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Homeowners don’t quite have the budget to swing a back deck but are hoping to at least build steps to the yard. They aren’t sure what the cost range might be for wood and steel stairs and are hoping for some advice. What should they budget for the project?

Please chime in with your advice.


Need a professional opinion? Try Brownstoner Services, where you can talk to a concierge (it’s free) or browse our community of pros. >>


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The last World’s Fair was hosted in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in 1965 and was themed “Peace Through Understanding.” Millions of visitors attended the fair to explore the countries that were represented from around the world.

Now, more than 50 years later, the fair is being reimagined as “The World’s Fare” at CitiField on April 28 and 29. The World’s Fare will be a grand celebration, advocating diversity through food and drink, music, dance, art installations and even sumo wrestling.

worlds fare

Citifield. Photo by Groupe Canam via Wikimedia Commons

More than 100 vendors representing over 100 cultures will come together in New York City’s most diverse borough. There will also be an international beer garden serving craft beers from around the globe.

The food has been curated by leading chefs and tastemakers including co-chairs chef Claus Meyer, Asian street food maven KF Seetoh and African food expert Dr. Jessica Harris.

worlds fare

Falansai. Photo by @brandtree

One dollar of every ticket sold will go to the Melting Pot Foundation USA, which operates the Brownsville Community Culinary Center in Brownsville, offering accessible healthy food and career training in the culinary arts.

The World’s Fare is a family-friendly event running from 11 a.m.to 8 p.m. on both days. Tickets are being sold for entry for access to vendors and activities as well as to the international beer garden in a separate, ticketed, over-21 area. Tickets will sell out and are currently available now. For more information or to purchase tickets, click here.

This home in Park Slope’s historic district is one of a group of three designed in 1892 by architects Heins & LaFarge. Located at 488 4th Street, it’s Neo-Georgian in style, with some Queen Anne and Romanesque Revival features. There are two-story bay windows, an oval stained glass window on the second floor and a stone band that runs along the top of the first-floor windows and front entrance.

Currently set up as an owner’s triplex with a small garden level studio rental, the four-story home has lush original details inside, including stained glass bay window transoms, colonettes and a whopping seven decorative fireplaces.

Three of those mantels are on the parlor floor, including one in the large eat-in kitchen, which has a center island, built-in shelves, exposed brick and sliding pocket doors that open out to the rest of the main living area. Hardwood floors can be found throughout, and the kitchen looks out on a deck with enough room for a seating area and stairs that lead down to the garden.

Save this listing on Brownstoner Real Estate to get price, availability and open house updates as they happen >>

Custom built-in shelves can be found in one of the bedrooms in the triplex, with walk-in closets found in two more. The one bathroom pictured — one of two full baths in the triplex — has an oval clawfoot tub and a skylight, one of four in the home. Washer and dryer can be found on the top floor as well.

The rental unit is refurbished, according to the listing, and is small, with a living area, kitchen and sleeping alcove in the back. There is garden access that is shared with the triplex above. Unusually for Brooklyn, there is no cellar and the mechanicals are located on the garden level.

Located on a picture-perfect Park Slope side street, the home is sufficiently removed from the hubbub of nearby Methodist Hospital but up the block from the John Jay Educational Campus. Very close to 7th Avenue’s commercial offerings, the property is also only a little more than an avenue from Prospect Park.

Halstead Property’s Janice Cimberg, Michael Petrosino and Karen Wolfe have the listing for $3.995 million. Would you buy it?

[Listing: 488 4th Street | Broker: Halstead Property] GMAP

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

brooklyn homes for sale park slope 488 4th street

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With three exposures and a side walkway on an extra-wide lot, this townhouse at 221 19th Street in Greenwood Heights is bright and could well date from before the Civil War. A recent renovation with high-tech mechanicals and other comforts has brought it into the 21st century.

Some of the nicest elements of the recent renovation are those that aren’t immediately visible. Those include central air conditioning, an instant-on hot water system, and wiring for FIOS, Spectrum and CAT-6 throughout.

The plumbing and electric are new, and the house feels solid and quiet thanks to a cork layer under every floor and insulation in all the interior walls and ceiling cavities. There are 4.5 bathrooms and plenty of storage throughout.

The single-family is set up with all the entertaining rooms on the garden floor, with two floors of bedrooms above. A large open space holds a living room, dining room and new kitchen.

The kitchen has an abundance of counter and storage place, all surrounding a handy island for food prep and casual meals. The kitchen windows overlook a large backyard with a productive fig tree.

The second floor has a full bath and three bedrooms, any of which could be used as a study, play, or workout area. The largest of the bedrooms on this floor, which is currently deployed as a home office, has sliding double doors. The second largest room makes a nice children’s play area, with large windows and lots of closet space for storage.

There are three more bedrooms on the top floor, including the master bedroom, which has its own en-suite bathroom, as well as a huge walk-in closet.

Greenwood Heights is named for one of the largest green spaces in New York City, beautiful and historic Green Wood Cemetery. The house is close to the R train at Prospect Avenue and within biking or walking distance of Industry City.

Check it out in person at an open house this Saturday, April 14 or Sunday, April 15 from 2 to 4 p.m. Listed by James Kerby of Douglas Elliman, the home is asking $2.495 million.

[Listing: 221 19th Street | Broker: Douglas Elliman] GMAP

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Editor’s note: This story originally ran in 2011 and has been updated. You can read the previous post here.

This grand house at 235 Clinton Street was built in the 1840s for the wife of Captain Isaac Brewer, a merchant marine sea captain who became quite wealthy on the high seas. The house, like many others on Clinton Street, and the surrounding neighborhood, was in the Greek Revival style, which is characterized by very little ornament on the brick facade.

Like Brooklyn Heights, many of Cobble Hill’s lots are 25 feet wide, and this allows for a spacious interior. Greek Revivals also have tall windows and high ceilings on the parlor floor. The house also has a generous back yard.

brooklyn architecture cobble hill 235 clinton street

Sometime in the 1870s or early 1880s, the homeowner added some zing to the house to make it more current with the building styles of the time. That is when the Neo-Grec pedimented lintels were added at the front door and windows, and the decorative bracketed shelves were added to the parlor windows.

They also bumped out the bays and added the very nice stained glass windows on the Congress Street side of the building.

brooklyn architecture cobble hill 235 clinton street

Throughout most of its history, the house has had a strong connection to the local Catholic church, St. Paul’s, on Warren Street. The first owners, the Brewers, were Catholic, and their daughter, Elizabeth, was very devout and well known in the community for her charitable work for the church.

She was a friend of Bishop Laughlin, perhaps Brooklyn’s most famous Catholic clergyman, and gave generously until her death from pneumonia, contracted on a trip to the Holy Land, in 1890. The Brewers no longer lived at 235 Clinton by that time.

brooklyn architecture cobble hill 235 clinton street

The beloved rector of St. Paul’s in the mid to late 1800s was the Reverend Francis Francioli, who also died in 1890. His nephew, Edward Francioli, who worked for the city controller’s office, lived here from at least 1890 until his death in 1911. The poor man died of a heart attack at the Court Street Station of the Fulton El at the age of 46.

By the time of the neighborhood’s designation as a historic district, 235 Clinton Street was home to the Sisters of Charity, working out of St. Paul’s. They, in turn, sold the house to the current family in 1978.

brooklyn architecture cobble hill 235 clinton street

I would imagine the stoop was removed during the time the house was a convent, but that is just conjecture. Fortunately, whoever did it did not destroy the original entryway to the house, only the stoop. Perhaps someday the stoop can be restored, giving this grand house the entrance it deserves.

[Photos by Susan De Vries]

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Another in a long list of wood frame houses in Flatbush may soon disappear.

New owners of 319 Lenox Road, where a freestanding wood frame house now stands, filed plans to replace it with an eight-story apartment building. It is one of four wood frame houses that remain on the block.

The home was purchased in February by three LLCs as tenants in common — 141 Ml LLC, Hm Briggs LLC and 759 St Nicholas LLC — for $2.365 million, according to public records. It had previously been in the same family for 38 years. (Tenancy in common ownership is unusual in New York but common in California.)

brooklyn development 319 lenox road

315, 319, 323 and 325 Lenox Road

Prolific Brooklyn architect Charles Mallea is designing. The firm is also modernizing 163 Court Street, the Cobble Hill Greek Revival shop front where Book Court used to be, and created a rendering for Bed Stuy’s 410 Tompkins Avenue, dubbed the “Bulgarian Neo-Goth Super-Villain Crack Lair,” that was jettisoned for a more traditional building after an outcry.

The new owners are planning 28 apartments, eight parking spaces at ground level, and terraces on the second and third floors, according to the DOB.

brooklyn development

331-333 Lenox

The sale of the home should come as no surprise: Wood frame houses are falling prey to development all over the borough, and activity is especially intense in Prospect Lefferts Gardens and Flatbush.

On this block alone, the changes have been swift: A generic red brick mid-size tower now stands at 331-333 Lenox, overshadowing the four remaining houses. Two of those houses — 323 and 325 Lenox — were purchased in 2015 by Eastern Lenox Estates 325 LLC. The company filed an application for a permit in June 2017 to combine the two lots and build a seven-story building, which was disapproved in January of this year.

brooklyn development 319 lenox road

319 and 323 Lenox Road

The only remaining holdout on the block is 315 Lenox, which last changed hands in 1978 and has remained with the same owners ever since.

It also stands two blocks from the two freestanding homes at 94 and 100 Lenox Road, which were sold to a developer for a combined $9.95 million. Next door, a new eight-story condo building designed by architect Karl Fisher replaced three similar frame houses at 2100-2110 Bedford Avenue, which were demolished in 2015.

[Photos by Craig Hubert]

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In the News

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The most popular listings on Brownstoner this week include a Colonial Revival in Flatbush, a renovated brownstone in Bed Stuy and a massive freestanding house in Prospect Park South.

Popular listings are scattered across the borough this week, from Carroll Gardens to East Flatbush, and there’s even a Hudson River Valley mansion in the mix. The least expensive of the group is a detached house in East Flatbush at $700,000 and the most expensive a Bed Stuy brownstone at $3.38 million.

Which would you choose?

The Insider: Suddenly Single Designer Redecorates Her Fort Greene Rental for a Fresh Start

When interior designer Lauren Wills’ significant other moved out of their shared apartment mid-lease, her rent instantly doubled. But because she loved the sunny, loft-like space on the top floor of an older multi-unit building, she decided to stay and make it work.

Rendering via Aufgang Architects

Rendering via Aufgang Architects

Affordable Housing Debuts at Key Food in Clinton Hill With Studios Starting at $2,030 a Month

An affordable housing lottery has opened up for 35 apartments in an eight-story building under construction at 325 Lafayette Avenue in Clinton Hill. The site was formerly a Key Food, which will return, the developer promised after a community outcry.


Interior Design Ideas Brooklyn BFDO Architects Prospect Lefferts Gardens

Photo by Lesley Unruh

The Insider: Prospect Lefferts Prewar Gains Dramatic Focal Point, Stylish Baths

Not every renovation is a full-on gut. This three-bedroom apartment, located in a brick and stucco building near Prospect Park, had been stripped of moldings at some point in the past, and its two existing bathrooms were hopelessly dated.


brooklyn homes for sale park slope

Bay-Fronted Park Slope Charmer and Three More to See This Weekend, Starting at $700K

This week, we’ve got three homes in move-in ready condition, and one that remains a mystery. Two have garages, and they’re located in Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Beverly Square East and East Flatbush.

brooklyn homes for sale flatbush 3 martense court

Colonial Revival on Historic Flatbush Cul-de-Sac With Parking Asks $1.995 Million

This two-story Colonial Revival in Flatbush is a renovated early 20th century brick home with original details as well as modern touches. Built in 1915-1916 by the firm of Cantor & Dorfman and prominent Brooklyn developer Charles Goell, it’s located at 3 Martense Court in a row that was previously featured as a Building of the Day.

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