Park Slope Cinderella Project House Transformed Into Sleek Digs Asks $7.495 Million

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We’ve got some eye candy for you today — and an unusual property. At 77 Prospect Place in Park Slope, it’s a striking, light-filled modern townhouse, designed in 2004 by Baumann Architects, that encompasses and extends an 1890s carriage house.

The renovation added a top floor with an open “great room,” and it’s a stunner of a space, with open wood and steel beams, 12-foot ceilings, a front balcony, two sets of double doors that open onto a rear terrace and a continuous bank of windows that rings the top. The house’s current owners — Noel Wiggins, an artist and founder of the Areaware design website, and his wife, Shoshana Perry Wiggins — have held yoga and wellness classes there, according to a Corcoran spokesperson. 

The living room is below, and it’s another looker of a space, with wide plank pine floors, a high cedar ceiling, a textured concrete wall and a 30-foot gap along the wall that brings sunlight down from above.

There’s a bathroom with a glass-walled shower that opens up to a terrace with a hot tub, and another bath that’s beautifully designed with cedar woodwork, a concrete sink counter, purple tile and exposed original brick.

There’s a kitchen with a Wolf range, an extra-wide SubZero fridge, a center island and a window bank that includes a panel of glass bricks.

Oh, and there are four outdoor spaces, including a lovely back garden, a roof deck, and the aforementioned terrace and balcony.


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So, you could say there’s a lot to like here. A lot of space too, with the house’s 30-foot width: there are three bedrooms, four baths, a rec room, an office, a laundry room, and a lot of closet space. (The rec room and office are windowless, so if you’re looking for a negative, there you go.)

One last thing about this house — it’s got an interesting history. As Suzanne Spellen outlines in this Building of the Day post, it was bought along with two adjoining buildings in 1972 by Brooklyn Union Gas as part of its Cinderella Project, which involved buying and rehabbing vacant brownstones — “a defining moment in the history of brownstone renewal,” says Spellen.

The gas company rigged the house up with experimental fuel cells on the roof, air-conditioner-like units inspired by NASA technology that were supposed to produce energy with only CO2 and water vapor as byproducts. Apparently it failed to revolutionize home energy, or, as Spellen notes, we might have them on our rooftops right now.

Anyway, the house is listed by Paul Gavriani and Vincent Falcone of Corcoran. The ask: $7.495 million. A sight more than the $1.53 million it went for in 2003, pre-renovation, but the current structure is a whole different ballgame. What do you think of it?

[Listing: 77 Prospect Place | Broker: Corcoran] GMAP

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

Brooklyn Homes for Sale in Park Slope at 77 Prospect Place

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