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The light-colored brick that will make up the facade is climbing the steel and concrete skeleton at Hudson Companies’ high-rise on Flatbush Avenue in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. The shape and look of the 23-story tower is now visible over the neo-Tudor facades of the recently landmarked Chester Court.

The brick at 626 Flatbush Avenue is up to about the 13th story. The building topped out in January. The architect is Marvel Architects and it should be ready for occupancy early next year.

Click through for more photos. What do you think of the height and look so far?

626 Flatbush Avenue Coverage [Brownstoner]

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Spring house tour season is here again and a number of neighborhoods across Brooklyn will be opening up some of their most stunning houses for anyone to see. Here’s a roundup of the tours coming up over the next month.

The 31st annual Brooklyn Heights house tour will take place on Saturday, May 9 from 1 pm to 5 pm. The self-guided tour, put on by the Brooklyn Heights Association, will showcase five homes. Children under 13 will not be allowed in the houses, except for infants in front packs, and photographs are prohibited. Tickets are $80 and can be purchased here.

The 2015 Park Slope House Tour takes place on Sunday, May 17 from noon to 5:30 pm. Shuttle buses will pick up and drop off at various sites throughout the neighborhood to help people reach all of the homes.

Houses on the tour include two homes designed by architect Charles Pierrepont Henry Gilbert, and an 1875 Neo Grec and many more. (The photo above and the first photo after the jump show two houses on the tour.) After the tour, at 6 pm, local architect-historian Francis Morrone will give a talk titled, “Brooklyn Landscapes: From Green-Wood Cemetery to Brooklyn Bridge Park.” (more…)

Brown Mansion, composite

A look at Brooklyn, then and now.

Finding this great photograph of a long-gone mansion in Flatbush was the easy part. Finding out where it was and who the “Brown” mentioned was would turn out to be a bit more difficult. The only name that could possibly be harder to track would be someone named “Smith.” There were a lot of Browns in Brooklyn, and since there was no date or address, it took some doing, and a bit of luck. But in the end, the mystery was solved.

The location: The Brown mansion was at 694 Flatbush Avenue, near the corner of Parkside Avenue. Although this neighborhood is now called Prospect Lefferts Gardens, in the 19th century it was just plain old Flatbush.

The Lefferts family homestead was nearby, as were the homes of many of Flatbush’s older families. This was a wealthy area, and also a very desirable one. It was close to public transportation, with Flatbush Avenue the major roadway between the harbor at Fulton Landing and the oceanfront at what is now Floyd Bennett Field.

Flatbush remained an independent town and not part of the City of Brooklyn until 1894. It had its own town government, raised its own money for roads and infrastructure and collected its own taxes. Because much of it remained farmland until the 20th century, Flatbush life was very different that the more urban life on the other side of the park.

But that was changing. (more…)

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Tour group Jane’s Walk will explore the architecture of Prospect Lefferts Gardens next month. “Must See PLG: The Prospect Lefferts Gardens Landmarked District in a Nutshell,” will focus on the landmark district, where neo-Renaissance, Romanesque Revival, neo-Federal and Tudor architecture abounds.

Local resident and tour leader Laura Charelian will also discuss controversial new construction, height limits, and new housing options as well.  (more…)

81 Fenimore St. PLG, Composite

A look at Brooklyn, then and now.

Like an archeological dig, Brooklyn is made up of layers. In Flatbush, the fields the Canarsee roamed became cultivated farmland under the Dutch. That in turn gave way to freestanding homes on large plots, which were incorporated into the land deed of Lefferts Manor, and turned into smaller row houses.

That’s what happened here on Fenimore Street, as it happened throughout many Brooklyn neighborhoods, but in this rare instance, we have photographs.

Our period photo shows 81 Fenimore Street. The photograph was taken in 1910. It shows a large wood-framed house on the property. The style was Second Empire, with a central tower with an even taller mansard roof and widow’s walk. The view of Brooklyn from the mansard windows must have been fantastic. (more…)

140 Midwood Street

This classic Renaissance Revival limestone in the Manor has pretty much every original detail and looks to be in immaculate condition. Yes, it has its original built-in icebox, marble sinks in the passthroughs, and even an original copper sink in the butler’s pantry.

Designed by architect George Lawton and built in 1899, it also has wedding-cake plaster details, stained glass, a triple parlor, pocket doors, pier mirror, three mantels and original oak floors, according to the listing. The kitchen is a little monotone for our tastes but would be easy to update with paint, counters, and paneling for the island.

Asking $2,225,000, it’s priced in line with recent record setters in the area. What do you think of the house and the ask?

140 Midwood Street [Brown Harris Stevens] GMAP
Photos via Brown Harris Stevens

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Flatbush is the new hotspot for development in Brooklyn, according to an interactive map put together by Prospect Lefferts resident Jacob Garchik. It catalogues an astonishing 50 new-building projects happening southeast of Prospect Park.

Most of the mapped developments are in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, although they fall into other areas of Flatbush as well. The sites cluster most densely around Clarkson and Church avenues, the heart of historic Flatbush. Dotted with standalone, turn-of-the-20th-century wood frame Victorian and Edwardian houses, the area is also home to many apartment buildings already. (more…)

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A highly anticipated installation at the Flatbush Trees will happen May 18 through May 22, artist Dave Eppley told Community Board 9 last week. Eppley has been working for the last six months with students at a nearby school to design flower bouquets made out of sign vinyl that will be applied to the dilapidated 1970s-era tree sculptures, located at the intersection of Ocean Avenue, Flatbush Avenue and Empire Boulevard, right across from Prospect Park.

Apparently made of concrete and some other weather-impervious material, the tree-shaped sculptures also serve as a street signs and mark a park entrance.

A sign maker by trade as well as an installation artist, Eppley said he does not expect the decorations to last more than a few years, and that is intentional. “I hope another artist will adopt [the Trees] as their own in a year or two,” and do something else with them, he said.

626 flatbush avenue rendering

The partially built 23-story tower at 626 Flatbush Avenue in Prospect Lefferts Gardens has just started taking applications for affordable rentals, according to developer Hudson Companies. Rents for the 51 subsidized units start at $565 for a studio, $607 for a one-bedroom, $736 for two bedrooms and $843 for three bedrooms.

And income requirements range from $19,371 for a single person and go as high as $50,100 for a family of six. Half of the affordable apartments will be reserved for current residents of Community Board 9. (The area covers southern Crown Heights, Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Wingate and part of North Flatbush.) (more…)

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After a year of drama and disruption, last night’s Community Board 9 meeting was relatively sane and productive, but the highly anticipated vote on the controversial letter to City Planning to request a zoning study of Prospect Lefferts Gardens did not happen. Here is what did happen:

*The letter was sent back to the land-use committee for a vote because the previous vote turned out to be invalid. People were voting who weren’t actually members of the committee, and the vote was taken after the meeting had already been adjourned, which is against the rules. We were expecting a presentation on the land-use committee’s recommendation, but perhaps because the matter was sent back to committee for a vote, there was none.

*Acting chair Laura Imperiale and MTOPP leader and activist Alicia Boyd agreed on something: Now there is a new threat to the existing character of the neighborhood — and all neighborhoods in Brooklyn and New York City. A “text amendment” to the building code, buried in Mayor de Blasio’s “Zoning for Quality and Affordability” plan, would effectively wipe out hard-won height limits in “contextual zoning neighborhoods,” allowing new development 20 to 30 percent higher across the board. The board has two weeks to comment.

Also, City Planning plans to meet on the topic today at 4 pm at Spector Hall at 22 Reade Street in Manhattan. A community rally is scheduled to take place before the meeting, at 3 pm at City Hall.

*MTOPP has asked the D.A. to investigate Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams (more…)

163 Fenimore St-Living Room-NYC

This circa-1900 barrel-fronted limestone at 163 Fenimore Street in Prospect Lefferts Gardens has tons of elegant 19th century details and a triple parlor configuration, but it also has a convenient layout. All the entertaining rooms as well as the kitchen are on the ground floor, with the bedrooms above.

There is a hall mirror, mantel, coffered ceiling, built-ins, stained glass windows and oodles of wood work. The one-family house looks to be in very good condition, going by the photos, and the kitchen and baths have been updated. What do you think of it and the ask of $1,500,000?

163 Fenimore Street [Halstead] GMAP

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352-386 Parkside Ave, SSPellen 4Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Two family duplex row houses
Address: 352-386, and 377-409 Parkside Avenue
Cross Streets: Flatbush and Bedford Avenues
Neighborhood: Prospect Lefferts Gardens
Year Built: Around 1910
Architectural Style: Renaissance Revival-Colonial Revival mixture
Architect: Unknown, but perhaps Benjamin Dreisler
Other Buildings by Architect: If by Dreisler, many buildings in PLG, Prospect Park South, Ditmas Park, and other parts of Flatbush
Landmarked: No, although should be

The story: Many years ago, when I first started reading Brownstoner, I became embroiled in online “discussions” about Prospect Lefferts Gardens. I had only been there once, a short trip to one block of the neighborhood to look at a house with my mother. I don’t know where we were, since I did not know the neighborhood. In retrospect, it may have been Maple Street. At any rate, I empathized with the PLG people who were defending their neighborhood’s quality of life and architectural beauty. One day, someone offered to drive me around PLG, and as much as I liked all parts of the neighborhood, I really loved this block.

At the time, this was considered a “sketchy” block (not fond of that word), but it was undeniable that the architecture was superb. I always wondered why this block was not included in the PLG landmark district, as the buildings on this block are more than worthy. Perhaps it’s because of the apartment buildings, or perhaps because it was down market from the other blocks in Lefferts Manor, proper, but it was a huge oversight, in my opinion. (more…)