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Image source: MTA (click here for a larger image/pdf)

Currently the MTA is in the midst of a proposal to introduce Metro-North train service to the east Bronx, using Amtrak’s Hell Gate line (cool photos here). Four new stations are also being considered for this transit-light area, including the vicinities of Morris Park, Co-op City, Hunts Point, and Parkchester. These stations would provide connections to Penn Station, Westchester, and Connecticut.

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The MTA is rehabbing the Jay Street Substation at 212 Jay Street and building a new circuit breaker house next door for the A/C/F lines. Work on the existing structure, according to this project plan, “includes site preparation; exterior brick work; installation of roof walking pads; replacement of doors, frames, windows, guardrails and pipe railings; new emergency exit; repair of exterior/interior cracks,” among other upgrades. The new circuit breaker house is going in adjacent to 212 Jay Street and will have an upgraded power system and new control system for the subway lines. Work on the $34.6 million project should wrap in the first quarter of next year. GMAP

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Yesterday the MTA announced that it plans to improve weekend service on the L train, running trains more frequently on the line by the middle of next year. According to a recent study by the MTA, weekend ridership on the L has increased 141 percent since 1998. Ridership on the L, as compared with other lines, does not drop off significantly on the weekend. State Senator Daniel Squadron, who has been pushing for L train improvements, had the following to say in a press release: “As ridership and our communities change and grow, our transit system cannot be stuck on the nine-to-five clock. Improving weekend L service is a step toward a subway system that keeps up with its riders every day of the week.” The MTA also plans to evaluate weekday ridership levels on the line.
Photo by okreitz

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Yesterday the MTA announced that it intends to seek a developer to take over its neglected former headquarters at 370 Jay Street. The building is owned by the city and leased to the MTA, which started vacating it in 2001. According to a spokesman for the MTA, the building’s use and whether it’s going to be sold or leased will depend on the responses to a forthcoming RFP. Politicians hailed the news. Borough President Marty Markowitz said that “the rest of Downtown Brooklyn has undergone tremendous and transformative growth, yet 370 Jay Street has remained a virtually vacant eyesore—at times obstructed by sidewalk scaffolding and an unsightly black scrim to protect passersby from the building’s crumbling facade.” And State Senator Daniel Squadron said the following, in part: “Taking 370 Jay Street out of mothballs and into use will mean dramatic progress in a keystone location for Downtown Brooklyn. I urge the city and the MTA to quickly issue an RFP in the coming weeks.”
MTA Finally Parting With Unused Brooklyn Building [Crain’s] GMAP
MTA Puts 370 Jay St. Up for Sale — At Last [Eagle]

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Late last week the fliers above appeared on B61 bus shelters in Red Hook, and they’re a mixture of a PSA about the upcoming closure of the Smith-9th station and a call to residents to write to the MTA to request better bus service while the station is under repair. The fliers say the Smith-9th closure is going to mean longer wait times for the B61: “Can we afford to wait 30 to 40 minutes for a bus?” It also says people should ask the MTA to bring back the B77 and have it run through the Battery Tunnel.
Smith-9th Closure Slated for Late June [Brownstoner]