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The New York State Pavilion has a tremendous history and an uncertain future. Designed by legendary architect Philip Johnson and built for the 1964 World’s Fair, it once had 100-foot columns suspending a 50,000 square-foot roof with multi-colored panels. It also boasted three towers (measuring 60 feet, 150 feet, and 226 feet, respectively) and a 26-foot replica of the St. Lawrence hydroelectric plant. Then there was Texaco’s map of New York State with 400-pound terrazzo mosaic panels. An estimated 51 million walked through it.

After the World’s Fair, the site was a concert venue — the Grateful Dead and the Rolling Stones played there — and even a roller rink. But it experienced years of neglect and abandonment until People for the Pavilion, an advocacy group, was launched about three years ago.

This Sunday, the Queens Historical Society will screen Modern Ruin, a documentary that was written, directed, and edited by Matthew Silva, who co-founded People for the Pavilion.

Details: Modern Ruin, Queens Historical Society, Weeping Beach Park, 143-35 37th Avenue, Flushing, July 26, 2:30 pm, $10 with limited seating.

Photo by New York State Pavilion Facebook Page

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A three-day model train show headlines this week of activities, followed closely by Brazilian, Irish, and Japanese cinema, plus a documentary on the New York State Pavilion. There’s also a “color run” and Greek, Mexican, classical, and doo-wop concerts. Here’s the rundown.

May 20, North Beach, 7 pm. The Greater Astoria Historical Society hosts a lecture/slide presentation on North Beach, a summer resort where LaGuardia Airport is now. $10. QED Astoria, 27-16 23rd Ave., Astoria.

May 20-23, Rebecca Patek, 8 pm. This NYC-based choreographer and performance artist synthesizes dance, theater, and comedy. This performance is loosely based on “The Crime of the Century” — the 1924 murder of Bobby Franks by Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb. $15. The Chocolate Factory, 5-49 49th Ave., Long Island City.

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It was one of the most memorable venues of the 1964 World’s Fair. Designed by legendary architect Philip Johnson, the New York State Pavilion featured the elliptical Tent of Tomorrow, whose 16 100-foot-high reinforced concrete piers suspended a 50,000-square-foot roof of multi-colored panels. The main floor featured a ground map of New York State with 567 terrazzo mosaic panels.

Meanwhile, the Theaterama, located adjacent to the pavilion, displayed art by Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, and the three nearby observation towers boasted elevators leading to high-altitude platforms.