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Here’s a four-unit brick townhouse on the Columbia Street waterfront that’s being marketed as an investment opportunity, and we have to say we agree with this approach. There’s no detail left to speak of, although the interior looks cleanly renovated, and it’s only half a block from the noisy and dirty BQE. (Though there are also lots of nice restaurants and shops nearby as well as river views.) The rent roll is $120,000; all the leases are market rate and expire within nine months, according to the listing. For a $2 million ask, does it all add up?
79 Carroll Street [Realty Collective] GMAP P*Shark

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Realty Collective just listed four units at 118 President Street, a brownstone on the Columbia Street Waterfront. The press release says: “The 100-year-old brownstone was gut renovated in 2012 into four two-bedroom, two-bath condos of more than 1,000 square feet each, with working fireplaces, oversized kitchens with white Caesarstone countertops and under-counter lighting, and priced between $799,000 and $1,295,000.” You can see more interior shots here. Do you like the remodel? Not bad if you prefer modern finishes.
118 President Street Listings [Realty Collective] GMAP

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Two restaurants opened this week on the Columbia Street Waterfront. Says our tipster: “Columbia Waterfront may yet be in the early stages of a food and drinking destination renaissance. Those in the know are scrambling to lock in leases on the street early in the wave, say some some observers close to the scene. As the success of Pok Pok has demonstrated thus far, people will find you if it’s that good!” Waters Edge Diner opened at 214 Columbia Street on Monday. The owner plans to serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. Maybe the best news is that the diner will open early, at 6 am. The second opening this week is Chio at 117 Columbia Street, in the former Casa di Campagna space. The New York Times wrote a brief on the restaurant, saying “The healthful Mediterranean notion that meat and fish should be mere condiments on plates of vegetables and grains will be put into practice by Alex McWilliams, the executive chef at this new Italian place in Brooklyn.” Anybody been to either place?

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The Word on Columbia Street posted a petition Columbia Street Waterfront residents are circulating about the traffic speed outside Van Voorhees Park. Here’s a snippet of their concerns: “The vehicle traffic at the increasingly busy intersection of Hicks and Congress Streets, specifically along the West side of the BQE intersection is a cause of large concern for everyone in the neighborhood… We feel, at minimum, there is a critical need for a stop sign and two speed bumps on Congress Street between Columbia Street and Hicks Street.” You can read the full proposal and sign the petition here.

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The lot at 255 Columbia Street, the former Sokol Bros. Furniture store, may remain empty for a little while longer. The Department of Buildings hit the developers with a Full Stop Work Order a few weeks ago because the work being done requires a new building permit, which developers do not have. (Looks like the developers only filed for a partial demolition permit and were planning on building something new with alteration permits only.) Last week the DOB lifted the Full SWO to a Partial SWO, which allows grouting but no other work. The developers will need to get new building permits in place before major construction begins. This situation is similar to the demolition at 200 Smith Street, a lot in Carroll Gardens that remains empty more than a year after its SWO.
Sokol Brothers Building on Columbia Street Leveled [Brownstoner] GMAP

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The empty lot at 14-18 Carroll Street, just off the Columbia Street Waterfront, recently sold for $1.55 million. According to a press release from Ideal Properties, who represented the seller, the lot has more than 7,000 square feet of space. We’re told that the new owner, under the guise of 251 Columbia LLC, has not decided yet if the development will be rentals or condos. GMAP

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After the news last October that Michael Sokol had closed the business sold the building at 255 Columbia Street that had housed his family’s furniture business for over six decades to a Manhattan-based developer for $3.3 million, it was only a matter of time until the building was torn down. (Actually, it was three buildings–three brownstones that had been combined–between President and Carroll Streets, according to Lost City.) “It’s just time to go,” Sokol told the Brooklyn Paper at the time. Go he did, and now the building is gone too. A tipster emailed in this photo this morning of the demolished site. GMAP