9402-9420 Wogan Terr. 9404, KL, PS.2

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Row houses
Address: 9401-9421, 9402-9420 Wogan Terrace
Cross Streets: Off 94th Street, between 5th Avenue and Fort Hamilton Parkway
Neighborhood: Bay Ridge
Year Built: 1927-28
Architectural Style: Neo-Tudor cottages
Architect: Unknown
Landmarked: No

The story: Bay Ridge is full of little cul-de-sacs, one block streets and alleyways. A few of them are remnants of old streets cut off by more recent development, or by the highways and parkways that run through the neighborhood. Some, like Wogan Terrace, were created by developers who built this neighborhood up in the teens, twenties and even later. A friend of mine, a long-time Brownstoner reader, brought this block to my attention. And what a find it is. (more…)

324-empire-boulevard-112414

After more than a year of preparation, the Lefferts Community Food Co-op opened Sunday at 324 Empire Boulevard in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. They have produce from Miller’s Crossing and meat from Herondale Farm, according to Brokelyn, which was the first to write about the opening. “Most of their vendors are the same ones Park Slope Food Coop uses so we expect the selection to be pretty similar once they’re fully up and running,” said Brokelyn.

Prospect-Lefferts Co-op Opens Sunday With Open Shopping Day [Brokelyn] GMAP
PLG Food Co-op Opening Soon [Brownstoner]
Photo by Lefferts Community Food Co-op

155 st nicholas avenue bushwick 112014

This semi-attached wood frame at 155 St. Nicholas Avenue in Bushwick has virtually no original details save the staircase and appears to have last been updated sometime in the middle of the last century. It is covered in faux paneling, linoleum, carpet and wallpaper. We estimate it will need the works.

One redeeming quality is that it has windows on three sides because the lot is 25 feet wide. It’s also in a location near the Dekalb stop and Wyckoff Hospital where demand for rentals is high.

Given the condition, though, we don’t see how the ask of $1,220,000 is justified — unless the plan is to sell to a developer.

155 St. Nicholas Avenue [Fillmore] GMAP

83 halsey street bed stuy 112014

We wrote about the condo conversion of 83 Halsey Street back in 2008. At the time, this third-floor unit was priced at $425,000. Six years, however, is an eternity in the life of a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood so it should come as no surprise that the 745-square-foot pad is now asking $700,000. This apartment is very nice, with original woodwork and a private deck to boot. Plus, the common charges are just $330 a month. There’s an open house tonight from 6 to 7 pm.

83 Halsey Street, #3 [Halstead] GMAP

455 east 18th street ditmas park 112014

We love these whole houses for rent in Ditmas Park, and this seven-bedroom, 3.5-bath gambrel-roofed shingle has a modern renovation with a few original details. There are parquet floors, pocket doors, leaded glass windows and decorative mantels, according to the listing. The kitchen is newly renovated with stainless steel appliances and a dishwasher, and the finished basement has a half bath and laundry. Asking rent is $5,500 a month, which seems like a pretty good deal for 2,600 square feet of house plus a garage. What do you think of it?

455 East 18th Street [Corcoran] GMAP

672-halsey-street-112514

A four-story, eight-unit building at 672 Halsey Street in Bed Stuy has topped out. Next door at No. 670 a similar building — four stories with seven units — is planned but construction has not yet started. Click through to see the rendering. Next door to that at 672, an application has been filed for a four-story, two-family building.

Although all the owners are LLCs with different names, they appear to be related. Located between Patchen Avenue and Malcolm X Boulevard, all three properties have been empty lots for decades.

No. 672 sold in December for $0, according to city records. No. 670 traded two days earlier for $690,000. No. 668 sold in June for $395,000. (more…)

Early 20th Century NYC, Smithsonial Magazine 1

“Professor” Mac Levy, born Max Levy, of Brooklyn, was a self-made man, and one of America’s first fitness entrepreneurs. At the turn of the 20th century, he had made quite a name for himself in New York City and Long Island, and was building his fitness empire, ready to expand to wherever the market led him. As a puny and sickly teenager, he had decided he wouldn’t live that way, and through diet and exercise, especially swimming, calisthenics and weight lifting, he had built himself up into a healthy and strong young man; billed on the vaudeville and speaking circuits as a “young Hercules” and “Brooklyn’s Perfect Man.”

He spent years building up his business by building himself. He was an advocate for healthy living, and coached a curious and eager public through his speaking engagements, vaudeville appearances and through his health clubs. He ran the first gymnasium and health club at the prestigious Hotel St. George in Brooklyn Heights. He also ran summer health clubs at beach resorts in Babylon, Long Island and at Bath Beach, Brooklyn. Other locations followed, as did books, and a line of fitness equipment.

Chapter One of our story details some of his operations and his early days. Chapter Two continues the story of his career, including the would-be mugging on New Year’s Day, 1897, that propelled him into the limelight as a man who take care of himself, with gusto. But for all of the young Professor’s personal and business successes, none of them could propel his name into the history books like his involvement in one of the most sensational murder cases of the early 20th century. (more…)

one john street kitchen 1

Last night, Alloy Development hosted a preview for its multimillion-dollar condos under construction at One John Street in Brooklyn Bridge Park, along the Dumbo waterfront. Although the developer is still driving piles into the mud next to the Manhattan Bridge, there are accepted offers on roughly 40 percent of the condos in the 12-story, 42-unit building, reps told us.

Alloy, which is also designing the project, created a model kitchen and bathroom in its offices at 20 Jay Street in Dumbo. Apartments will range in size from 1,500 to 3,600 square feet and in price from $2,500,000 to $8,000,000. Most of the units are three- and four-bedrooms with three baths, but there are a few two-bedroom, two-bath ones. Sotheby’s has nine listings up.

The demo kitchen featured two islands with Gaggenau appliances, a vented ceiling hood, basaltina countertops, a five-burner gas cooktop, integrated full height cabinetry with pantry and “appliance garage” for concealing toasters and such, and a wine fridge. And we saw a master bath, which was finished with stone mosaic floors, Dornbracht and Fantini fixtures, a glass-walled dual shower, a freestanding soaking tub and double vanity. Click through for more photos.

One John Street [Alloy]
One John Street Listings [Sotheby's]
One John Street Coverage [Brownstoner]

(more…)

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At the final Bridging Gowanus meeting Monday night, reaction was mixed to a presentation of findings after a years-long series of meetings about the future of Gowanus, but many residents said they do not want tall buildings.

Some attendees thanked Council Member Brad Lander and the Pratt Institute facilitators, and some said the process was better than they had expected. Others said the process was manipulative and designed to build a false appearance of consensus in favor of a rezoning that would allow luxury high rise buildings in exchange for much-needed infrastructure improvements that should be made anyway.

About 100 local residents and representatives from community groups and nonprofits gathered at P.S. 36 in Carroll Gardens to hear Pratt Institute facilitators summarize findings about sewage infrastructure, the economy, mandatory mixed-use zones, historic preservation, and affordable housing, among other things.

The report and Councilmen Brad Lander, Steve Levin and others acknowledged past rezonings in Williamsburg, Greenpoint and 4th Avenue had favored developers to the detriment of neighborhoods. (more…)

781 metropolitan avenue williamsburg rendering

The White Castle in east Williamsburg closed in September, and now we have renderings of the eight-story rental building that will rise in its place at 781 Metropolitan Avenue. New York YIMBY first spotted renderings of the 81-unit development, 20 percent of which will be affordable housing. The building will have 10,000 square feet of retail, a gym, roof deck and bike storage.

Issac and Stern are designing, and Adam America is the developer. The developer paid $6,725,000 for the White Castle in May 2013, which apparently is still standing, abandoned and graffitied, on Metropolitan between Humboldt Street and Graham Avenue, if this Instagram photo from yesterday is any indication. No new building permits have been filed, but a demolition application was filed last month.

Revealed: 781 Metropolitan Avenue, 81 Units Coming to East Williamsburg [NYY] GMAP
White Castle in Williamsburg Has Closed [Brownstoner]

Renderings by Issac and Stern
(more…)

festive fifth

Park Slope’s 5th Avenue is hosting a holiday festival this Saturday, complete with a tree lighting, Santa Claus and carolers. The fun begins with a tree lighting at 6:30 pm at the corner of 5th Avenue and 3rd Street (in front of S’Nice). There will be free hot chocolate, marshmallows, cookies, brownies and popcorn during the outdoor festivities, which will last until 9 pm. Puppetry Arts and NY Kids Club will present puppet performances and games, and singer-songwriter Amy Miles and carolers from Opera on Tap will perform. And there will be specials and sales at shops and restaurants all along 5th Avenue in honor of Small Business Saturday.

20-22 Lexington Ave, SSpellen 1

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Former James Parson & Co. factory, now loft apartments and the Callidus Guild
Address: 20-22 Lexington Avenue
Cross Streets: Classon and Grand Avenues
Neighborhood: Clinton Hill
Year Built: perhaps 1887, with later alterations.
Architectural Style: 19th century brick factory
Architect: Maybe DeMeuron & Smith
Landmarked: No

The story: Manhattan has, or should I more correctly say, HAD, different areas of midtown that became synonymous for different industries. The 20’s west of 6th Avenue used to be the Flower District, between 35th and 40th Street west of 7th Ave. was the Garment District, and east of there, between the same blocks, was the Millinery and Trims District. There was the Meat Packing District, Tin Pan Alley, where the composers and musical publishers were concentrated, and of course, the Theater District. Brooklyn wasn’t quite as compact, especially after it became a part of New York City, but even here, we had certain areas that had a concentration of certain industries. Wallabout was a food and candy manufacturing district, for example. This part of Clinton Hill was our own shoe manufacturing district. (more…)