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Astoria

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This two-bedroom co-op in Astoria has a lot of space, high ceilings, and a lot of light throughout. The building, part of Acropolis Gardens Development, was built in 1923. There isn’t much counter space in the kitchen, but there’s room for a table or a kitchen island.

The N and Q trains are a quick walk down the street, and there are plenty of dining options nearby. There are also multiple grocery store options in the area, and the Bohemian Hall and Beer Garden is a ten minute walk away. The ask is $309,000 with an estimated monthly mortgage of $1,162.43. Click through for more photos.

21-58 35th Street, #5 [Keller Williams Landmark II] GMAP

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There’s a house in Astoria where I’ve always wanted to rent a room, so I could write a gothic horror novel while living there. It’s a Second Empire home with a turret and a porch. It’s seen better days — but more about that below.

The house is nearby one of those intersections that can only occur in Queens: 31st and 31st (street and avenue, respectively). These intersections twixt time and space are thoroughly modern, as in 20th century.

That’s 31-70 31st Avenue in the shot above, but back in 1875 when the house was built, 31st avenue was called “Jamaica Avenue.” And in 1919, it was known as “Patterson Avenue.” It’s simple to explain the confusion: In 1875, Astoria had newly consolidated into the municipality of Long Island City, and in 1919 LIC was newly consolidated into the City of Greater New York. In both cases, the streets were renamed to conform to the new and larger street grids.

More after the jump…

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Merrily We Roll Along begins at the end…and ends at the beginning. The Stephen Sondheim musical, based on a 1934 play by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, tells the story of a once-great Broadway composer who gives up his career and friends to try his hand as a Hollywood producer. 
Both the play and the musical were notable for telling a story in reverse, with the musical version opening in Los Angeles in 1976 and steadily moving backwards to the songwriter’s humble beginnings in 1950s New York. Merrily We Roll Along has a theme close to Sondheim’s heart, how a passion for creating art can be corrupted in the pursuit of success.
The Astoria Performing Arts Center is presenting a 20-show run of Merrily We Roll Along, directed by APAC artistic director Dev Bondarin, from April 30 until May 23. Click through for more information.

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On Tuesday, St. Patrick’s Day, I was doing what you’re supposed to do on that holiday — happily enjoying a pint at my local with an old friend. Then all of a sudden, everything started flashing red. I’d only had a few sips of my first beer at that point, so it couldn’t have been the alcohol. Looking outside, a massive deployment of FDNY personnel were observed, so I grabbed my camera and made apologies to my friend – I had to get to work.

More after the jump…

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Last Tuesday, which you’ll recall as being one of the first days of tolerable weather in months, I decided to go for a little walk right here in Astoria. My destination was St. Michael’s Cemetery, which is found around a mile from HQ. Happily, there was still snow on the ground despite it being the balmy lower 50s – and happier still – it was somewhat overcast so I didn’t have to struggle to control an over abundance of light striking the reflective snow.

More after the jump…

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Yesterday’s storm was officially the moment at which I, for one, have had it with this never ending winter. As my ennui is tantamount to becoming that proverbial monkey shaking a fist at the moon, the only reaction I can offer is that I need to see some bright, saturated color right now or I just might bury myself in the snow and disappear. Accordingly, in today’s post, “Scenes from Queens,” all of which were captured during warmer times.

More after the jump…

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Back in 2013, I wrote a Q’Stoner post about Hallets Cove that offered “Two aboriginal realtors named Shawestcont and Erramorhar (as witnessed by their cohorts Warchan and Kethcanaparan) sold much of what we know as Astoria (but which they called Sintsinck) to William Hallett (who was similarly accompanied by a company of witnesses and countrymen) on August 1, 1664.”

The East River frontage — back then it was called the Sound River — which Hallet purchased had a huge waterbody intersecting with the shoreline from upland properties in what we would now call Ravenswood, and it was called Sunswick Creek.

According to the Greater Astoria Historical Society the name of the waterway can be explained as “A drained marsh near the foot of Broadway. Scholars believe it may come from an Indian word ‘Sunkisq’ meaning perhaps ‘Woman Chief’ or ‘Sachem’s Wife.'” For close to 250 years, Sunswick Creek was practically synonymous with this area of Queens, but what happened to it?

More after the jump…

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Yesterday students from PS 166 and PS 70, city council majority leader, Jimmy Van Bramer and other local politicians participated in a ribbon cutting ceremony at the Broadway library branch in Astoria. With $740,000 in city funding secured by Van Bramer, the library has renovated its Children’s Learning Center, restoring its reading corner and adding new furniture and shelves. It also has a new “mommy and me” corner and new computers as well as other upgrades.

Van Bramer says that he learned to read in the children’s room at the library. In a release, he said, “It is this very space where I learned to dream and dream big and countless kids do the same here every day.”

Work on the library is continuing with renovations of its lower level and meeting rooms as well as the construction of a new Cyber Center.

Photo: Bill Alatriste

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On Saturday a dog daycare and boarding facility opened in Astoria with plenty of upscale offerings for Fido. NYC Pet Services will offer lucky pooches their own private rooms with beds and even small TV’s for overnight stays according to DNAinfo. It also offers dog-walking services, grooming and daycare for dogs. The business recently moved from its home of three years on 24th Avenue. It’s on the second floor of this six-story building that went up in 2006.

Dogs Can Play, Lounge and Watch TV at New Astoria Pet Hotel [DNAinfo]

Photo: Google Maps