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There will be no swaying palm trees or tiki bars stocked with fruity rum drinks, but attendees will definitely see their fair share of multi-colored Hawaiian shirts and maybe even a few straw hats. On Wednesday, Parrotbeach, arguably the world’s best Jimmy Buffet tribute band, will give a free concert in Forest Hills. Part of an annual series sponsored by Maspeth Federal Savings, this New Jersey-based group will play timeless classics such as “Cheeseburger in Paradise,” “Margaritaville” and “Tin Cup Chalice,” while the crowd gets nostalgic about past beach vacations. Concert-goers can also expect to hear other “island music” favorites, such as Harry Belafonte’s “Jamaica Farewell.”

Details: Jimmy Buffet Tribute Band Parrotbeach, Maspeth Federal Saving Bank Parking Lot, 101-09 Metropolitan Avenue, Forest Hills, July 24, 7:30 pm, free but first come, first seated.

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Finally a Father’s Day gift he will really appreciate! This Sunday at the Queens Botanical Garden, a unique, talented, completely local group will play songs composed by present and former borough residents. Expect Quintet of the Americas (above) to perform jazz by Louis Armstrong (Corona) and classical and symphony pieces by Soong Fu-Yuan (Briarwood), James Cohn (Douglaston), Beata Moon (Forest Hills) and Morton Gould (Richmond Hill). The band might also try sounds from Harry Potter and Star Wars by John Williams (Flushing). The concert kicks off QBG’s Music in the Garden series, which will feature live performances of Balinese, Irish and Arab genres. Details: Quintet of the Americas, QBG, 43-50 Main St., Flushing, 2 pm to 3:30 pm, $4.

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Here’s an attractive prewar apartment for sale on the sixth floor of 77-35 113th Street in Forest Hills. The three-bedroom apartment has a corner exposure and original hardwood floors and other original details. The kitchen has been attractively renovated but the bathrooms feel a little dated. The monthly maintenance is $1,452 and the asking price is $555,000.
77-35 113th Street [Douglas Elliman] GMAP

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Image Source: ict4us

What is the meaning of human life? This phrase, of course, is the essence of many existential conversations, but it is also the name of a book by Raymond A. Belliotti. The Distinguished Teaching Professor of Philosophy at SUNY Fredonia has also written the thought-provoking tomes Happiness is Overrated, Roman Philosophy and the Good Life, Stalking Nietzche and Good Sex. On April 22, Belliotti will discuss the meaning of life at the Central Queens Y. Part of the human condition, this Harvard Law School grad with a Ph.D. from the University of Miami argues, is that the questions most important to us evade answers and instead underscore the limitations of human reason. Seriously confronting such questions threatens our mundane lives. Belliotti purports that the meaning of life is best understood through two metaphors: telescopes and slinky toys. Find out what he means on Monday.

Central Queens Y
67-09 108th Street, Forest Hills
Monday, April 22
1:30pm – 3pm | $6 suggested donation

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Image Source: Guardian
In 2009, Afghanistan passed a law giving Shia men the right to deny their wives food if the women don’t obey their sexual demands. (Shia is a version of Islam.) This legislation also required women to get permission from their husbands if they wanted to work and granted legal guardianship of children to the fathers and even grandfathers, instead of mothers. However, in 2010, advocates were successful in passing the Elimination of Violence Against Women Act, which strengthens sanctions against various forms of violence against women, including making rape a crime for the first time under Afghan law. On April 15, Naheed Bahram will discuss women’s rights in this war-torn country during a special presentation at the Central Queens Y. Bahram, Queens chapter program director for NY Women for Afghan Women — which supports literacy, job education and health care while respecting Afghan traditions and practices — left Afghanistan after the loss of her mother in a bomb explosion in Kabul. Her family migrated to Pakistan, where she graduated from high school and taught English at refugee camps. In 2004, Bahram moved to the U.S., and started working for NY WAW as an intern and volunteer in 2007. She graduated from Queens College in 2011 and currently works full time for NY WAW.
Central Queens Y
67-09 108th Street, Forest Hills
Monday, April 15
1:30pm – 3pm  | $6 suggested donation

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Image Source: Quintet of the Americas

The borough’s past and present will sound so beautiful. On April 9, Jamaica’s Center for Mediation Services will host Queens-based musicians who will play songs celebrating composers who once lived in the world’s most diverse county. The program will feature “Wind Quintet” by Beata Moon (Forest Hills), “Quintet No. 2 for Winds” by James Cohn (Douglaston), “The Stuff of Comets” by Dylan Glatthorn (Astoria) and “Sincerita” by Christopher Caliendo (Jackson Heights). But the beat goes on. The concert will include music by past residents, including jazz by Louis Armstrong (Corona), the classical music of Soong Fu-Yuan (Briarwood), rags by Scott Joplin (buried in East Elmhurst), “Pavanne” by Morton Gould (Richmond Hill) and music from the Harry Potter films by John Williams (Flushing).

Center for Mediation Services
89-64 163rd Street, Jamaica
Tuesday, April 9
1pm – 2pm  |  Free

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Image Source: Marione Ingram/Facebook

The term “rough childhood” is an understatement. Marione Ingram was born in Nazi Germany in 1935. During World War II, neighbors told the Gestapo that her mother was Jewish. Soon thereafter, her father was beaten and pressured to divorce his mother before being coerced into working for the Luftwaffe in Belgium.

It only got worse. Ingram, age 8 at the time, and her mother escaped death camps because their city, Hamburg, was firebombed and after being denied access to air raid shelters, they were presumed dead. They survived about 18 months in hiding, dealing with constant fear and hunger. In 1952, Ingram immigrated to New York City and observed discrimination against African Americans. Impelled by her own experiences, she became a civil rights activist and jumped back into dangerous living.

During the 1960s, she worked on voter registration in the South and opened a Freedom School in Mississippi. Harassment and threats ensued, and the school was eventually torched by the Klu Klux Klan. Today she is a writer who has been published in Best American Essays and a fiber artist who has exhibited in Europe and the United States. On April 8 at the Central Queens Y, Ingram will discuss her life and memoir, The Hands of War, in an informal setting with light refreshments.

Talk by Holocaust Survivor who Risked her Life Post-World War II as a Civil Rights Activist
Central Queens Y
67-09 108th Street, Forest Hills
Monday, April 8
1:30pm – 3pm  | $6 suggested donation

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Image Source: NRHZ.DE

Mary Fulbrook grew up hearing about Udo Klausa, a family friend, good neighbor and civilian administrator in the small town of Bedzin, Poland. His wife, Alexandra, was Fulbrook’s godmother. As an adult living in England, Fulbrook discovered that Udo had been a Nazi functionary who had faithfully followed orders that led to the herding of 85,000 Jews to slave labor camps and gas chambers. She uncovered Udo’s past by chance, leafing through old letters that her mother had received from Alexandra, who wrote of dead Jews lying in the streets of their hometown. On March 28 at the Central Queens Y, Fulbrook, a professor of German history at London’s University College, will talk about her new book on the topic, A Small Town Near Auschwitz. Her story is scary because it was so commonplace. Udo is one of thousands of low- and middle-level government functionaries across the Third Reich who considered themselves to be decent humans, but also facilitated the Holocaust. Without their diligent cooperation, the Nazi leaders would not have been able to carry out their massive murderous plans.

Professor to Discuss Book on Family Friend Who Turned Out to be a Nazi Functionary
Central Queens Y
67-09 108th Street, Forest Hills
Thursday, March 28
1:30pm – 3pm | $6 suggested donation

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Image Source: Quintet.org

UPDATE: THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO AN EMERGENCY SURGERY. IT WILL BE RE-SCHEDULED AND THE NEW DATE WILL BE PROMOTED.
Queens will sound so beautiful. On March 23, the Flushing Branch Library will host borough-based world musicians who will play songs by past Queens residents. The program will feature woodwind quintets by Beata Moon (a resident of Forest Hills) and James Cohn (Douglaston), The Stuff of Comets by Dylan Glatthorn (Astoria), tangos by Christopher Caliendo (Jackson Heights) and the premiere of a new work based on Tibetan influence by Xinyan Li (Flushing). But the beat goes on. The concert will feature music by past residents including jazz by Louis Armstrong (Corona), rags by Scott Joplin (who is buried in St. Michael Cemetery in East Elmhurst), Pavanne by Pulitzer Prize-winner Morton Gould (Richmond Hill), music from the Harry Potter films by Academy Award-winner John Williams (Flushing) and William Grant Still’s theme song for the 1939 Worlds Fair.

 

Flushing Branch Library
41-17 Main Street, Flushing
Saturday, March 23
2pm – 4:30pm|Free