Fort Greene Apartment for Rent -- 1 Rockwell Place

This loft-style two-bedroom sits within the converted 19th-century warehouse at 1 Rockwell Place in Fort Greene, near BAM, Fort Greene Park and a whole bunch of subway lines.

The distressed wood beams offer both a link to the building’s history and a distinctive feature, adding an industrial-rustic flair to the bright, high-ceilinged living space. The built-in shelving by the entrance is a nice touch as well. (more…)

Fort Greene Brooklyn -- 67 Hanson Pl History

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

When the iconic Williamsburgh Savings Bank Building was being built in 1927, it became a beacon, surrounded by other Art Deco buildings. This apartment building was one of them, dwarfing its brownstone neighbors.

Name: Originally the Doctors and Dentists Office Building; now apartments
Address: 67 Hanson Place
Cross Streets: Corner of South Elliott Place
Neighborhood: Fort Greene
Year Built: 1929
Architectural Style: Art Deco
Architect: W.T. McCarthy and Murray Klein
Other Works by Architects: McCarthy: 13-15 Prospect Park West, Cathedral Arms and Chateau Frontenac apartment buildings in Flatbush, houses in Gowanus and Red Hook, and Concord Village apartment buildings. Klein: Storefront at Ashland and Lafayette (demolished), Avenue U Theater, row of store buildings on Flatbush Avenue near Church Avenue, Times Plaza Hotel on Atlantic Avenue, and apartment buildings in Manhattan.
Landmarked: Yes, part of Brooklyn Academy of Music Historic District (1978)

The Doctors and Dentists Building

This Art Deco apartment building replaced a smaller office building built only 19 years before, in 1910. That six-story building was called the Doctors and Dentists Building, developed by a consortium of physicians and hailed as the first of its kind in Brooklyn. (more…)

Fort Greene Apartment for Rent -- 62 Fort Greene Place

On view today is a one-bedroom floor-through on the parlor floor of a Fort Greene brownstone. Listed by Jerry Minksy and Mina Kim of Douglas Elliman, it’s renting for $3,500 a month.

Which isn’t a great bargain for a one-bedroom, but it’s a nice one, in a nice-looking house. It’s got high ceilings, being on the parlor floor, and generous spaces. (more…)

Brownstone Renovation & Interior Design In Fort Greene Brooklyn

Good thing Park Slope-based designer Jennifer Morris has a background in the hospitality industry. When a couple who’d just bought a four-story, 18-foot-wide brownstone in Fort Greene called her mid-renovation for help “picking out finishes,” she naturally asked, “Where’s your layout?” The reply: “We don’t have one.”

The homeowners had no architect, though demolition and construction were already well under way. The garden floor, where the new kitchen was slated to go, had been gutted, the hallway opened up to the main living space. “They’d never done a renovation before and didn’t know what to ask or anticipate, or what the process should be,” Morris recalled.

Morris enlightened them about design coming before renovation — “not while you’re standing in a gutted space.”

She rolled up her sleeves, cleared her schedule, and created a new layout for all four floors, found a kitchen fabricator, selected materials, finishes, furnishings — “all in lightning speed,” said Morris, a former designer for the Rockwell Group, known for hotels and restaurants worldwide. “Fortunately, my background is ‘We need 500 chairs by tomorrow!’” (more…)

Brooklyn Interior Design: Hilary Robertson's Elegant Vintage Home in Fort Greene

When stylist Hilary Robertson moved to Brooklyn nine years ago, she left behind nearly all of her furniture in England. Finding the right kind of pieces to furnish her new home was initially challenging, but a visit to the Brimfield Antiques Flea Market in Massachusetts proved a revelation.

Robertson’s Fort Greene home isn’t jam-packed with the heavy, dusty cast-offs of other eras. Rather, a carefully curated selection of antiques adds character to the designer’s elegant aesthetic.


666 Fulton St Fort Greene Brooklyn Cast Iron Architecture

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

This corner building is one of seven rare cast iron–fronted buildings built in the commercial center of Fort Greene.

Name: Cast iron–fronted mixed-use building
Address: 666 Fulton Street
Cross Streets: Corner of South Elliott Place
Neighborhood: Fort Greene
Year Built: 1882
Architectural Style: Italianate
Architect: Charles A. Snedeker
Other Works by Architect: Row houses on South Elliott Place
Landmarked: Yes, part of BAM Historic District (1978)

Cast iron–clad buildings began appearing in Lower Manhattan as early as the late 1850s. By the 1880s, they had reached the height of their popularity, with all manner of styles and ornamentation available.

They were touted for being more fire resistant, their construction allowed for larger and greater fenestration, and, let’s face it, they could be gorgeous. The ornamentation and degree of design detail that could be cheaply worked into sheet metal cladding made for beautiful buildings.

New York’s mercantile and commercial strength was made manifest in the cast iron palazzos along Manhattan’s Broadway and SoHo, the Ladies Mile and the buildings of Tribeca. This trend carried over into Brooklyn as well, but in a smaller way. (more…)

Brooklyn Strand Project: Fort Greene Residents Voiced Concerns In Community Workshop

They had to find more chairs. On Monday evening, a group of more than 70 people — architects, city representatives and Brooklyn residents — met at Fort Greene’s Willoughby Senior Center to talk about the future of the neighborhood’s public spaces.

Hosted by Community Board 2 and the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, the workshop was part of the Brooklyn Strand. The multi-year, multi-part effort is spearheaded by the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership and WXY Architecture, and seeks to improve public space around the Brooklyn Bridge and BQE from Borough Hall to Commodore Barry Park.


UrbanGlass: Fort Greene's Enormous Artisanal Glass-Making Studio

Glass is everywhere in our lives — from eyeglasses to screens to windows — but we’re usually looking through it instead of at it. Not so at UrbanGlass, a glass-obsessed non-profit offering studio space in one of the country’s largest glass-making studios, located at 647 Fulton Street in the heart of Fort Greene’s emerging Cultural District.

Here, roughly 200 artists and makers regularly fire up the furnaces to make neon signs, sculpture, beads and blown-glass vessels — all with an eye to exploring glass as a medium for creativity. Brownstoner recently visited the 17,000-square-foot facility, which is closed to the public.

Read on for a look inside.


BAM North Site II

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and other local pols held a ceremonial groundbreaking Tuesday to kick off construction at 15 Lafayette Avenue in Fort Greene. The long-in-the-works project is also known as BAM North Site II and the Brooklyn Cultural District Apartments (BCD:A).

The mixed-use, mixed-income building will include both residential units and cultural space. The 109 apartments, 40 percent affordable and 60 percent market rate, will sit atop 21,400 square feet of cultural space, which will house The Center for Fiction and Mark Morris Dance Group, among others.



Our house of the day is a four-story Fort Greene brownstone, but it’s more than that. It is, and we’re quoting the listing here, a transitional French Second Empire neo-Grec-style historic brownstone. Listed by Corcoran broker Rodolfo Lucchese, it’s located at 374 Vanderbilt Avenue.

It’s got much of what you’d want in such a brownstone — tall arched doorways, pocket doors, parquet floors with inlay borders, moldings, medallions and plaster details. It’s got bay windows and three wood-burning fireplaces with original marble mantels. And it’s a generous 21 feet wide. (more…)

Robert Graves Wallpaper Company Brooklyn History

A look at Brooklyn, then and now.

If you’ve ever restored an old house and come upon 19th- or early-20th-century wallpaper, it could have been made by the Robert Graves Company of Brooklyn.

Between 1843 and 1929, the Robert Graves Company produced some of the metropolitan area’s finest wall coverings. It did it all: one-of-a-kind commissions and limited editions for interior decorators, as well as more modest mass-produced papers for middle-class homes.

Robert Graves was born in Ireland. Unlike many of his fellow Irish immigrants, he did not arrive on our shores with nothing. His father, Sir William Graves, was a well known artist. Robert came to America as a successful wallpaper manufacturer. (more…)