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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

What’s in a name? Brooklyn’s most famous newspaper franchise was known under a host of different mastheads during its long and illustrious history. It started life in 1841 as The Brooklyn Eagle, and Kings County Democrat, was renamed The Brooklyn Daily Eagle and Kings County Democrat in 1846, and shortened to The Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1849. In 1938, the name was further shortened to Brooklyn Eagle, which remained its name until it went under after a lengthy newspaper strike in 1955.

The Brooklyn Eagle grew to be one of the most respected newspapers in the country, and in fact was the most popular afternoon daily newspaper in the United States at one point. Its editors included such notables as Thomas Kinsella, St. Clair McKelway, Cleveland Rogers, Frank D. Schroth, and Charles Montgomery Skinner. And, of course, Brooklyn’s great poet, Walt Whitman.

Photo of Brooklyn Daily Eagle office via Wikipedia.

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This post courtesy of Explore Brooklyn, an all-inclusive guide to the businesses, neighborhoods, and attractions that make Brooklyn great.

You don’t have to believe in the supernatural to find Brooklyn haunting. The borough has been inhabited by humans for thousands of years and was settled by Europeans 350 years ago. It has been the site of a major Revolutionary War battle. That adds up to a lot of potential ghosts. So there is no shortage of spectral stories. Below are some ghost stories for this spooky season.

The Brooklyn Public Library (Prospect Heights) Central Branch took 29 years to build. It occupies 2.8 acres of land, has a 189-seat auditorium, houses over a million cataloged books, magazines, and multimedia material, and welcomes more than 1 million visitors each year. Librarians there tell a spooky story about a six-year-old girl who disappeared within its walls more than 40 years ago. (The story has since been exposed as a playful Halloween hoax, but for those of you who want to believe, you can learn more about Agatha Cunningham here.)

Library photo by Whatever Happened to Agatha Cunningham? via Facebook.