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On September 17th, 1787, the U.S. Constitution was signed by a majority of delegates at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. One framer, Rufus King, had traveled to the Pennsylvania event from his family farm in Jamaica, Queens. The statesman’s career was only beginning at the time, and he went on to serve four terms as a U.S. Senator and seven years as an ambassador to Great Britain while also building a reputation as an ardent opponent of slavery. On September 17th of this year, the King Manor Museum, which is located on the grounds where Rufus once lived, will host a naturalization ceremony to welcome roughly 75 new citizens to their new country. These immigrants will take their oath in the shadow of a Founding Father’s home and swear to support the U.S. Constitution on the 227th anniversary of its signing. During a ceremony conducted by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the new Americans will listen to the National Anthem, watch a color guard present Old Glory, and then proceed into King Manor to sign their names to a replica of the U.S. Constitution and take photos next to a life-size statue of Rufus King.

Details: Citizenship Day 2014, King Manor Museum, King Park, 150-03 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, free, BY INVITATION ONLY, contact Kathy Forrestal at Education@kingmanor.org.

Photos: King Manor Museum

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History repeats itself in Queens this weekend. On Saturday and Sunday, the King Manor Museum — the former home of Rufus King, a signer of the United States Constitution, a senator from New York, and an ambassador to Great Britain — will host Craftsmen Days. With help from artisans dressed in time costumes, visitors will learn about 19th century crafts like broom-making, tin-smithing, and wood-turning, while also enjoying music featuring instruments such as a hammered dulcimer, fiddle, and banjo. On Sunday, the Vander-Ende Onderdonk House, the oldest Dutch Colonial stone house in New York City, will open Picnic Days. Visitors will be able to enjoy the beautiful architecture, gardens and picnic area, and take tours.

More information and three additional photos are on the jump page.

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Image Source: Bridge and Tunnel Club

The King Manor takes its name from Rufus King, a member of the Continental Congress, a framer and signer of the U.S. Constitution, one of the first senators from New York State, the ambassador to Great Britain under four presidents and an outspoken abolitionist. However, many powerful, capable and impressive women also inhabited this now-historic house in Jamaica. On March 2 as part of Women’s History Month, Dr. Laura Fishman, former chair of York College’s Department of History and Philosophy, will present a lecture on the ladies of the King Manor Association and its involvement in the Women’s Club Movement. Founded in 1900, this group of dynamic members of the fairer sex broke gender barriers with their civic engagement and efforts at social reform and suffrage.

The King Manor Association and the Women’s Club Movement
King Manor Museum
Rufus King Park, Jamaica Avenue and 153rd Street, Jamaica
Saturday, March 2
3pm – 4pm | Free with suggested $5 donation