After being spotted this week checking out bachelor pads in Manhattan, it appears comedian Chris Rock has sold his Beaux Arts style carriage house, located at 239 Waverly Avenue in the Clinton Hill Historic District, for $3.35 million, which was $500,000 under the asking price.

News of the sale was first reported by 6sqft.

239 Waverly Avenue in 2015. Photo by Christopher Bride for PropertyShark

239 Waverly Avenue in 2015. Photo by Christopher Bride for PropertyShark

The home, a former Rental of the Day, was built in 1899 by architects Escher & Escher, according to the designation report. It is faced with Roman brick with limestone trim, and the interior has exposed ceilings, dark wood floors and stained glass windows.

It also has a private two-car garage.

Photo by Douglas Elliman

Photo by Douglas Elliman

Rock purchased the home in 1994, not long after he left the cast of “Saturday Night Live” and two years before his first major HBO comedy special, “Bring the Pain,” made him a household name.

He has been renting it out since 1996, according to the New York Post, and it last listed for rent in July 2013 for $7,950 a month.

Photo by Douglas Elliman

Photo by Douglas Elliman

Although born in South Carolina, the comedian moved with his parents to Crown Heights before relocating to Decatur Street in Bed Stuy, where he was raised and which formed the basis for his semi-autobiographical television show, “Everybody Hates Chris.”

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The history of Brooklyn’s coastline comes to life through the sights and sounds of its workers, families and activists.

“Waterfront,” a multimedia exhibition at the Brooklyn Historical Society’s Empire Stores location in Dumbo, is the result of four years of research. Video, sculptures and interactive installations allow visitors to explore different facets of the coastline’s past.

Warehouse workers, circa 1920, Underwood & Underwood. Courtesy of Brooklyn Historical Society

Warehouse workers, circa 1920, Underwood & Underwood. Image via Brooklyn Historical Society

An eight-minute film called “At Water’s Edge” details more than 20,000 years of waterfront history through 10 distinct moments, while “History in Motion” allows people to “enter” historic paintings, interact with the figures, and create 60-second videos starring themselves.

The exhibition also includes tales of local oystermen, oral histories of female Navy Yard dock workers and the freedom struggle of three enslaved residents who lived along the shoreline.

Eberhard Faber boxing and labeling department, circa 1920. Image via Brooklyn Historical Society

Eberhard Faber boxing and labeling department, circa 1920. Courtesy of Brooklyn Historical Society

Focusing on the present day, a video installation called “Rising Waters” allows visitors to confront debates about climate change and rising sea levels through the words of historians, scientists, activists and others.

The exhibition opens on Saturday, January 20 at the Brooklyn Historical Society’s second location at Empire Stores in Dumbo. For more information on the event, click here.

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This five-bedroom, three-bath townhouse sits in the middle of one of Brooklyn’s most desired brownstone neighborhoods, Boerum Hill. Located at 12 Wyckoff Street between Court and Smith streets, the roomy space offers a rustic-modern vibe and indoor-outdoor living.

The parlor floor is the center of the home, with an open plan kitchen and living area leading out to a terrace and down to a landscaped garden. Indoors are exposed beams, touches of reclaimed barn wood, sliding barn doors and a doorway with swings.

Upstairs are three bedrooms and a full bath with a tub. The master bedroom overlooks the serene garden and features a huge walk-in closet measuring 10 feet by 7.5 feet. A washer/dryer is tucked into a hall closet on this level.

The garden floor has its own entrance and kitchen, and can be used for guests, an in-law suite or additional living space. Two bedrooms can also serve as offices or for storage. The open plan living-dining-kitchen makes a convenient family room.

Court and Smith Street are less than a block away, with shops and eateries such as Trader Joe’s, Shelsky’s and Pacific Green Gourmet. The F and G trains at the Bergen Street stop are less than two blocks away. Well regarded public and private schools are also close at hand.

Listed by Rebecca Bales of Brooklyn Bridge Realty, the townhouse is asking $9,000 a month.

[Listing: 12 Wyckoff Street | Broker: Brooklyn Bridge Realty] GMAP

Brooklyn townhouse for rent Cobble Hill 12 Wyckoff Street

Brooklyn townhouse for rent Cobble Hill 12 Wyckoff Street

Brooklyn townhouse for rent Cobble Hill 12 Wyckoff Street

Brooklyn townhouse for rent Cobble Hill 12 Wyckoff Street

Brooklyn townhouse for rent Cobble Hill 12 Wyckoff Street

Brooklyn townhouse for rent Cobble Hill 12 Wyckoff Street

Brooklyn townhouse for rent Cobble Hill 12 Wyckoff Street

Here’s a nice-looking duplex in a Bed Stuy townhouse, with three bedrooms and a deck. It’s the upper two floors of a three-story Neo-Grec brick house that sits at 590 Monroe Street.

Photos are few and show none of the upstairs, but the parlor floor looks bright and pleasant. Floors are new and there’s some original detail, including a mantel, arched niche and newel post.

The kitchen is renovated, with a stone-topped island and a door leading to the deck, which is among the many things not pictured. There’s a laundry room and 2.5 baths, including an en suite master bath.

Save this listing on Brownstoner Real Estate to get price, availability and open house updates as they happen >>

The subway is a bit of a hike; the A/C at Utica and J/M/Z at Gates Avenue are about equidistant.

Listed by Ronit Abraham Delson of Corcoran, who’ll be showing it at an open house Saturday from 12 to 12:30, the unit is renting for $3,600 a month. The garden level is up for rent as well, so for another two grand you can have the whole house, if you choose. Sound reasonable?

[Listing: 590 Monroe Street #2 | Broker: Corcoran] GMAP

Brooklyn Apartments for Rent in Bed Stuy at 590 Monroe Street
Brooklyn Apartments for Rent in Bed Stuy at 590 Monroe Street

Brooklyn Apartments for Rent in Bed Stuy at 590 Monroe Street

Brooklyn Apartments for Rent in Bed Stuy at 590 Monroe Street

Photo by Nicholas Strini for PropertyShark.

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An affordable housing lottery has opened for 140 units at a six-story building at 23 India Street, not far from the Greenpoint ferry landing.

Of the 140 units, there are 35 studios, 35 one bedroom units and 70 two bedroom units, starting at $613 and topping out at $1,230.

The lottery is set at an area median income range between 40 and 60 percent. Eligible incomes will range between $22,903 and $57,240 for households numbering between one and four people.

The project’s developer is Palin Enterprises, according to building permits. They are also behind the 40-story residential tower at 21 India Street, just a few steps down the block.

Ismael Leyva Architects, the same firm working on 21 India Street, designed the building.

21 India Street via Ismael Leyva Architects

21 India Street via Ismael Leyva Architects

The site was formerly the home of Metro Shipping & Warehousing Inc., which sold the building in 2006.

Preference will be given to residents of Community Board 1, municipal employees and applicants with visual, hearing or mobility impairments. The building, which is smoke-free, includes a community room, interior courtyard and a laundry room on every floor.

Photo by Christopher Bride via PropertyShark

23 India Street in 2014. Photo by Christopher Bride via Property Shark

Applications must be submitted by March 19. Apply through NYC Housing Connect. To learn more about how to apply for affordable housing, read Brownstoner’s guide.

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“Everything was replaced, except the joists,” said Alexandra Barker of Gowanus-based BFDO Architects of the interior of this century-old house, which had been overrun by feral cats before its new owners, a young family, took it on. “It’s probably one of the most extensive guts I’ve done.”

The house is a two-story wood-frame with a bay window in front and an existing extension on the main floor; only the newel posts, handrails and spindles on the staircase were salvageable.

All else is new here, including the treads and risers, the white oak floor, and every wall, door and piece of trim. All the windows were replaced as well.

Find your Brooklyn design inspiration

It was all done on a “super-tight budget,” Barker said. The biggest splurges were the glass pocket doors with divided lights that close off the front room and the tiles in the kids’ bath.

Otherwise, the architect said, “They kept things pretty lean and decided to go for color as an inexpensive statement move. There are no white walls.” Except for the bathrooms, every wall was painted some variety of blue or pale gray.

One of the clients is from Denmark, and had some inherited pieces of vintage Danish modern that were incorporated into the décor.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

A wall-hugging Runtal radiator saves space in the front entry.

The carved newel post is original to the house.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

The periwinkle-blue front room, which doubles as living room and guest room, can be closed off by two new sets of pocket doors. (This also comes in handy at piano-practice time.)

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

The dining room was organized around a Danish modern teak wall unit belonging to the homeowners.

The lighting fixtures, from Eglo, are an inexpensive rendition of a classic of Danish mid-century design.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

The kitchen cabinetry is from Home Depot, instead of the semi-custom kitchen Barker’s office typically does, with a Caesarstone countertop around the perimeter. The center island has a wood top.

The wall along the right includes a coat closet, a powder room and access to the cellar.

A small TV room with a blue velvet sofa is in an existing extension at the back of the house.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

The architects tucked a dedicated work station into a corner of the kitchen.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

Three bedrooms on the house’s upper level include this blue-and-green boy’s room.

All the window moldings in the house are square stock (as opposed to a more detailed profile), the sills exaggerated to become a useful shelf.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

Bisazza mosaic tile enlivens the children’s bath.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

In the pale-gray master bedroom at the front the house, the architects removed a dropped ceiling to gain considerable height.

Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn Barker Freeman Windsor Terrace

IKEA vanities in the bathrooms helped keep the budget in check.

[Photos by Francis Dzikowski]

Check out ‘The Insider’ mini-site: brownstoner.com/the-insider

The Insider is Brownstoner’s weekly in-depth look at a notable interior design/renovation project, by design journalist Cara Greenberg. Find it here every Thursday morning. Got a project to propose for The Insider? Contact Cara at caramia447 [at] gmail [dot] com.

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After receiving a sidewalk violation when street tree roots damaged the bluestone sidewalk in front of their home, homeowners enrolled in the city’s repair program and have been waiting for the issue to be resolved ever since. They’ve been alerted that the repair through the Parks Department’s Trees and Sidewalks Program may finally happen later this year, but they may be putting their house on the market.

Will it hinder a sale to have an open sidewalk violation? Has anyone successfully gotten a repair through the program? How long did it take?

Please chime in with your advice.


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