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The Department of Transportation plans to “launch” the long-awaited Pulaski Bridge bike lane project at a community meeting tomorrow. The DOT will present its plans at 6 pm at MoMA P.S. 1 at 22-25 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City.

Last we heard about the Pulaski bike lanes, construction was delayed until sometime next year. But last month, the DOT announced that it had found a contractor and work would wrap by spring 2015. When it’s finished, there will be a two-way bike lane and a dedicated pedestrian lane. To create the bike lane, the agency will cut three lanes of Brooklyn-bound traffic to two lanes.

Rendering via DOT

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After two years of planning, it looks like the Pulaski Bridge bike lane promised for this year will be delayed until sometime next year at least, Streetsblog reported.

A year ago, the city approved DOT’s plan to convert one lane of Brooklyn-bound car traffic on the Pulaski Bridge into a bikes-only path with separate lanes for Queens- and Brooklyn-bound bikes. Construction was supposed to start in the spring and wrap late this year (at the latest). But construction has not yet begun, and the city is still reviewing the final bid from the contractor. A spokesman for Assembly member Joe Lentol, who has been lobbying for the bike path since 2012, told Streetsblog that it’s “unlikely” work will start by the end of December.

Pedestrians and cyclists currently share the narrow path, with traffic going both ways in the same lane, creating hazardous conditions for everyone. Reconfiguring the traffic lanes is also expected to calm car traffic on McGuiness Boulevard by slowing down drivers as they come off the bridge.

As soon as the contractor gets the green light from the city, the DOT will announce a new construction timetable. Incidentally, the state is contributing $2,500,000 to the project with federal funds, and the city is contributing $625,000.

Pulaski Bridge Bikeway Likely Delayed Until Next Year [Streetsblog]
City Says Yes to Pulaski Bike Lane [Brownstoner]

Photo by NYC Tom

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After a cyclist struck and killed a pedestrian in Central Park, the 78th Precinct is rolling out ways to get cyclists in Prospect Park to slow down and stop for pedestrians at lights. Park Slope Stoop attended the precinct’s local community council meeting last night, where the cops said they’re going to set up portable stop signs and pedestrian-activated signals manned by officers during the day starting Saturday, October 4.

When cyclists stop at the signs, officers will remind them to stop for pedestrians at the signals and give out a flyer noting the 25-mile-per-hour speed limit. Eventually, Captain Frank diGiacomo said, if cyclists don’t stop for pedestrians, cops will pull out their radar guns and start giving out tickets.

“A summons blitz is just going to piss off a bunch of people, so education first,” he said. “But we’ll go there if we have to.”

Prospect Park Safety in the Spotlight Again Following Deadly Crash in Central Park [Park Slope Stoop]
Photo via Park Slope Stoop

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Community Board 8’s Transportation Committee voted last night to install four new bike corrals in front of bars and restaurants on Vanderbilt and Washington avenues in Prospect Heights. The corrals will bring bike parking to three bars on Vanderbilt: Bar Chuko on the corner of Pacific Street, Milk Bar at Prospect Place (pictured) and Branded at Bergen Street.

Bar Corvo is also slated for a bike corral on the corner of Washington Avenue and Lincoln Place. The whole board still has to vote before it’s a done deal, but approval is likely.

Photo via Jane Kim Design

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Get a free bike helmet today and bike around Brooklyn’s historic landmarks this weekend with Brooklyn Public Library’s Bike the Branches event. BPL is hosting a helmet fitting and giving away free helmets today at the Central Branch at 10 Grand Army Plaza from 4 to 6:30 pm.

And on Saturday, kids and adults can bike to all 60 of BPL’s neighborhood libraries and participate in various special events. African dancing and folk tales at Clarendon Library in Flatbush, puppet-making for children at the Brower Park branch in Crown Heights, and a Slavic Soul party in Sheepshead Bay are just a few on the long list of events taking place all over Brooklyn.

The library has also posted 12 themed bike routes that highlight Brooklyn’s historic places, including landmarked architecture, breweries and distilleries, literary sites, and early settlements. You can register for Saturday’s bike tour here — tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for children or seniors. All the proceeds go towards maintaining and upgrading the library’s branches.

Photo by Brooklyn Public Library via Brooklyn Based

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Image source: Seth W. on Flickr

Trying to get around has been crazy this week, with hurricane-related transit issues, and many people have been biking to work. It’s a great time to bring up the topic of bike sharing again, for those of you who wish you could get around on two wheels. Unfortunately, the Citi Bike program, which will bring about 10 bike rental stations to Long Island City, hasn’t gotten up and running yet. Now it is slated to launch in March 2013.

There’s another option in the meantime: renting bikes from your neighbors using Liquid.

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Image source: Seth W. on Flickr

Kissena Park in Queens is home to the only velodrome (a bicycle racing track) in all of New York state – and one of only 27 in the country. The outdoor Kissena Velodrome (GMAP), which is 400 meters around and has banked curves, is a major hub in the city for the sport of track cycling.

Track cycling is completely different from road racing, mountain biking, or riding around the neighborhood. First of all, the bikes used for the sport are fixed-gear, AKA “fixies,” without any brakes, meaning that the rider doesn’t stop pedaling until he or she wants to stop moving.

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Image source: rollingrck on Flickr

The Kosciuszko Bridge, which spans Newtown Creek to connect Brooklyn and Queens on the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, is going to be rebuilt starting in the spring of 2013. The $460 million project was fast-tracked to begin a year earlier than originally planned, and is expected to be finished in the summer of 2016, according to the New York State Department of Transportation.

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Image source: NYCStreets on Flickr

Now that it’s a little cooler, some of you might be starting up your exercise regimen again. Or perhaps you’ve been working out all along. So where do you like to exercise? Are you an outdoor activity enthusiast, an indoor gym fan, or maybe you’re even a swimmer? Let us know your practices in the comments or via twitter at @queensnycity!