by

Many times have I shown you Cool Cars, Queensicans.

There was the Zombie Response Jeep in Astoria/Woodside, the Cool Cars of Astoria and Industrial Maspeth, that 1949 Plymouth on the Woodside/Maspeth border over by Mt. Zion cemetery, and that nearly perfect 1957 Pontiac Star Chief encountered on 38th avenue in Astoria. Cool Cars, but all production model automobiles.

What I saw the other day on Jackson Avenue at the corner of Queens Street was some sort of bizarre chimera, however.

by
1

One day last spring, I was walking down Jackson Avenue towards Astoria when I found myself in the midst of a flock of pigeons who were pecking away at the sidewalk and doing – y’know – pigeon stuff. Nothing unusual about that, and the sort of thing that New Yorkers barely even notice. What grabbed my attention, however, was that one of these critters was sporting plumage of the scarlet and golden variety, which is decidedly uncommon. A fancy that this might be some sort of Buddhist Monk Pigeon or X-Man was entertained briefly, but then again I’m sort of an idiot.

More after the jump…

by
1

The 5Pointz story has been all over the web for the last few weeks, including here at Brownstoner Queens, and it is just sad that the structure has already been stripped of the graffiti artwork which once made it remarkable.

I guess it’s the way of things, here in New York City, and the 1892 vintage factory will be excised in the near future. Observationally, it was the single largest “draw” in LIC for foreign tourists (and even jaded New Yorkers) and it will be missed. A composition of saturated color that brightened the urban landscape, which incurred reflection in viewers, is always appreciated.

Once upon a time though, specifically before the Second World War, there was no color and the entire world was black and white. Rising out of this monotone landscape was the Neptune Meter Company of Long Island City.

by

It’s the late 19th century, and the Great Hunger (aka Potato Famine) is ravaging Ireland. The British occupation, poverty and religious strife are also causing extreme social unrest. However, life is pretty good for Joshua Minnitt, an English justice of the peace whose family owns more than 1,000 acres of land in Tipperary. But then Minnitt marries a Catholic woman, and his father disinherits him. Unfettered, Minnitt carries on, dedicating his life to improving living conditions in his community. On Aug. 1, a historical movie on his life, The Minnitts of Anabeg, will make its U.S. premiere at the New York Irish Center in Long Island City. The film’s writer and director, Alan Brown of Krown Films, will attend the screening and participate in a Q&A afterward.

Details: The Minnitts of Anabeg, New York Irish Center, 10-40 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Aug. 1, 7:30 PM, $15/$8 for students, seniors and the unemployed, tickets are limited, please RSVP to Chris at chris@newyorkirishcenter.org or 718-482-0909.

Photo: The Minnitts of Anabeg

by
2

Long Island City never ceases to amaze. As its name suggests, it was formed as a city in 1870 before incorporating into the Big Apple 18 years later. For much of the early 1900s, the Western Queens neighborhood was a commercial hub with bakeries, factories and a Pepsi bottling plant. Fast-forward 100 years, and LIC is one of the city’s hottest real estate markets with high-rise luxury residential complexes competing for East River views. Mitch Waxman never ceases to amaze, either. The Newtown Creek Alliance historian can discuss everything from LIC’s derelict smokestacks to its great coffee shops. Waxman, who blogs at The Newtown Pentacle, will lead a two-hour tour of LIC’s Modern Corridor this Saturday. He will discuss the area’s industrial past, modern luxuries and extensive rail system and share the sordid story of its last and most infamous mayor, “Battle Ax” Gleason. Details: Modern Corridor Walking Tour, meet at Albert E. Short Triangle Park, corner of Jackson Avenue and 23rd Street, LIC, July 13, 10 am, $20.

by

It’s U-shaped, surrounded by tall concrete walls and within earshot of the 7 train — and it’s the place to be. On June 29th, this former schoolyard will host the first MoMA PS 1 Warm Up 2013 party of the summer. Every Saturday until September 7th, roughly 5,000 hipsters, party animals and international tourists will flock to the MoMA PS1 courtyard for cutting edge music (dance hall, juke, dubstep), modern art and out-of-the-box fun. The above-ground kiddie swimming pool, imported sand and chaise lounges are nice too. Now in its 16th year, Warm Up combines elements of outdoor rave with gallery show and street fair, but to regulars, it’s just another Saturday with friends. Details: Warm Up 2013, MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave., LIC, Saturdays from June 29 to Sept. 7, 3 pm – 9 pm but doors open at noon, $15 in advance/$18 day-of. Click here to buy tickets.

by
1

These guys honor tradition while breaking the mold. Jameson’s Revenge combines the sounds of a pin whistle, a fiddle, a flute and a guitar to create a funky, almost sweet-sounding form of Irish music that recalls a modern day in the Old Country. This Saturday, the lads take their act to Long Island City, where they will share the stage with 2012 Irish Music Awards winner Mickey Coleman, a folk singer from County Tyrone in Northern Ireland whose lyrics are influenced by the hardships that he experienced growing up in a country divided by religion. Details: Jameson’s Revenge in Concert, New York Irish Center, 10-40 Jackson Ave., LIC, June 29, 7:30 pm, $22, $11 for students, seniors and the unemployed.

by

Irish eyes — and ears — will be smiling. The Guggenheim Grotto, consisting of County Mayo natives Kevin May and Mick Lynch (above), has created a genre fans describe as “folk-influenced indie pop.” The duo, which won a 2007 Independent Music Award with the song “A Lifetime in Heat,” likes to mix harmonies with piano instrumentals and intricate acoustic guitar hooks. This Friday, these lads will share the stage with Cathy Maguire, a singer, songwriter, model and TV presenter from County Louth. With a style honed in Nashville with help from Cowboy Jack Clement, Maguire (below) has a bluegrass style and stunning stage presence. Details: The Guggenheim Grotto and Cathy Maguire in Concert, June 14, 7:30 pm, New York Irish Center, 10-40 Jackson Ave., Long Island City, $25/$15 for students, seniors and the unemployed.

by

 

Image Source: Vicesome
Combining storytelling, history and the arts, the Five Boro Story Project seeks to strengthen community connections, preserve local history, and boost pride in NYC neighborhoods. The nonprofit’s newest series, I’m Tawkin Here: Storytelling with a New Yawk Accent, kicks off on April 10 at the New York Irish Center before traveling through the five boroughs on five consecutive Wednesdays until May 8. The show features Broad Channel native Tara Clancy, a fifth-generation New Yorker and the Moth GrandSLAM storytelling champion whose solo show “Channel Rat” was featured in the NY Fringe Festival. LIC’s Kambri Crews, a storyteller, public speaker and author of Burn Down the Ground, is scheduled to perform, as are Rockaway’s Ed Shevlin, an Irish speaker, Fulbright Commission for Summer Language Study winner and part of the heroic sanitation team that that cleaned up the Rockaways after Hurricane Sandy, and Howard Beach representative Angel Yau, a comedienne extraordinaire with Upright Citizen’s Brigade and Mortified! storytelling. Jamaica’s SoSoon of Mi-6, an emcee, songwriter and the self-proclaimed “Spike Lee of hip hop” is in charge of the music.

I’m Tawkin Here: Storytelling with a New Yawk Accent
New York Irish Center
10-40 Jackson Avenue, LIC
Wednesday, April 10
7:30pm – 9pm | Free

by

Image Source: New York Irish Center

Cork County native Donie Carroll began his musical career during the great Irish ballad boom of the 1960s. Within a decade, his solo career as a traditional folk singer and entertainer took off, with annual residencies at seaside resorts and small festivals on the Emerald Isle. In the early 1990s, he moved to New York City, where he became a legend at Kate Kearney’s, a now-closed Manhattan bar, eventually joining the Washington Square Harp and Shamrock Orchestra. On February 22 at the New York Irish Center in LIC, Carroll will jam with other Irish musicians, dancers and skilled storytellers in a night for lovers of Irish music and culture.

An Evening of Irish Music and Dancing

New York Irish Center

10-40 Jackson Avenue, LIC
Friday, February 22nd, 2013
7:30pm – 10:30pm | $15