Assessing the Red Hook Flooding


Seems like Red Hook was one of the worst-hit neighborhoods in Brooklyn last night during Hurricane Sandy. The New York Times singled out the neighborhood this morning and reported that the area suffered from power failures, massive flooding, sewer overflow and business damage along Van Brunt Street. Water flooded the basement of the bar and restaurant Fort Defiance, causing tens of thousands of dollars worth of damage. The Red Hook Lobster Pound experienced major flooding too. This morning on Twitter, Greg O’Connell of the O’Connell Organization reported that “water was up three feet in our office at Pier 41″ and that “all ground floor units are completely flooded at all #redhook #redhookwaterfront properties.” And another tweet: “All ground floor businesses at Beard Robinson Stores, Red Hook Stores (FWAY) and Merchant Stores (P41) are compromised for the near future.” Tweets by reporter Josh Robin early this morning reported “Red Hook power off. Abandoned cars litter street. Water has receded,” as well as “Red Hook was scene of severe flooding. It destroyed first floor of building on Conover/Sullivan.” From WMNF News’ Twitter feed: “Overnight water in Red Hook Brooklyn was five feet deep until it receeded this morning. Everything smells and looks oily.” The Times article also mentioned many stayed in the neighborhood throughout the night, showing off “the pioneer spirit” Red Hook is known for. Has anyone heard how local residents are faring this morning? Any updates? Click through for more images from yesterday and this morning…
Power Failures and Flooding Overwhelm Lower Manhattan and Red Hook [NY Times]
Photo via Twitter

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Van Brunt and King Streets this morning, photo via

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“Red Hook Smelling Like A Texaco” photo via

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6 Comment

  • It’s almost surreal, like a science fiction movie, but all too real to those living in it. I applaud the pro-active approach the city took, kudos to the mayor for that, and I know that New Yorkers will be the great people they are when disaster strikes, with help and care for those affected. Hang in there, everyone, and I know you will rebuild, and the city will bounce back. Red Hook residents, and NY’ers as a whole, are tough people.

  • The “pioneer spirit”? You know who probably would’ve sought shelter in a storm if they had it? The pioneers.
    Selfish to stay in dangerous areas and risk the lives of people who have to come save you.

  • Oh, dear god, please someone tell me Ikea is okay?

    Also curious to know if the Red Hook houses were flooded, and if they have power yet.

  • You said it, fultonst. I was down in PA so hearing a lot of Chris Christie’s press conferences and he had it right. He minced no wrds in telling these stupid people to leave (where their local mayors said not to) and then they all had to be rescued.

    Somebody ought to wash that oil slick away with detergent before some busy body at the DEP comes along and declares the area an environmental disaster and vacates everyone.

  • You said it, fultonst. I was down in PA so hearing a lot of Chris Christie’s press conferences and he had it right. He minced no wrds in telling these stupid people to leave (where their local mayors said not to) and then they all had to be rescued.

    Somebody ought to wash that oil slick away with detergent before some busy body at the DEP comes along and declares the area an environmental disaster and vacates everyone.

  • These storms are the new normal . We will be no different than New Orleans.
    We need to give up our addiction to fossil fuels and build levees or kiss the coastal towns of the Northeastern Seaboard goodbye. Sandy the Superstorm turned us into the bobbing Apple.
    People here are resilient but what we need are responsible adults as elected officials rather than folks that pretend climate change doesn’t exist.
    Irene spared the Big Apple but folks upstate dealt with the devastation for months. That was just last year what about next year?