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You won’t believe your ears or your pocketbooks. Queens is about to experience a streak of fantastic, free, outdoor concerts over the next five days. Listeners will be able to bring their folding chairs, blankets, and dancing shoes to Flushing, Long Island City, Queensbridge, and Sunnyside and enjoy everything from hip hop to polka to R&B. George Clinton, Parliament Funkadelic, and the Chi-Lites are the biggest acts, but some performers, such as minimalist musician Florent Ghys (above), are masters of lesser-known genres.

Here is the schedule:

  • The Glukh Polka Band plays polkas, waltzes, and polonaises at Flushing Town Hall on July 12 at 2 pm.
  • Florent Ghys mixes minimalist music with classical forms, musique concrète, and even clapping and hair dryers as part of the Bang on a Can series at Noguchi Museum on July 12 at 3 pm.
  • The Chi-Lites, a group from the 1970s Chicago scene that was inducted into the Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame in 2000, kicks off the borough’s SummerStage series at Queensbridge Park on July 14 at 7 pm.
  • Gerard Carelli & His Orchestra do a wide variety of swing music in Juniper Valley Park on July 14 at 7 pm.
  • George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic, who were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997, bring their unique funk to Queensbridge Park as part of SummerStage on July 15 at 7 pm.
  • Yesterday and Today, a Beatles tribute band, jams near the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows Corona Park on July 15 at 7 pm.
  • Large Professor, a hip hop star from Flushing, and Marley Marl, a hip hop star from Queensbridge, take the stage at Queensbridge Park as part of SummerStage on July 16 at 7 pm.
  • Alí Bello & The Sweet Wire Band perform Latin jazz fusion in Sunnyside’s Bliss Plaza on July 16 at 6:30 pm.
  • Soul Inscribed plays a mix of hip hop, dub, funk, and soul, while Jennifer Cendaña Armas tells diaspora stories as part of SummerStage in Queensbridge Park on July 17 at 7 pm.

Photo by Florent Ghys

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Filipino stingray sandwiches, Hong Kong mango pomelo soup, and Venezuelan patacón are some of the ethnic food options that are available in Queens, the world’s most diverse borough. However, adventurous eaters will now be able to try all of these treats — as well as Colombian arepas, Korean redneck tacos, and Taiwanese popcorn chicken — in the same spot.

On Saturday, Smorgasburg Queens will hold a grand opening at its 7,500-square-foot lot, which is attached to a 10,000-square-foot indoor space, at 43-29 Crescent Street in Long Island City. About two dozen vendors will sell their appetizers, entrées, beverages, desserts, and specialty products from 11 am to 6 pm on a weekly basis.

Though a sister market to the original Smorgasburg in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg, this bazaar will have a distinctively Queens flavor. Joe DiStefano, who gives local food tours and blogs about restaurants, is the curator, and he’s recruited a diverse group of purveyors from such neighborhoods as Astoria, Elmhurst, Flushing, Jackson Heights, Long Island City, and Woodside.

It won’t all be ethnic, though. Tina Stipanovic from Rèst-âü-Ránt (RaR) plans to serve Bloody Mary doughnuts and s’mores with stout, a mix of chocolate insides with a salty crumb finish and stout reduction. Queens Kickshaw will go with a new version of its famous grilled cheese sandwiches. And the Michelin-rated Forest Hills eatery Danny Brown Wine Bar & Kitchen will spin off as Brine by Danny Brown and peddle lobster roll, duck confit, and a brioche hot dog roll.

Photo by Smorgasburg

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The moon just might hit your eye like a big pizza pie, and that just might be “amore.” Tonight, the Federation of Italian American Organizations of Queens will continue Italian Nights 2015, a series of live music and dancing at Astoria’s Athens Square Park that will take place every Wednesday night through August 26.

With a 7:30 pm starting time, attendees can expect everything from romantic crooning to lively dance music to jazz. The schedule follows.

  • Tony Pasquariello performs for those who love to dance and sing along to Neapolitan music tonight.
  • Tino croons Italian favorites from the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s on July 15.
  • Andrea & Friends do Italian pop songs from the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s on July 22.
  • Bruno Macari sings Italian classics while playing the keyboard on July 29.
  • International tenor Roberto Di Roma does old-time favorites from Central Italy with Mario Dispenza on mandolin and Joe Spadaro on guitar on August 5.
  • Filippo & Friends entertain will a diverse array of ditties on August 12.
  • Simona De Rosa sings Neapolitan jazz on August 19.
  • Marty Hroncich & Company close the series with songs and music from the Istria region and the Kvarner area of Croatia on August 26.

Details: Italian Nights 2015, Athens Square Park, 30th Street and 30th Avenue, Astoria, Wednesdays through August 26, 7:30 pm, free.

Photo by Athens Square Park

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George Clinton and Funkadelic highlight a series of free outdoor concerts this week. In addition to the live music, fun-seekers can choose a Colombia flower extravaganza (above), a noncompetitive bike race, a book festival, plenty of movies, and a night market. Here’s the rundown.

July 9, The Cab Calloway Orchestra, 7:30 pm. The Central Astoria LDC’s 2015 Waterfront Concert Series begins with a night of music from the Harlem Renaissance (1930s-1940s). Free. Astoria Park’s Great Lawn, Shore Boulevard between the Hell Gate Bridge and the pool.

July 9, Preview Screening of Boulevard with director Dito Montiel in person, 7 pm. The movie Boulevard premiered to warm praise at the Tribeca Film Festival, but its release was delayed after main actor Robin Williams’s death last summer. Now it premieres on July 10, but it screens at the Museum of the Moving Image the night before with Astoria-born director Montiel in attendance. $15. MMI, 36-01 35th Avenue, Kaufman Arts District.

July 9, Flushing Historical Diversity Tour, 6:30 pm. Official Queens historian Jack Eichenbaum walks and talks about the area’s past and present. $12/$6 for children. Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Boulevard.

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There’s unique. There’s really unique. There’s incredibly unique. And then there’s the new Dance in Queens program at Flushing Town Hall. Over six Thursdays, this six-part lecture-and-dance workshop series will get participants walking, talking, moving, and grooving to Chinese, Mexican, Korean, and Indian music and immigrant experiences.

The fun begins on July 9, when Jack Eichenbaum, the official Queens historian, leads a walking tour through Flushing with an emphasis on observing and discussing the neighborhood’s historic houses and modern day diversity. The rest of the schedule follows.

  • July 16: Queens Chinese Immigration and Dance Workshop with Ling Tang, who will teach traditional ribbon dance.
  • July 23: Mexican Immigration to New York and Dance Workshop with Alberto Lopez, co-founder of Calpulli Mexican Dance Company.
  • July 30: Flushing’s Koreatown and Dance Workshop with Song Hee Lee, who will discuss her personal story from principal dancer at the Pusan Metropolitan Dance Company in Korea to launching her own troupe in NYC. She will also teach sogo chum (small hand-drum dance).
  • August 6: Little India and Dance Workshop with Abha Roy, who will teach kathak, a classic dance form of northern India.
  • August 13: Artists from the series will participate in a “Talk-Back and Tasting” with finger food.

Details: Dance in Queens, Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing, July 9, July 16, July 23, July 30, August 6, August 13, tour starts at 6:30 pm, workshops start at 7 pm, $12/$6 for children.

Photo: Flushing Town Hall

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On your mark. Get set. Go…but not too fast. On July 12, the eighth annual Tour de Queens will take participants on a roughly 20-mile loop that starts and ends in Astoria Park. Basically a rolling parade, the tour rides en masse at a family-friendly pace –about 10 mph — with NYPD escorts, volunteer safety marshals, and occasional stops at intersections to gather riders. This year’s route goes through Long Island City, Sunnyside, Rego Park, Forest Hills, and Corona with an optional rest stop with light snacks and water at Juniper Valley Park in Middle Village.

Proceeds go to Transportation Alternatives, a nonprofit that promotes bicycling, walking, and the use of public transit in New York City.

Details: Tour de Queens, meet in the Astoria Park parking lot off 19th Street and Hoyt Avenue North, Astoria, July 12, 8 am check in, $22.50.

Photo by Tour de Queens

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It’s been an Independence Day tradition for many years.

The Louis Armstrong House Museum kicks off its ninth-annual, three-gig Hot Jazz/Cool Garden series on July 4 with sizzling live music, red beans and rice (Satchmo’s favorite), and sweet tea. The Ladybugs (above), a traditional jazz vocal group known for intricate harmonies, lead the way. With a repertoire that favors music from the 1920s-1940s, all band members sing while each one plays ukulele, guitar, trombone, bass or drums.

Jon-Erik Kellso & Friends will take to the outdoor stage in the museum’s garden on July 18. A trumpeter who started playing in a big band at age 11, Kellso has jammed all over the world with such greats as Wynton Marsalis and The EarRegulars. On Monday and Tuesday nights, he shares the stage with Vince Giordano’s Nighthawks at Iguana on West 54th Street in Manhattan.

The final concert stars Cynthia Sayer & Her Sparks Fly Quartet on August 15. Led by acclaimed banjoist/vocalist Sayer, this classic jazz core pays tribute to Louis Armstrong with an eclectic repertoire that also embraces other musical influences of the 1920s and 1930s.

Plus, the exhibit Red Beans & Ricely Yours: Louis Armstrong & Food will be on display at the house during these shows.

Details: Hot Jazz/Cool Garden 2015, Louis Armstrong House Museum, 34-56 107th Street, Corona, July 4, July 18 and August 15, 2 pm, $18/$45 for series subscription.

Photo by The Ladybugs

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There’s a camp for just about anything these days, but this one is unique, as it’s specifically designed to provide STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)-based education without books.

From July 6 through July 31, Flushing Town Hall will offer LEGO Camp with Bricks 4 Kidz to children (ages 5-12). With full-day and half-day options, each week counselors will present a new design challenge to provoke spatial and critical thinking. The camp’s philosophy is that children learn best when engaging in hands-on, creative, and educational play. The weekly themes will include Amusement Park Camp, Space Adventure Camp, Super Hero Academy Camp, and Robotics.

Details: Lego Camp with Bricks 4 Kidz, Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing, July 6 through July 31, $225 a week for half day or $450 a week for full day or $800 per month to $1,600 per month.

Photo by Flushing Town Hall

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The big news this week is the Macy’s fireworks show, which will happen in the sky above Long Island City on July 4. There’s also plenty of outdoor fun with concerts, movie screenings, and even a beach campfire. Here’s the rundown.

July 2, Outdoor Movies, dusk. The Queens World Film Festival presents independent foreign films. Free. Diversity Plaza, vicinity of 74th Street/Jackson Heights subway stop.

July 2, Beach Campfire, 7 pm. National park rangers organize a campfire. Bring fixings for s’mores, blankets, and beach chairs. Free. Jacob Riis Park, Boardwalk and Beach 169th Street.

July 3, Young Mr. Lincoln, 7 pm. Shown as part of The Essential John Ford, a tribute to the consummate American filmmaker, Young Mr. Lincoln presents a series of minor, mainly fictionalized events examining the U.S. president. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Kaufman Arts District.

July 4, Hot Jazz/Cool Garden Series, 2 pm. The Ladybugs provide the music. The house provides the red beans, rice, sweet tea, tours, and birthday cake in honor of Satchmo’s birthday. The Ladybugs are a traditional jazz vocal group known for intricate harmonies and experimental arrangements with ukulele, guitar, trombone, bass, and drums. $18/$45 series subscription. Louis Armstrong House Museum, 34-56 107th Street, Corona.

July 4, Pilgrimage, 2 pm; Judge Priest, 4:30 pm. Shown as part of The Essential John Ford, a tribute to the consummate American filmmaker, Pilgrimage is about a mother who sends her son to war to prevent his marriage to a woman she doesn’t like. In Judge Priest, Will Rogers plays a noble judge who tries to vindicate the secret father of a girl and change southern prejudices. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Kaufman Arts District.

July 5, The Prisoner of Shark Island, 2 pm; The Grapes of Wrath, 4:30 pm; Judge Priest, 7 pm. Shown as part of The Essential John Ford, a tribute to the consummate American filmmaker, Prisoner of Shark Island is about Dr. Samuel Mudd, the man who unwittingly treated John Wilkes Booth after Lincoln’s assassination. With Henry Fonda, Grapes of Wrath is an adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novel about Depression-era Okies on the road to California. In Judge Priest, Will Rogers plays a noble judge who tries to vindicate the secret father of a girl and change southern prejudices. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Kaufman Arts District.

July 6, Bug Week + Bug Day, through July 11. From 1 pm to 3 pm, take part in insect- related activities. Hold a Madagascar hissing cockroach, observe bees in a hive, make a bee mask. $12-$15. New York Hall of Science, 47-01 111th Street, Corona.

July 6, Lego Camp with Bricks 4 Kidz, through July 31. Each week children (ages 5-12) get a new design challenge that builds spatial and critical thinking and engages them in creative and educational play. Themes include: Amusement Park Camp, Space Adventure Camp, Super Hero Academy Camp, and Robotics. $225 per week for half day or $450 per week for full day; or $800/month to $1,600/month. Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing.

July 7, The Iron Giant, dusk. Outdoor movie screening. Free. O’Donohue Park Performance Space, Beach 17th Street and Seagirt Boulevard, Far Rockaway.

July 8, Live-In Maid, 7 pm. The 17th annual, eight-week Outdoor Cinema Festival includes open-air cinema, music, dance, and food. All films are presented in their original language with English subtitles and every film is projected onto a 40-foot wide screen. Live-In Maid is about a still-elegant divorcée, living in a fashionable Buenos Aires apartment. Her maid of 30 years massages her feet and freshens her drinks, but makes moves to abandon her. Free. Socrates Sculpture Park, 32-01 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City.

July 8, Bridges and Sunsets: Roosevelt Island Tour, 6:30 pm. Official Queens historian Jack Eichenbaum leads a walking tour of the Roosevelt Island bridge and a stroll down to the island’s southern tip, where a new park honors FDR. $20, jaconet@aol.com.

July 8, Italian Nights 2015, 7:30 pm. The Federation of Italian American Organizations of Queens presents outdoor live music and dancing every Wednesday through Aug. 26. Free. Athens Square Park, 30th Street and 30th Avenue, Astoria.

Photo by 20th Century Fox

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One could ponder how such a grump guy could produce such poetic films. But one could also ponder how any human could direct more than 150 movies of such high quality over a lifetime.

John Ford, whose career ran from 1917 to 1965, was the consummate filmmaker who specialized in westerns and creating conflicts between good and evil. But he also liked dramas and pitting order against chaos, nature against civilization, and law against ethics.

From July 3 through August 2, the Museum of the Moving Image will present The Essential John Ford, a tribute series that will screen 20 of the honoree’s films.

First up is Young Mr. Lincoln, a series of minor, mostly fictionalized events that examine President Abraham Lincoln’s character. Other movies include Pilgrimage, which is about a mother who sends her son to war to prevent his marriage to a woman she doesn’t like; Judge Priest, in which Will Rogers plays a noble judge who tries to vindicate the secret father of a girl and change southern prejudices; and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, which stars a grizzled old cavalry captain who has one last mission before his impending retirement: to prevent a new Native American war.

Other scheduled classics are Wagon Master, a western about a Mormon expedition across Utah, and The Searchers, which depicts the star’s quest to find his abducted niece and the Comanche chief who kidnapped her.

Click here for a full schedule.

Details: The Essential John Ford, Museum of the  Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Kaufman Arts District, July 3 through August 2, times vary, $12/$9 seniors and students/$6 children (ages 3–12).

Photo by 20th Century Fox