Shiny Affordable Build Planned for Burg’s North 6th St.


Here’s a rendering for a new affordable development coming to 76 North 6th Street, between Kent and Wythe avenues. The description via the architecture firm says: “76N6 is an affordable, multi-family residential building… The seven unit brick building features private terraces, a communal roof garden, and a facade comprised of operable doors set behind custom steel railings.” The architect for the project said the demolition of the building currently on site just started. He didn’t have a timeline for construction; the firm just put out a construction bid. Like the looks of this one?
76N6 Project [Bureau V] GMAP

13 Comment

  • I would not want to live on that block

  • a 7 unit affordable development in northside Williamsburg? there must be a mandate in place here somewhere

  • M1-2/R6A Lite manufacturing special mixed use residential zone

    Wow, 1.95 FAR = 1625SF per floor

    Would have thought you could build a lot more for the neighborhood than just 3 units.

  • Same owner as the corner building (to the left in the above photo), which is scaffolded and about to be converted to an eating & drinking establishment (both floors). There is no mandate for affordable housing here, but it is in the inclusionary zone, so this housing could generate a density bonus for someone, somewhere.

  • PS – at four stories and less than 2.0 FAR, this looks underbuilt to the R6A zoning, which allows up to 60′ and a 3.0 FAR, I believe.

  • This will be good for someone’s tax sheet

  • Are you sure this is affordable, and not just being marketed as “affordable,” which means that the two-bedrooms that are 800 square feet will sell for only $800K?

  • What does “affordable” mean? Affordable to whom?

  • It’s so disappointing to see this rendering. It already looks dated and bears no resemblance to the neighborhood (despite its ever-changing facades). At least if you’re going to try and create a modern building give something tasteful back and make a nod to the legacy of Brooklyn.

    On a side note, this neighborhood has always had a strong street art presence, yet from living near by – there has never been a Swoon or Shepard Fairey piece there, which is comical. This was photoshopped in for a little street cred, I’m guessing.

    If there’s still hope, this is a plea to the architect to do better. You know you can.

  • It’s so disappointing to see this rendering. It already looks dated and bears no resemblance to the neighborhood (despite its ever-changing facades). At least if you’re going to try and create a modern building give something tasteful back and make a nod to the legacy of Brooklyn.

    On a side note, this neighborhood has always had a strong street art presence, yet from living near by – there has never been a Swoon or Shepard Fairey piece there, which is comical. This was photoshopped in for a little street cred, I’m guessing.

    If there’s still hope, this is a plea to the architect to do better. You know you can.

  • wber and I tend to think a lot alike and do here as well. If this really is affordable housing, the developer can sell four square feet of development rights in the inclusionary zone for every square foot of affordable housing constructed.

    I’m underwhelmed by the rendering but have no idea what q_observer means by, “bears no resemblance to the neighborhood.” Should it have aluminum siding? How about re-roofing shingle? There are a lot of different styles in Williamsburg and given what has been built in the past ten years, we might as well embrace (well done) eclectic-ness. The horse has already left the barn.

  • wber and I tend to think a lot alike and do here as well. If this really is affordable housing, the developer can sell four square feet of development rights in the inclusionary zone for every square foot of affordable housing constructed.

    I’m underwhelmed by the rendering but have no idea what q_observer means by, “bears no resemblance to the neighborhood.” Should it have aluminum siding? How about re-roofing shingle? There are a lot of different styles in Williamsburg and given what has been built in the past ten years, we might as well embrace (well done) eclectic-ness. The horse has already left the barn.

    • C’mon… Walk down N. 6th (or N. 7th, 8th, 9th) from Bedford to Kent. Tell me how many stark white metal facades you see, with laser-etched metal mesh and rays shooting out from it? All I’m saying is buildings like the Community Edge, 80 Metropolitan, even The Louver House make an effort to consider color and material as a nod to what is (was) here. There are a few bad examples around of bigger modern buildings but this is by no means the whole.

      Nonetheless I hear ya, I’m all for change and actually enjoy many of the things that are showing up. I guess this one just looks bizarre to me here.