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It’s another huge week for outdoor music with classical, funk, gospel, hip hop, jazz, a tribute to the Beatles, and two Italian nights. Other options include a new night market, sculpture, story-telling, an e-waste recycling event, an art conference, pie-crumbling, and poetry.

July 16, Queens Night Market, 6 pm to 11 pm. A social event and night market with food, crafts, live performances, and a deejay. Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd.

July 16, SummerStage: Lyricist Lounge, 7 pm. Large Professor, a hip hop producer from Flushing, and Marley Marl, a hip hop producer from Queensbridge, perform. Free. Queensbridge Park, vicinity of 41st Road, 40th Avenue, Vernon Boulevard, and the East River, LIC.

July 16, Alí Bello & The Sweet Wire Band, 6:30 pm. Through the Third Thursdays in Bliss Plaza program, Alí Bello & The Sweet Wire Band present Latin jazz fusion invigorated by Afro-Caribbean musical styles. Free. Bliss Plaza, Queens Boulevard and 46th Street under the elevated 7 train station, Sunnyside.

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Van Morrison, Ms. Lauryn Hill, Met Opera stars, and the Muppets are the world famous celebrities providing entertainment and enrichment in the borough this week. Other possibilities are a LEGO fest, comedy, seniors singing Broadway, a Summer Solstice event, and an International Yoga Day gala. Here’s the rundown.

June 18, Music Under the 7 Train, 6:30 pm. The Street Beat Brass Band presents a multicultural program of brass-based and street-based music from various parts of the world. Free. Bliss Plaza, Queens Boulevard and 46th Street under the 7 train station, Sunnyside.

June 18, Big Band Music, 6:30 pm. New York City Swing plays big band favorites by Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, and Duke Ellington. Free. Queens Library’s Howard Beach Branch, 92-06 156th Avenue, Howard Beach.

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The Who will rock to town as a highlight of an incredibly musical week that includes a symphony, an international event, Ed Sheeran, jazz, and even a festival for people who play the saw. There are also opportunities to enjoy Latin dance, European films, walking tours, and fly fishing. Here’s the rundown.

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On September 17th, 1787, the U.S. Constitution was signed by a majority of delegates at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. One framer, Rufus King, had traveled to the Pennsylvania event from his family farm in Jamaica, Queens. The statesman’s career was only beginning at the time, and he went on to serve four terms as a U.S. Senator and seven years as an ambassador to Great Britain while also building a reputation as an ardent opponent of slavery. On September 17th of this year, the King Manor Museum, which is located on the grounds where Rufus once lived, will host a naturalization ceremony to welcome roughly 75 new citizens to their new country. These immigrants will take their oath in the shadow of a Founding Father’s home and swear to support the U.S. Constitution on the 227th anniversary of its signing. During a ceremony conducted by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the new Americans will listen to the National Anthem, watch a color guard present Old Glory, and then proceed into King Manor to sign their names to a replica of the U.S. Constitution and take photos next to a life-size statue of Rufus King.

Details: Citizenship Day 2014, King Manor Museum, King Park, 150-03 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, free, BY INVITATION ONLY, contact Kathy Forrestal at Education@kingmanor.org.

Photos: King Manor Museum

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History repeats itself in Queens this weekend. On Saturday and Sunday, the King Manor Museum — the former home of Rufus King, a signer of the United States Constitution, a senator from New York, and an ambassador to Great Britain — will host Craftsmen Days. With help from artisans dressed in time costumes, visitors will learn about 19th century crafts like broom-making, tin-smithing, and wood-turning, while also enjoying music featuring instruments such as a hammered dulcimer, fiddle, and banjo. On Sunday, the Vander-Ende Onderdonk House, the oldest Dutch Colonial stone house in New York City, will open Picnic Days. Visitors will be able to enjoy the beautiful architecture, gardens and picnic area, and take tours.

More information and three additional photos are on the jump page.

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Decisions, decisions, decisions and decisions. Or to be more specific: science, kites, film noir and eggs. There are some great options for family fun, entertainment and enrichment in the borough tomorrow, April 19th. It’s probably easiest to list them in bullet form.

  • Doktor Kaboom! This loveable nut performs original interactive “science comedy” for audiences of all ages. Blending the dramatic with the wonders of scientific exploration, the Good Doktor (above) keeps the crowd riveted with interest and rolling with laughter going on a sidesplitting journey of increasingly spectacular (and often successful) experiments designed to involve, excite, educate, and entertain. Back by popular demand, he returns to Queens Theatre (14 United Nations Avenue South, Flushing Meadows Corona Park) for 1 pm and 3 pm shows on Saturday$14 per ticket or $100 for a Family Series Flex Pass (10 tickets to use however you want.)
  • Let’s Go Fly a Kite! It’s National Kite Month, and the King Manor Museum (150-03 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica) is offering a chance to learn about these objects that can be used for scientific discovery, fun or design. Attendees will create, decorate, fly and take home kites. Noon to 3 pm, free.
  • Spring Egg-Stavaganza! Easter weekend at Queens Botanical Garden (43-50 Main Street, Flushing) is known for two things: blooming flora and egg hunts. Due to popular demand, there will be two sessions that will include games, crafts, scavenger hunts and prizes. noon to 1:30 pm and 2 pm to 3:30 pm, $5.
  • The Real Mann! Hollywood legend Anthony Mann was one of the greatest directors of two genres that seem very disparate: film noir, featuring nocturnal and claustrophobic dramas; and the Western, with dramas set against wide-open landscapes. The Museum of the Moving Image (36-01 35th Avenue, Astoria) launches an eight-film retrospective on Mann with two movies on Saturday. T-Men at 4 pm is about treasury agents who go undercover to penetrate a gang of Los Angeles counterfeiters. Raw Deal at 7 pm tells the story of a woman who helps spring her boyfriend from a state prison so they can flee to South America. If these movies inspire, the museum will screen two more —  The Great Flamarion and Border Incident — on Sunday.

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Update: Please note that this lecture is sold out. However, Andy Brennan will participate in another cider event at The Queens Kickshaw in Astoria during NY Cider Week: www.thequeenskickshaw.com Plus, the next King Manor lecture is about Abraham Lincoln in November: http://bit.ly/1aqQola

Apple cider was an extremely popular beverage in the U.S. from colonial days to the mid-19th century. Served hot or cold, fermented or fresh, it was safer to drink than water, and much easier and cheaper to produce than beer or wine. Queens was a center of cider production during these times as it was the birthplace of the Newtown Pippin, a fleshy-but-tart green and yellow apple that is still cultivated for cider today. No place was juicier than the King Manor in Jamaica, where the King family produced over 500 gallons of cider some years. With urbanization, industrialization and waves of beer- and whiskey-loving immigrants from Germany, Eastern Europe and Ireland in the late 19th century, cider’s popularity fell. But recently, cider production has made a comeback, especially in New York State. This Sunday, Andy Brennan from the Aaron Burr Cidery will offer a free lecture on cider at King Manor. Of course, he will enhance his presentation with plenty of samples.

Details: The History of Cider-Making in New York, King Manor Museum, 150-03 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, October 13th, 3 pm, free.

Photo by Love Your Reflection

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The weekend comes with plenty of music and seasonal festivities. There’s a brand new musical and outdoor festival in Flushing, an orchestra show in Jamaica, and an autumn fair in Bayside.

Image source: Queens Theatre

Ella: A Swingin New Musical about the First Lady of Song – This musical about the life of the legendary Ella Fitzgerald debuts today at the Queens Theatre in Flushing. Starring Tina Fabrique, a Tony-nominated veteran of Broadway, the play is set in 1966 and focuses on an older Ella looking back at her life and singing all her famous hits. The Queens Theatre will also hold a reception on Friday 9/28 from 6-10pm with dinner, cocktails, and a meet-and-greet with the cast. Tickets cost between $25 and $49; the reception is $85.

Image source: Porres.org

Old Hock and Bach – Take part in this very “classical” event at the King Manor as the Queens College Baroque Ensemble performs the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Accompanying the music will be a variety of German white wines, the modern version of “Old Hock” listed in Rufus King’s 1822 wine cellar inventory. Cocktails are at 6pm, followed by the concert at 6:30pm. Tickets are $25; RSVP here.

Image source: gailf548 on Flickr

National Estuaries Day Festival – This free annual festival at the Alley Pond Environmental Center celebrates the environmental importance of Little Neck Bay, the local estuary. There will be scenic hikes, live music and activities for children, as well as educational booths and exhibits from neighborhood organizations. Head over for games, hands-on demonstrations, as well as boat and canoe rides.

Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Autumn Moon Festival – The Queens Botanical Garden is holding this celebration of the traditional Chinese and Vietnamese holiday reflecting on the summer harvest. Bring a picnic blanket and settle in for moon cakes, arts and crafts, and cultural performances.

If by any chance we missed your favorite regular or upcoming event, please let us know!