Fort Greene

by
5


Not sure how we missed this one, but according to this month’s Fort Greene Association newsletter, the Carlton Mews project, which includes a row of new townhouses on Carlton and the conversion of two existing church buildings on Adelphi, received Landmarks approval back on January 19th. The FGA, in addition to TIsh James and the Carlton-Willoughby Block Association, all spoke at the hearings in favor of the development, citing its respect for the scale and architecture of the historic neighborhood. The architect of the project is Ken Levenson, though there’s no mention of Carlton Mews on his website.
February 2007 Newsletter [Fort Greene Association] GMAP
A Look Inside the Carlton Mews Church [Brownstoner]
LPC Sends Carlton Mews Back to Drawing Board [Brownstoner]

by
5


We’ve gotten a number of inquiries in recent weeks about the big project at the corner of Myrtle and Clermont in Fort Greene. We posted photos of the lot back in November and a debate ensued about the degree of Fedders-ness of the design. Turns out it’s going to be a 6-story, 93,000-square-foot residential building, about 7,000 square feet of which will be office and retail space; in addition, there will be nine underground parking spots. The project is being done by the same group, BRP Development, that converted the Graham Home for Old Ladies in Clinton Hill. The building, which will consist entirely of two-bedroom, two-bath apartments, is designed by Danois Architects (which, before it does anything else, better redesign its website!) While the rendering isn’t anything to get excited about, the developers get big points for being concerned about contextual design: “The design continues the street wall of Myrtle Avenue at a scale that is consistent with buildings found along the avenue,” reads the website. “In an attempt to delicately intertwine the residential fabric of the neighborhood with the commercial strip, the wall of Myrtle Avenue conspicuously wraps around the corner, locating the residential and the office entrances along Clermont Avenue.”
375 Myrtle Avenue [BRP Development] GMAP P*Shark DOB
Development Watch: 150 Clermont [Brownstoner]

by
9



Fort Greene Park — the borough’s first outdoor recreation area — came into being in 1848 at the urging of Walt Whitman, then editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. In 1858, the park was so heavily used (and showing it) that talk began of building an even larger one to the south. In 1867, with work on Prospect Park proceeding apace, Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux were hired to redesign Fort Greene Park (then known as Washington Park). Their plans, at top, called for a vault to hold the remains of American soldiers who had died on the British prison ships that had been anchored in Wallabout Bay during the War of 1812 Revolutionary War. The Panic of 1873 resulted in only a scaled-back version (bottom photo) being actualized: The observatory and rostrum were omitted and only the foundation for the Martyrs Memorial was built. The revitalized park was still a big hit and led to a construction boom of brownstones in the surrounding area.
Photo from New York 1880: Architecture and Urbanism in the Gilded Age by Robert A. M. Stern, Thomas Mellins and David Fishman.

by
10


A six-story glass, metal and stone residential building is in the early stages of construction on the three-lot property at 118-122 Vanderbilt Avenue in Fort Greene. The architect? Bricolage Designs. This rendering doesn’t look so bad (a little out of place, but could be worse) but we’re more worried about how it’ll look with all the real-life materials.This isn’t Bricolage’s first new design on Vanderbilt, by the way. If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll recall this building going up on Gates and Vanderbilt. On a related note, do you know what the name Bricolage comes from? Turns out that a bricoleur is a person who creates things from existing materials, is creative and resourceful. Wikipedia says that bricolage is the French-language equivalent of “Do It Yourself.” GMAP P*Shark DOB

by
9


FORT GREENE $180,000
191 Willoughby Street (above)
Penthouse studio co-op, 400 square feet, with two exposures, panoramic views and separate office; University Towers building features doorman. Maintenance $349. Asking price $189,000, on market three months. Broker: Rodolfo Lucchese, The Corcoran Group.

PROSPECT CROWN HEIGHTS $265,000
1520 Bedford Avenue
One-bedroom, one-bath condo, 638 square feet, with renovated windowed kitchen and bath, high ceilings and hardwood floors; building features roof deck, laundry and storage. Common charges $222, taxes $0 (15-year abatement). Asking price $265,000, on market one day. Broker: Alan Shaker, The Developers Group
Just Sold! [NY Post]
Photo by The City of New York fom Property Shark

by
10


On Monday, we reported a tip we got about a bunch of fire trucks showing up at the Forte Condo site and rumor of an injured worker. We are sad to report that we just received word that one worker was, in fact, killed. John Martinez, 46, fell three floors to his death at 9:19 a.m. on February 5. A Partial Stop Work Order that has been put in place states that there was “no protection in hoist area on ground floor. Door openings at hoist not secured.” As we understand, work is being allowed to continue on the lower floors. Very sad indeed.
Forte Condos Get Glass — and Firetrucks [Brownstoner] GMAP

by
22


The block of Adelphi between Myrtle and Park is not one of Fort Greene’s most picturesque but one developer is betting that the lack of sexy, modern condos in the area will be enough to lure buyers this close to the BQE. The double-lot new-build — to be called Verdi on Adelphi — will have sixteen units, all of them with outdoor spaces. Except for the two two-bedroom penthouses, the building will be comprised of one-bedrooms. There’s nothing to look at yet, but the price points are interesting: Most of the places are priced between $365,000 and $410,000. We suspect that there will a lot of younger buyers whom this will appeal to.
The Verdi [Corcoran] GMAP P*Shark DOB

by
44


Whether it’s the bonuses or the fact that buyers are tired of waiting for the long-predicted bursting of the bubble, it feels to us like there’s been a perceptible uptick in market sentiment in the last few weeks. We don’t have any hard facts to back that up, but certainly the strong interest in 100 Decatur Street showed that there a ton of buyers out there. The owners of 351 Adelphi Street apparently have figured this out and decided to raise the asking price of their Fort Greene brick house 10 percent. Back when we had it listed as an Open House Pick in October it was at $1,900,000. Now it’s $2,100,000. It’s a great looking house. We shall see.
351 Adelphi Street [Corcoran] GMAP P*Shark
Open House Picks 10/13/06 [Brownstoner]

by
12


The Forte Condo is open for business. Though far from complete, the Ashland Place tower is more than ready to take deposit checks, as evidenced by the temporary sales office on Fulton Street. The B-line apartments (above) are the first to come on the market, though there seems to be a lack of consensus between Corcoran and the developer, Clarett Group, on whether the space is actually a one bedroom or a studio loft. But hey, if you’re willing to shell out the $500,000 asking price for the 707-square-foot, fourth-floor space, we bet they’ll let you call it whatever the hell you want.
230 Ashland Place, Apt. 4B [NY Times] GMAP
Forte’s Law: Doubling Height Every Month [Brownstoner]
From Cheesecake to Condos on Fulton [Brownstoner]
Forte Rising [Set Speed]

by
35


What do you do if you’re an architect looking to sell your charming 2-bedroom apartment in one of the nicer co-op buildings in Fort Greene? FSBO all the way. The approach is nuthin’ fancy — just a blogspot site with the simplest, cleanest design template — but it works. While we’ve got no idea whether he’ll get any takers at the asking price of $685,000 for 950 square feet, we were just excited to see the photo of the common garden (on the jump) that appears to be shared also with the neighboring townhouses. What’s the story with that?
Sunny 2 Bedroom Co-op [141 Lafayette] GMAP