Three Impressive Homes by Noted Gilded Age Architects, Starting at $1.595 Million

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    If you would like your dream home to have a bit of an architectural pedigree one of these not-so-modest manses from the late 19th century might appeal.

    They are all designed by architects who made a name for themselves during the lavish days of the Gilded Age and offer distinctive exteriors and plenty of room to spread out on the interior.

    They are located in Orange and Dutchess counties in New York and Berkshire County in Massachusetts.

    bruce price cottage tuxedo park

    Fittingly, this Tuxedo Park “cottage” was an architect’s own. Bruce Price, who along with Pierre Lorillard IV, plotted out the vision for the exclusive residential community, designed four cottages on land belonging to his wife Josephine Lee Price. Completed in the 1890s, the houses were inherited by their daughter, author and etiquette expert Emily Post, who sold them off in the 1920s.

    bruce price cottage tuxedo park

    The shingled, Dutch Colonial house at 18 Pepperidge Road has curb appeal, with picturesque gambrel roofs, diamond pane windows and dormers. It sits on just under an acre of land that includes a detached garage.

    bruce price cottage tuxedo park

    Inside are original details including mantels and hardwood floors along with some modern updates, including a renovated eat-in kitchen. There are six baths in total and seven bedrooms — plenty of room for a large family.

    The house is listed with Walter Deane of Tuxedo Park Homes for $1.595 million.

    stanford white carriage house rhinebeck ny

    This Rhinebeck carriage house was designed on a grand scale by architects McKim, Mead and White. The 1890s Georgian-inspired brick structure was constructed as part of The Grove, an 18th century estate that was revamped by its 19th century owners.

    stanford white carriage house rhinebeck ny

    All traces of horses have vanished; the property at 500 Route 308 was converted to a grand single-family home in the 20th century. There are coffered ceilings, multiple mantels and wainscoting, all modern additions. The roughly 7,800 square foot house has six bedrooms and 6.5 baths.

    stanford white carriage house rhinebeck ny

    There’s a gated entry to the almost six acres of land around the house and it includes a pool, grilling area, fire pit and two-car garage.

    The property is listed with Rachel Hyman-Rouse of Gary DiMauro Real Estate for $2.5 million.

    elm court

    Finally, the most expensive on the list is also the grandest of the three. Elm Court was originally built as a summer cottage in the Berkshires for William D. Sloane and Emily Vanderbilt Sloane. The couple hired Boston-based firm Peabody and Sterns in the 1880s to design a Shingle-style home and hired the firm again at the turn of the century to substantially enlarge the property, resulting in a sprawling country home with touches of Tudor style. The original landscape was designed by Frederick Lawn Olmstead according to the National Register nomination and subsequently updated by the Olmsted Brothers.

    elm court

    Located at 310 Old Stockbridge Road in Stockbridge, Mass., the house includes over 65 rooms packed with original details including mantels, built-ins, paneling and plasterwork. The full splendor can be seen in a virtual tour.

    The house sits on almost 90 acres, which includes numerous outbuildings including a caretaker’s house, carriage house, stables and barns. A developer purchased the property in 2012 with plans to restore the property and transform it into a resort but the estate was put back on the market this fall.
    elm court stockbridge ma

    The property is listed with John Barbato of Compass for $12.5 million.

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