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Brownstoner takes on Brooklyn history in Nabe Names, a series of briefs on the origins and surprising stories of neighborhood nomenclature.

Gravesend Neck Road in 1879. Photo via the Brooklyn Historical Society

Tucked between Coney Island Avenue and Kings Highway, Gravesend is just across a creek from Coney Island, but the neighborhoods are starkly different.

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Postcard via Andrew Porter

In the early 20th century, this block of Montague Street between Clinton and Court streets was a bustling real estate and insurance district. Today, many of the older buildings are gone but the strip is still dominated by banks and lending institutions.

Check out these vintage postcards of the block courtesy of Brownstoner reader Andrew Porter — and get a blast from the past.

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Everything ends up here eventually, but Made in Brooklyn is a column exploring native, born-and-bred borough creations.

55 Washington Street. Photo via the Etsy Blog

The cardboard box may not seem innovative in 2016, but in 1879 it was ahead of its time — and initially conceived as an accident, on the watch of one of Dumbo’s early business leaders and developers.

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Brownstoner takes on Brooklyn history in Nabe Names, a series of briefs on the origins and surprising stories of neighborhood nomenclature.

The New Utrecht Reformed Church at 16th Avenue and 84th Street in 1925. Photo via the Brooklyn Historical Society

Nestled among a conglomeration of southwestern Brooklyn neighborhoods — Dyker Heights, Flatbush, Midwood, Gravesend, Borough Park and Bath Beach — Bensonhurst houses both a dwindling number of Italian-American residents and a growing Chinese population.

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Brownstoner takes on Brooklyn history in Nabe Names, a series of briefs on the origins and surprising stories of neighborhood nomenclature

Dyker Heights’ 13th Avenue in 1934. Photo via Bowery Boys

An isolated residential nabe, Dyker Heights is known for its large Italian-American population and distance from subway stations.

Despite much of the ‘hood’s relative inaccessibility, Dyker Heights still attracts an outpouring of locals and out-of-towners alike to its renowned Christmas lights display, an annual tradition in which residents deck their mansions in illuminated Santas and snowflakes.

But can you guess how it got its name?

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Hotel Bossert. Postcard via Andrew Porter

The Hotel Bossert has been one of the finest buildings in Brooklyn Heights since its opening more than a century ago. This year, after many months of renovations, the glamorous Bossert will begin accepting guests once more.

Until you can enjoy it in person, check out this set of vintage postcards — courtesy of longtime Brownstoner reader Andrew Porter — that show the hotel in its heyday.

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Brownstoner takes on Brooklyn history in Nabe Names, a series of briefs on the origins and surprising stories of neighborhood nomenclature.

Golden City Amusement Park in 1922. The park was razed to make room for the Belt Parkway in 1939. Photo via brooklynpix.com

Deep within the alphabetized grid that characterizes Brooklyn’s southern residential realms, Canarsie is still steeped in the awnings and accents of another era in the borough’s history.