in Crown Heights. If a building is rated net zero, that means it is able to produce as much energy as it consumes. Designed by architect Paul Castrucci, the three condos hit the market last month.

The 5,600-square-foot building has triple-glazed Shuco windows, four inches of insulation and is wrapped in an air-sealed, breathable membrane. As is typical in passive houses, each apartment has its own “energy recovery ventilation” system that dehumidifies and pre-cools outside air during the summer and mixes outgoing hot air with outside cool air in the winter, which helps reduce energy costs. A solar array on the roof provides 4 kilowatts of electricity for each unit, and there’s a solar-powered backup outlet in case the electricity goes out. The garden has a 1,200-gallon rainwater harvest system, and the kitchen features an Energy Star Electrolux fridge, induction range and granite countertops.

The three duplexes all have outdoor space. Unit No. 1 is a one-bedroom, 1.5-bath with 1,517 square feet of space and a private garden asking $1,400,000, and Unit No. 2 — the model unit we toured — is a 1,492-square-foot three-bedroom, two-bath with two balconies asking $1,490,000. Unit No. 3 is priced at $1,567,000 and features three bedrooms and two baths spread across 1,567 square feet, along with two private roof terraces. It already has an accepted offer, according to the broker.

Construction is expected to finish by the end of the year. Click through for more interior photos and description.

951 Pacific Street [Official]

by
12

Williamsburg-based architect firm Loadingdock5 has designed passive houses and condos all over Brooklyn, including some for Hello Living!, and now the group is building its own passive house apartment building at 152 Freeman Street in Greenpoint, according to New York YIMBY.  The seven-unit “Haus” is designed to be like a “baugruppe” (German for “building group”), a cooperative community that builds its own home, usually to passive house standards. It’s a popular living arrangement among architects and builders in Germany and Austria.

We’re not wild about the facade, which has a typical boxy passive house look and asymmetrical windows, but the project is intriguing. The architects say on their website that they want to prove a passive house can be built for relatively little money in New York. The four-story project will have one unit on the first floor and two each on the second through fourth floors, along with a shared garden and roof deck. Each apartment will be about 700 square feet.

The project has already been beset by costly delays, though. An energy audit by the New York City Building Department took a year. What do you think of the development?

Revealed: Haus at 152 Freeman Street, Greenpoint Passive House Baugruppe [NYY]
Rendering by Loadingdock5

by
3


By now it’s not news that the Passive House trend is alive and kicking in Kings County. Here’s another for the list, though: 258 11th Street, between 4th and 5th Avenue—which sold this May to its new owners—is now being completely renovated to Passive House standards. The architect involved, Jeremy Shannon of Prospect Architecture, says the home required a full gut, making it a “good opportunity” for a Passive House retrofit. The house will boast many of the same features as this one in Brooklyn Heights, including triple paneled windows. There is also a one-story addition planned. The project is currently three months in and and is expected to wrap in December or January. GMAP