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After two years of planning, it looks like the Pulaski Bridge bike lane promised for this year will be delayed until sometime next year at least, Streetsblog reported.

A year ago, the city approved DOT’s plan to convert one lane of Brooklyn-bound car traffic on the Pulaski Bridge into a bikes-only path with separate lanes for Queens- and Brooklyn-bound bikes. Construction was supposed to start in the spring and wrap late this year (at the latest). But construction has not yet begun, and the city is still reviewing the final bid from the contractor. A spokesman for Assembly member Joe Lentol, who has been lobbying for the bike path since 2012, told Streetsblog that it’s “unlikely” work will start by the end of December.

Pedestrians and cyclists currently share the narrow path, with traffic going both ways in the same lane, creating hazardous conditions for everyone. Reconfiguring the traffic lanes is also expected to calm car traffic on McGuiness Boulevard by slowing down drivers as they come off the bridge.

As soon as the contractor gets the green light from the city, the DOT will announce a new construction timetable. Incidentally, the state is contributing $2,500,000 to the project with federal funds, and the city is contributing $625,000.

Pulaski Bridge Bikeway Likely Delayed Until Next Year [Streetsblog]
City Says Yes to Pulaski Bike Lane [Brownstoner]

Photo by NYC Tom

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After a cyclist struck and killed a pedestrian in Central Park, the 78th Precinct is rolling out ways to get cyclists in Prospect Park to slow down and stop for pedestrians at lights. Park Slope Stoop attended the precinct’s local community council meeting last night, where the cops said they’re going to set up portable stop signs and pedestrian-activated signals manned by officers during the day starting Saturday, October 4.

When cyclists stop at the signs, officers will remind them to stop for pedestrians at the signals and give out a flyer noting the 25-mile-per-hour speed limit. Eventually, Captain Frank diGiacomo said, if cyclists don’t stop for pedestrians, cops will pull out their radar guns and start giving out tickets.

“A summons blitz is just going to piss off a bunch of people, so education first,” he said. “But we’ll go there if we have to.”

Prospect Park Safety in the Spotlight Again Following Deadly Crash in Central Park [Park Slope Stoop]
Photo via Park Slope Stoop

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There’s something special about a bicycle shop. From the attentive service and professional advice, a pro bike shop can outfit you with the custom bipedal ride of your dreams. Proper fitting and selection is always an issue, so you want the right bike for the job at the right size whether off-roading, touring, or just a joyride. But let’s face it: frequent use can lead to a lot of wear and tear, sometimes wheels get dented or pedals fall off. Rest assure, most large and small shops are full service offering a variety of assistance after the sale from tune-ups to parts replacement and repair whether for adults, kids, or professional cyclists.

It doesn’t matter if you’re cycling the entire Queens Green Belt or simply commuting to work, there’s a professional bicycle shop each with it’s own style, specialization, and deals so shop around. The weather outside is getting warmer and it’s time to ride. Visit one of these shops for a great experience:

  • Roberts Bicycles. For over forty years Roberts Bicycles of Bayside has been outfitting the community with hand-built models and a wide selection from BMX to mountain bikes to baby bikes and everything in between. Roberts Bicycles has something to suit the most consummate tastes including helmets and apparel. Trained technicians are on staff to answer your questions and guide you through the selection process.

 

  • Peak Bikes. Offering free tune ups for life, Peak Bicycle Pro Shop of Douglaston focuses on the mountain bike crowd. Walk in and staff are eager to talk up bikes while the cycling community often gather here to organize rides in nearby Cunningham Park. Order a custom model, or restore your childhood cruiser.

 

  • Spin City Cycle. Located in Forest Hills, Spin City Cycles encourages customers to come in for a test ride on all of their models. With cycling being such a popular activity in Queens, sometimes a repair shop can be backlogged, so for those eager to get back in the saddle minus the wait, Spin City promises to repair your bicycle in 48 hours or less.

 

  • Bellitte Bicycles. You can’t go wrong shopping at the oldest bicycle store in the United States. Since 1918, Bellitte Bicycles of Jamaica has been family owned and operated offering 5,000 models to choose from. Service is a top priority at this huge shop but their low price guarantee is known to draw in customers for over 90 years.

 

  • Tony’s Bicycles. Tony’s Bicycles of Astoria has an excellent track record in the cycling community. All of their mechanics are factory trained and certified by companies like Trek, GT, Cannondale, Giant, and many more. Founded in the 1970’s, this bicycle shop is known for their commitment to value and service.

 

  • Bike Stop. While visiting Bike Stop you’ll find a wide selection from BMX to road bikes, even bicycles built for two. An eclectic staff offers expertise from different specialties all the while promising the only thing you’ll have to worry about is peddling. The site offers a comprehensive newbies guide to just about every subject ranging from parts and accessories to how to guides such as a buyer’s guide to rechargeable lighting systems.