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Fortis sealed the deal. After a multiyear acquisition process fraught with controversy and litigation, developer Fortis Property Group closed on the sale of the former Long Island College Hospital, according to Crain’s. Fortis purchased the LICH complex for $240,000,000 from the State University of New York.

The deal encompasses about 20 existing buildings in Cobble Hill — roughly 542,000 square feet of space — and brings Fortis one step closer in its plan to build four high-rise residential towers and other developments at the site. Members of the local community opposed the sale and continue to fight the high-rise construction.

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Roy Sloane, the controversial first vice president and acting president of the Cobble Hill Association, today announced that he is stepping down from the neighborhood organization. Two dozen Cobble Hill residents called for Sloane’s ousting last week and organized a special meeting for September 10 to discuss his departure.

The Cobble Hill Association is in the midst of fighting a plan by Fortis Property Group to built two high-rise residential towers in the neighborhood on the site of the former Long Island College Hospital. Sloane had been representing the CHA in talks with Fortis,  but several members did not believe that he was fighting the development as strongly as he should be.

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The Long Island College Hospital development is beginning to affect neighbor relations. A group of 24 Cobble Hill residents and members of the Cobble Hill Association (CHA) sent out a press release Wednesday calling for the ouster of its first vice president and acting president Roy Sloane.

Some members of the CHA, which staunchly opposed the sale of the former hospital, feel Sloane is not fighting the development as strongly as he should be.

The plans of developer Fortis Property Group — to build high-rise residential towers on the LICH site — have garnered passionate opposition from locals who feel the buildings will be out of scale with the surrounding areas. Despite Sloane’s more than 35 years with the CHA, some members feel his private meetings with Fortis are yielding few of the changes the community desires.

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When the Long Island College Hospital closed in 2014 after a 16-month legal battle, Cobble Hill residents weren’t happy. When developer Fortis Property Group officially signed on to buy the former LICH compound a month later, residents weren’t happy. When Fortis revealed renderings in May for the site’s proposed residential development, residents still weren’t into it.

But now, a few of the unhappy inhabitants of Cobble Hill have created a virtual location to lobby for what they do want: NoTowersInCobbleHill.org.

A place for news updates, actionable steps, and donation collection, the “No Towers” site is just the latest in a number of online initiatives helping (and hoping) to shape Brooklyn development.