Family of Worker Killed in Carlton Mews Collapse Located


The widow of the 67-year-old construction worker who was killed in the Carlton Mews collapse has been located and is living in the New York City area, according to the Daily News. Professional Grade Construction, the company that employed Winston Gellett, said it would pay for the  funeral costs, but then reneged on the plan after it discovered widow Deanna Simms had hired a lawyer, Simms said. She was forced to take out a loan for $11,500 to cover the costs of a grave, a casket, minister, musician, hearse and various other items, she added. Gellett emigrated to the U.S. from Jamaica in the 1980s, according to Simms. He worked in construction, and also at Kennedy Airport as a porter. His children live in Jamaica and will be unable to attend the funeral, she said, which takes place at 4 p.m. today at the Interboro Funeral Home, 544 Evergreen Ave., in Bushwick. The burial is set for Saturday at Rosehill Cemetery in Linden, N.J. In 2006, Gellett’s son Winston Jr. was shot during a robbery in Queens and left paralyzed.
Widow Says Construction Company Broke Promise [NY Daily News]
BREAKING: Major Building Collapse on Carlton Avenue [Brownstoner]

13 Comment

  • Can we say “mean spirited?” So what she got a lawyer? Of course she got a lawyer, her husband was killed while on his job, under circumstances that are still being investigated.

    The man is dead. If they had paid for the funeral like they said they would, it would go a long way to making what will more than likely be a long, drawn out, and acrimonious case go down easier for both parties. And the builders wouldn’t look like the cheap, unsafe, cost-cutting, so-and-so’s they are certainly looking like now.

  • Can we say “mean spirited?” So what she got a lawyer? Of course she got a lawyer, her husband was killed while on his job, under circumstances that are still being investigated.

    The man is dead. If they had paid for the funeral like they said they would, it would go a long way to making what will more than likely be a long, drawn out, and acrimonious case go down easier for both parties. And the builders wouldn’t look like the cheap, unsafe, cost-cutting, so-and-so’s they are certainly looking like now.

  • I think those builders are going to be wishing that they paid the $11,500 when this goes to court.

  • i bet this woman hasn’t talked to her “husband” in twenty years. now she comes out of the woodwork.

    • Even if that were true, if they are married, she’s still his widow. He was killed on the job due to the company’s negligence. Are you saying that if your spouse, (even if you hadn’t seen him/her) had died because of someone else’s negligence, that you would be so noble as to not seek compensation? Your comment is plain rude.

  • What, a 67 year old Jamaican with only two jobs?

    No permits… She’s going to be up against insurance companies… She should hire two lawyers.

  • someone should introduce deanna simms to kickstarter….

  • should be standard practice for ANY company to pay for the funeral costs (at the least) if a worker is killed while conducting business for that company. This should happen regardless of any possible liability/negligence. This company probably has millions in insurance for accidents so it’s unimaginable that this widow had to take
    out a loan for thousands of dollars.

    • I really hope that the developer has to pay some serious damages to that poor man’s family, and I also hope that the rest of the workers on the site got some kind of severance pay. In the longer term, I’d love to see more enforcement of safety guidelines on construction sites. All of us depend on these workers, after all, and it seems like we have a greater obligation to them than this.

    • I really hope that the developer has to pay some serious damages to that poor man’s family, and I also hope that the rest of the workers on the site got some kind of severance pay. In the longer term, I’d love to see more enforcement of safety guidelines on construction sites. All of us depend on these workers, after all, and it seems like we have a greater obligation to them than this.