South Midwood Tudor Standalone With Plasterwork, Retro Kitchen, Garage Asks $2 Million

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This detached Tudor holds a few surprises on the interior and comes complete with coveted off-street parking. While the fair bit of brown wall-to-wall carpeting might not be everyone’s idea of a pleasant interior surprise, the late 1920s single-family in South Midwood also has a Tudor Revival-style strapwork ceiling and woodwork in the living room. The wood floors elsewhere also suggest there might be more original floors to be found underneath the current shaggy coverings.

The architect is unknown, but the house was constructed by 1928 and the first owners were John F. and Mary Dreyer. John was a real estate man and may have been behind the construction of the residence. Along with his brother-in-law Henry W. Dreyer, A. W Schmidt and Henry A. Meyer, he was one of the founders in the 1890s of the Germania Real Estate Improvement Company, which transformed former farmland throughout Flatbush into new suburban communities. This house is typical of the very popular revival style of the 1920s with a peaked roof, asymmetrical massing, oriel window and picturesque half timbering.


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It’s been in the same family since at least the 1980s, and while the interior has an eclectic mix of decor, what is shown in the handful of listing photos appears in good repair. The first floor holds the large living room with the aforementioned ceiling as well as a fireplace with a Tudor arch set into a wall of wood paneling. There is also a formal dining room with a built-in corner cupboard and, off the kitchen, there’s an office (likely a former maid’s room) and full bath.

The eat-in kitchen brings to mind the dazzling one at the Louis Armstrong House in Queens with its lacquered turquoise cabinets and formica counters. Those cabinets were produced by Brooklyn-based Kingsway Builders Specialties, Inc. as part of a renovation of the entire home started by Lucille Armstrong and Morris Interiors in 1968. (The archivally curious can find invoices for the renovation in the online collection of the museum.) The Armstrong’s kitchen knobs, likely provided by William Hunrath Co., are the same as those in this house but some of the details here, like the scalloped trim and the venting at the kitchen sink, leave one to suspect an earlier kitchen was given a bit of an update rather than a complete overhaul.

Upstairs are three bedrooms, all with carpeted floors, along with two full baths. One of the bedrooms has an original mantel with brick surround while the largest bedroom has a bay window and shares a Jack and Jill bathroom with the third bedroom. None of the bathrooms are shown in the listing photos, so whether or not they have any original vintage features is unknown.

The finished basement, with a tile floor and mirrored wall, has laundry, a recreation room, half bath and storage space.

The house is on a generous corner lot and there is a bit of a side yard in addition to the paved patio behind the detached, two-car garage and the driveway. The garage continues the Tudor Revival theme with its own peaked roof and half timbering.

It is listed with Melanie M. Kishk of Century 21 MK Realty for $2 million. Worth the ask?

[Listing: 2304 Foster Avenue | Broker: Century 21 MK Realty] GMAP

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

interior of 2304 foster avenue

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exterior of 2304 foster avenue brooklyn

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