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This three-bedroom, two-bath in Elmhurst is part of a four-story building that was built this year. The kitchen has all new appliances with a peninsula for extra counter space. The apartment looks like it gets a lot of sunlight. The building already has Verizon FiOS installed, and there are surveillance cameras. The monthly rent is $2,600.

There are schools and parks nearby in the area. Woodside Avenue has many restaurants, cafes, and bars to choose from. There is a grocery store around the corner, and there are small shops a few blocks away. The E, F/M, R, and 7 trains are less than a 10-minute walk away, and the Woodside LIRR is about a 20-minute walk or a five-minute drive. The Q32, Q33, Q47, Q49, Q53, and Q70 buses are all within walking distance too. Click through for more photos.

73-10 Woodside Avenue, #2 [East Coast Realtors Inc.] GMAP

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This rental in Elmhurst is a very spacious three-bedroom, part of a two-story house built in 1930. The apartment looks newly renovated with wood floors in the bedrooms and living room and tile in the kitchen and bathroom. The monthly rent is $2,100 and heat and hot water are included.

The Q29 and Q58 are on the same block, and the 7 train is about a 15 minute walk away. There are grocery stores, restaurants, and small shops in the area. Click through for more photos.

48-11 92nd Street, #2 [Keller Williams Landmark] GMAP

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The ongoing battle over which borough has the best restaurants will have a friendly skirmish during Queens Taste 2015 in Corona on May 12. More than 50 restaurants, dessert makers, and beverage providers are getting ready to provide samples of their products to an expected 800 attendees at this annual celebration, which will take place at the New York Hall of Science this year. More information and more foodie photos are on the jump page.

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There was a time when some Irish people thought that New York City streets were paved with gold. Well, on Sunday, a Sunnyside/Woodside thoroughfare will be filled with innumerable Emerald Isle natives and many other marchers during the St. Pat’s For All Parade. This 15th annual event was founded in response to the never-ending conflict over openly gay participation in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Manhattan. Thus, organizers of the Queens march emphasize the diversity of the Big Apple’s Irish and Irish American residents, especially the LGBT community. Beyond the ethnic groups, expect such entities as the Sunnyside United Dog Society, the Ethical Humanist Society of Queens, and veterans agencies.

Details: St. Pat’s For All Parade, Skillman Avenue from 43rd Street in Sunnyside to 56th Street in Woodside, March 1st, 1 pm (assembly and remarks), 2 pm (step off), free.

Bonus details: Lunar New Year, Queens Center Food Court, 90-15 Queens Boulevard, Elmhurst, February 28th, noon to 6 pm, free. Events include a martial arts demonstration with Kung Fu Master Long Fei Yang, Korean and Japanese drummers, tea tastings, and the Dragon Dance. The first 200 people who bring an event social media post (like this one) will receive a red envelope with a prize.

Photo: St. Pat’s For All

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Over on Queens Boulevard, in Elmhurst, you’ll notice the First Presbyterian Church of Newtown at the corner of 54th Avenue. It’s the Gothic structure which is incongruous with its surroundings, which are mainly retail shops, a diner, and a medium sized shopping mall. The First Presbyterian Church of Newtown is one of the oldest congregations in the entire city, and certainly the oldest in Queens. Pictured above is the latest building to serve the organization, erected in 1895, the first iteration having been built in 1652.

In 1652, men dressed like this.

The exterior shots in this post are from a couple of weeks ago, from when the missus and I went couch shopping. A few years ago, I had an opportunity to set up a tripod inside the church, so there are lots of interior shots after the jump.

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It’s part Cascanueces, part Shchelkunchik, and mostly unique. This Saturday, four local performing arts schools will offer two presentations of a decidedly Queens version of The Nutcracker. Expect some ballet, of course, but be prepared for plenty of salsa, Arabian belly dance, Chinese jazz, hula hoops, and hip hop. The companies  — Mestizo Art CenterCali SalsaEC Squared Studio; and Uruzua Queens Center of Performing Arts — are all located in the heavy Hispanic neighborhoods of Jackson Heights, Corona, and Elmhurst, so there will be a Latin flair with a mix of solo and group acts.

Details: The Nutcracker (Queens Version), Queens Theatre, 14 United Nations Avenue South, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, December 27th, 4:30 pm and 7 pm, $20 suggested donation.

Photo: Uruzua Queens Center of Performing Arts

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It’s no secret that delicious bounty abounds in the borough. In fact, just last week QNS Brownstoner informed on two Restaurant Weeks that are set to take place this month: an entire Queens one and a Sunnyside promotion. Well, now it appears that the cup is overflowing as two additional cuisine celebrations were recently scheduled for next week: a Taiwanese vegetarian fest and a Thai pop-up gig. More info on jump page.

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Not too long ago, I answered my wife’s query of “Where are you going today?” with the simple answer of “Newtown, the center of Newtown.” She’s used to puzzling archaisms at this stage of the game, so she asked “Elmhurst?” and I said, “Yes, Elmhurst.”

Off I went and before long one arrived at the navel, as it were, of ancient Queens.

From “Historic Churches of America” by Nellie Urner Wallington, courtesy Google Books:

Of the Dutch Reformed families in early New York many removed from time to time beyond the limits of New Amsterdam securing for themselves broader sections of land for tillage and among them a number of such families settled in Long Island where they formed the hamlet of Newtown. Unable to support a minister and to maintain a church building of their own they joined hands with others of the same faith at Flushing and for a number of years worshipped there until December 2 1731 when a meeting of the resident members in Newtown was called to form plans for the establishment of a church organisation of their own and to devise means for the erection of a house of worship upon land contributed by Peter Berrien.

More after the jump…

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World War I was brewing, Babe Ruth was pitching for the Boston Red Sox, and the Panama Canal was welcoming its first steamboats when George Winfield Schwagerl joined Troop 17 of the Boy Scouts of America in 1914. The 39-year-old letter carrier was the first scoutmaster of the newly founded Elmhurst branch, and he wrote on the application that working with boys was therapeutic because he had lost a son. Fast-forward to 2014 and there are roughly 1,000 Troop 17 alumni scattered throughout the United States, including Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. This Saturday, the Queens Botanical Garden will host a special scouting expo as part of Troop 17’s 100th anniversary celebration. Plans include demonstrations related to backpacking, camping, canoeing, compass skills, fishing, orienteering, rafting, rock climbing, and wilderness survival. Plus, there will be an extensive indoor display of Troop 17’s scouting artifacts, slides, and videos. And of course, all uniformed scouts who participate will receive an event patch regardless of their troop affiliation.

Details and photos after the jump.