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Renderings released Tuesday by Rybak Development at a Community Board 15 meeting show the developer is planning an ambitious mall with condos above as well as a large public plaza in Sheepshead Bay.

The glass-fronted retail space is broken up with zig zagging and horizontal concrete divisions, and the whole thing comes to nearly a point at one corner, like the prow of a ship. (Perhaps the marine look is a reference to the nearby waterfront area.) The architect of 1809 Emmons Avenue is Brooklyn-based Zproekt.

The renderings were first published by Sheepshead Bites. The developer plans eight stories with 50 to 60 condos. Rybak will need a zoning variance to build that many apartments, which is where the big public plaza comes in.

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Community group Save the View Now this week sued developer Toll Brothers and Brooklyn Bridge Park over the height of the Pierhouse hotel and condos, now under construction in Brooklyn Bridge Park. The group alleges the height of the buildings has illegally violated the park’s own General Project Plan. State Supreme Court Justice Lawrence Knipel issued a temporary restraining order preventing construction on a section of the development south of the Squibb Bridge, the group announced Thursday.

The details are complex, but suffice to say at issue is whether or not the three-building condo and hotel development at 60, 90 and 130 Furman Street in Brooklyn Bridge Park is blocking views of the Brooklyn Bridge in violation of any laws.

Brownstoner broke the story in September that the northernmost part of the development, 1Hotel at 60 Furman Street, has angered preservationists because it is, in fact, blocking a view of the Brooklyn Bridge a 2005 agreement between the park and another community group, the Brooklyn Heights Association, sought to protect.

But — whether or not the height of the three buildings violates any laws is another question — and one this lawsuit seeks to answer.

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Now taking applications for seven affordable rentals: 96 Brooklyn Avenue. If you’ve spent any time in north Crown Heights, you’ve probably seen this eye-catching 1880s Queen Anne building. Designed by noted 19th century Brooklyn architect firm Parfitt Brothers, it’s landmarked but has crumbling and hidden under overgrown shrubbery for years.

Nonprofit housing developers NIA JV LLC and ELH Management LLC acquired it in 2013 with plans to turn it into seven affordable rentals and restore the exterior as per LPC requirements, as we detailed at the time. (ELH Management also handled the award-winning restoration of Montrose Morris’ Imperial Apartments on the corner of Pacific Street and Bedford Avenue in Crown Heights.)

Also now taking applications are seven more affordable rentals in other historic buildings in Crown Heights and Bed Stuy, as this online notice from HPD and New York City Housing Connect details. The deadline to apply is May 13.

Rents range from $877 a month for a studio to $1,541 for a three-bedroom. Income requirements range from $36,680 for one person to $120,240 for a household of six. Check out the online notice for more details on rents and income.

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In a major about-face, Community Board 8 wants to rezone an industrial area in northern Crown Heights to allow residential buildings. It would allow taller buildings and require subsidies for the housing, to make it affordable to those earning the median in the area.

The board voted yes Thursday to send a request to City Planning to study the area for a rezoning, DNAinfo reported. Readers may recall that a similar request from neighboring Community Board 9 has been bogged down in controversy for more than a year.

This is a major change of direction for the board, which a few years ago rejected an attempt by a group of artists to create artist-owned live-work housing in a building in the area. The board wanted to keep the area industrial to limit gentrification in the area.

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Salvation Army is selling off another Brooklyn building. The former warehouse and stable at 22 Quincy Street is in contract as of yesterday, for an amount around $30,000,000, we hear. The ask was about that, and there were multiple bidders.

As far as we know, it is an off-market transaction. The buyer was not revealed.

Given the price, it will likely be made over into a residential building, our source speculated, despite its enormous footprint and relative lack of windows. The building is 70,158 square feet and is over FAR, so demolition is unlikely. It is not landmarked.

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Brooklyn City Council members Brad Lander and Stephen Levin have joined with the Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and one other City Council member in sponsoring a bill that would speed the landmark review process. The process would move online with a public database showing all actions taken by the Landmark Preservation Commission and the ability to submit applications for landmarks online, according to a story in The Real Deal.

The bill would also require the LPC to respond more quickly, with a 90-day limit for feedback on applications for individual landmarks and 180 days for proposed historic districts. “Unresolved” cases would have to be jettisoned after five years.

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Big news: The original cement facade of the Coignet Building, not been seen in decades, is now visible at the corner of 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street. The uppermost story of netting that has shrouded the landmark at 360 3rd Avenue in Gowanus for about a year as it undergoes restoration came down sometime in the last few days. We snapped these photos yesterday as we were passing through the area.

The red brick veneer applied sometime in the mid-20th century has been removed, per the restoration plans. It looks to us as though the restorers are planning to add a top coat of cement to finish and seal the exterior. Perhaps this explains why some of the netting has been removed.

The historic restoration of this landmark is certainly not finished, as more photos below reveal. The front stoop has greatly deteriorated in the last year, since the scaffolding went up — perhaps a result of this unusually snowy winter.

Whole Foods, which is handling the restoration as part of a deal to build its adjacent store, is also stabilizing the interior. Click through to see behind the fence.

Coignet Building Coverage [Brownstoner]

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The windows and facade are in but the balconies are still under construction at 61 Park Place in Park Slope. A filing last month for a division of the property into two tax lots reveals the building will be condos.

Inside, the drywall appeared to be up, at least in the units we could see from the street. The five-story building will have 17 apartments, as previously reported.

There will also be parking for 15 cars, nine bicycles, a day care facility in the cellar, and an 81-square-foot “community facility,” according to the Schedule A. The architect is Shiming Tam, and the developer is Brandon Hornbeck.

It’s been under construction since 2013 and is supposed to wrap in the next few months, according to a sign posted on the construction site. Click through for more photos and the previously published rendering.

61 Park Place Coverage [Brownstoner] GMAP

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The long-empty and neglected Ridgewood Masonic Temple — it’s on Bushwick Avenue in Bushwick, despite the name — is going to become apartments. In January, the developer filed plans for an addition and conversion to 28 apartments at at 1054 Bushwick Avenue, The Brooklyn Eagle reported. Nataliya Donskoy of ND Architecture and Design is the architect of record.