413 Degraw Street, NS, PS

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Former stable/carriage house
Address: 413 Degraw Street
Cross Streets: Hoyt and Bond streets
Neighborhood: Carroll Gardens
Year Built: 1892, maybe
Architectural Style: Romanesque Revival, possibly with later alterations
Architect: J. J. Gallagher, mason
Landmarked: No

The story: In December of 1892, James Lumas applied for and received a permit to build a two story stable here at 413 Degraw Street. Mr. Lumas must have been local, but his name never appears in the Brooklyn papers again. No. 413 is listed as his address on the permit. Whoever he was, and wherever he lived, he paid for a really nice stable and carriage house. The mason used on the job is also listed on the permit: J. J. Gallagher. We’ll probably never know if Gallagher designed the stable, or used a plan from a book, but wherever the design came from, it’s a nice piece of work. The stable has an apartment above it.

The building is a Romanesque Revival style building, with Colonial Revival details. It has the arched Romanesque windows and door, but the brick cornice and other brick trim make it much more Colonial Revival looking. According to the permit the building was to be constructed with a wooden cornice, but that is either gone, or never happened. It looks like the entire building got a Colonial Revival facelift in the first third of the 20th century, and lost the cornice to decorative brickwork, which also surrounds the arched windows and door. But then again, this could all be original. Because this building’s construction date is a mystery. (more…)

285 kent avenue williamsburg

A story in Gawker today confirmed the exact addresses of three buildings Vice Media is taking over as it expands its multimedia empire in Williamsburg, and yes, as suspected, Glasslands (as well as Death by Audio and a handful of other businesses) is being displaced. Williamsburg institution Glasslands, a once hidden and illegal performance space that later went legit, announced yesterday its last show will be New Year’s Eve.

The addresses are 285-289 Kent Avenue, pictured above, and two buildings at 49 South 2nd Street. Gawker found mention of the deal and the exact addresses in an interview with the broker that ran in the Commercial Observer in September. When Vice’s expansion was first announced, the exact addresses of the buildings were not given, although we speculated that 285 Kent was one.

It’s nothing new for gentrifiers to displace gentrifiers, and Glasslands is one of a long list of quirky Williamsburg businesses to shut in recent months.

No One Wants to Say It, But Vice Is Displacing Brooklyn Institutions [Gawker]  GMAP

474 Sterling combo

The renovation at this carriage house at 474 Sterling Place is idyllic as far as we’re concerned, with a factory loft-style ground floor and 19th century rooms above. There are cement floors and a sloping ceiling with a skylight, beams, and tin in the big living area (which could also be used as an artists’ studio or showroom). Upstairs the 19th century rooms are genuine, with original moldings and a cozy, charming feel.

It’s set up as a one family with parking and living on the ground floor. Upstairs, the three bedrooms and two baths are arranged around a common sitting room, which we’re guessing is close to the original setup. Curbed, which was the first to feature the listing, didn’t care for the exterior, but we like the striped brickwork and stable-style doors. The location is also good, close to Prospect Park.

The ask of $2,790,000 makes it one of the most expensive townhouses in Crown Heights, and will set a record if it flies. Do you think they’ll get it?

474 Sterling Place [Ideal Properties] GMAP

39 Plaza Street West combo

This new listing at 39 Plaza Street West in Park Slope has a lot going for it. Three exposures with crazy views towards Manhattan, lotsa prewar cred (Candela!) and a head-to-toe renovation. The new kitchen is very nicely done, though the fixtures in the bathroom are trying a little too hard to be modern. The two-bedroom pad has a monthly maintenance of $1,712 and is asking $1,350,000. You like?

39 Plaza Street West, #10C [Corcoran] GMAP

780 Greene Combo

This one-bedroom rental on Greene Avenue near Lewis Avenue in Bed Stuy has a few nice details, such as two mantels, original moldings around the windows, and hardwood floors. Though it is near Lewis Avenue it is quite a walk to the Utica Avenue A train stop and at least a 10 minute walk to the Kosciuszko J/Z stop. What do you think of it for $1,650 a month?

780 Greene Avenue, #3 [aptsandlofts.com] GMAP

577-jefferson-dext-102214

Dixon is finishing up construction and started leasing another group of properties in Brooklyn, most of them in Bed Stuy and Bushwick. We toured three of them, all in Bed Stuy, and found Dixon is getting faster and better at renovation.

Most of the renovations will be completed in less than a year. Some of the properties had severe water damage, requiring extensive work ranging from gut renovation to replacing some or all structural components such as joists and beams. Dixon is using contractors with experience restoring townhouses in Brooklyn and Harlem, such as All Renovation. Dixon managers oversee each site. An in-house designer creates a unique plan for every house and specs and sources all components, finishes and appliances before construction starts, which speeds things along.

We were impressed with the creative and appropriate use of finishes in each townhouse. In a narrow Romanesque Revival townhouse at 513 MacDonough (pictured after the jump) that had been covered with faux panelling and laminate flooring over the years — all of that was ripped out — an oak plank veneer (a new product engineered to withstand moisture) was used to impressive effect on a kitchen island and on a wall in a bathroom.

The quality of the bathrooms, kitchens, closets and other features was already high, but now is even better in the properties we saw. Dixon townhouses now typically have en-suite bathrooms for every bedroom and extensive closet and pantry systems with built-in shelves. One house even had two laundry rooms. They all have landscaped yards and often decks with huge, custom made floor to ceiling windows that open like doors. Two of the houses we saw this time had Aga Legacy stoves, which retail for around $6,000. An extremely luxurious all-marble bathroom at 14 Monroe spanned the width of the house in front and had both a clawfoot tub and shower.

Dixon has also done work to preserve the historic exteriors of the houses, such as redoing the limestone and brownstone facades and ironwork. At 14 Monroe, pictured below, the original 19th century ironwork was missing, and Dixon reproduced it using a mold from a neighbor, who had already restored his own. (more…)

608 Franklin Avenue

ODA Architecture has designed a boxy, glassy building – with multi-paned windows somewhat reminiscent of an old factory building — to replace the brewery at 608 Franklin Avenue in Crown Heights.  New York YIMBY was the first to publish the rendering.

The specifics of the plans have changed slightly: The building, which will be quite large and take up much of the block between Bergen Street and Dean Street, will rise to eight stories and have a total of 130,00 square feet. There will be 120 rental units — studios, one and two bedroom units. Twenty percent of the units will be income-restricted, according to NYY. The mixed-use building will have 19,000 square feet of retail space.

The development will replace three rundown, low-rise structures on the Dean Street side of the property, not the 19th century brick brewery building on Bergen (as we’ve previously mentioned). The corner lot also has 141 feet of frontage on Franklin Avenue.

While the design reminds us of buildings in the Ladies’ Mile area in Manhattan rather than Crown Heights, it strikes us as a far cry above the majority of new construction. What do you think of it?

Revealed: ODA’s 608 Franklin Avenue, Crown Heights [NYY]
Eight Story Mixed-Use Building to Replace Part of Crown Heights Brewery [Brownstoner] GMAP
Rendering: ODA Architecture via NY YIMBY

626 Flatbush Avenue1

Construction has been moving quickly at 626 Flatbush Avenue since a judge lifted a temporary restraining order in June. About 12 stories have risen so far at the building, which will be 23 stories when complete.

The as-of-right development by Hudson Companies will have 254 rental units — 51 of them, or about 20 percent, will be affordable. The project will have 250,000 square feet of space, including about 4,000 square feet of retail. The project is expected to be completed in early 2016. Click through to see a rendering.

626 Flatbush Coverage [Brownstoner] GMAP
Rendering by Marvel Architects
(more…)

1-flatbush-avenue-102214

Slate Property Group plans to build a 19-story tower with 157 apartments at the very prominent corner of Flatbush and Fulton in Downtown Brooklyn, according to a new building application filed yesterday. The photo above shows the triangular shape of the lot, now occupied by a partly empty one two-story commercial building. (Five Guys has replaced Sleepy’s.)

The new building will have a total of 160,000 square feet of space, including more than 123,000 square feet for apartments. Twenty percent of the apartments will be affordable, and the building will most likely be a rental, according to New York YIMBY, which first spotted the new-building application.

That leaves 20,000 square feet for retail. Goldstein Hill & West Architects are the architects of record on the permit. In December 2012, an LLC associated with Capstone Equities bought the property from Kansas Fried Chicken for $14,250,000, according to public records.

We think a tall mixed-use building at this location, the entrance to the Fulton Mall, makes a ton of sense. We hope it will be an attractive one.

Permits Filed: 19-Story Building at 1 Flatbush Avenue [NYY]
Photo by Scott Bintner for PropertyShark

284-290 Stuyvesant Ave, CD Brazee for LPC 1

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Row houses
Address: 284-290 Stuyvesant Avenue
Cross Streets: Jefferson and Hancock streets
Neighborhood: Stuyvesant Heights
Year Built: 1880-81
Architectural Style: Neo-Grec
Architect: Builder James P. Miller
Landmarked: Yes, part of Stuyvesant Heights Expansion HD (2013)

The story: Stuyvesant Heights was first developed just before the Civil War as a suburban retreat for the wealthy brewers and businessmen who were making their fortunes in Bushwick. They, in turn, attracted other wealthy men from downtown and elsewhere who wanted to live in splendid isolation on large lots with garden space, but still easily commutable to their businesses in Manhattan or on Brooklyn’s piers. That ease of commute was provided by the excellent facilities that ran along Fulton Street and Atlantic Avenue. By the 1870s, developers began dividing up the remaining Stuyvesant Heights plots. In the space of 30 years, the mansions and villas were surrounded by, or replaced by, row houses. The big city had reached Stuyvesant Heights. (more…)

11-greene-avenue102114

An unnamed real estate firm is setting up shop at 11 Greene Avenue, a worker inside told us when we stopped by recently. This is in one of the 19th century storefronts in three Italianate row houses near the intersection of Fulton Street in Fort Greene.

Unfortunately, the new cement window surround looks out of place, but at least it didn’t replace anything historic. The retail space, previously the longtime home of Jessy’s House of Styles unisex salon and barbershop, had a modern metal facade. GMAP

Update: A Corcoran spokesperson just confirmed this will be Corcoran’s sales office for the Lefferts Place Mews condos in Clinton Hill.

918 President StreetCombo

The house is grand and so is the asking price. This two-family brownstone at 918 President Street in Park Slope offers a sweep of original detail, including blockbuster fireplaces and parquet floors. The renovation looks expensive, although we could do without the tile floor in the bathroom and the massive cabinetry in the kitchen.

It’s set up as a fourplex over a rental (the house is actually five stories, although the topmost one is hidden). All the mechanicals were updated in 2003, including five-zone central air. It’s also half a block from the park. Do you think it will sell at $5,250,000?

918 President Street [Brown Harris Stevens] GMAP