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Brookland Capital is planning more Crown Heights apartments — and this latest batch will be at 1312 Lincoln Place in Crown Heights north, close to Eastern Parkway. We agree with YIMBY, which first published this rendering, that the parking at street level is unfortunate — but required by code.

Otherwise, this building looks decent to us, and seems to have an interesting, or at least unusual, pearlescent or metallic green-gray finish. We like the geometric pattern of the color blocked panels. The stepped upper stories relieve what could otherwise be a too-massive structure, and the fringe of greenery at the top further softens the lines. (more…)

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The striking infill going up at 443 Bergen Street in Park Slope — a sliver of a Passive House with a solar panel covering most of the facade — is still under construction. From the outside, not much appears to have changed since we checked it out in May. Construction was supposed to wrap last summer, according to the construction fence, so we assume they’ve been busy finishing the interior.

The solar panel — which some commenters said is more style than substance since it would catch more energy on the roof — dominates the house. There is also some raw-looking wide wood cladding, windows, and a little bit of stucco.

We wouldn’t want every house in Brooklyn to look like this, but here we think it’s an interesting contrast with the surroundings. We also like the stepped massing at the top, and the overall navy-white-wood color scheme — it’s jaunty. Click through to see more photos.

Passive House Condos Nearly Finished on Bergen Street in Park Slope [Brownstoner]

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345 Carroll Street - Rooftop

The bluestone-clad luxury condos at 345 Carroll Street in Gowanus are 70 percent sold (in contract, that is), according to reps from developer Sterling Equities. Workers are still driving piles at the former Regency Carts site, but the pit between Hoyt and Bond Streets will eventually become 32 condos, 18 of which will have outdoor space. (more…)

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The scaffolding came down a few weeks ago, revealing the new condo building at 440 Atlantic Avenue that has been in the works for several years. The condos from Barrett Design and Development replaced two greatly altered 19th century row houses. As regular readers may recall, sales launched in April, and there no units left. Click through to see a shot of the building from a different angle, from a tipster. How do you like the way it turned out?

440 Atlantic Avenue Coverage [Brownstoner]

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150 richardson street interior 1

Since empty lots and industrial properties near the BQE seem to be the final frontier of Williamsburg real estate, yet another condo building has hit the market there at 150 Richardson Street. The factory-inspired eight-unit development currently has three condos up for grabs, with one-bedrooms starting at $949,000.

The cheapest one-bedroom, #2B, clocks in at 727 square feet with a 155-square-foot balcony. (That’s works out to $1,075 $1,305 per square foot, for those of you keeping score at home.) The next one up is #2A, a similarly sized one-bedroom topped with a 327-square-foot private roof deck asking $989,000. And the priciest listing so far is #4A, a duplex two-bedroom with 964 square feet of interior space and a 381-square-foot roof deck that wants $1,395,000.

Christopher Papa Architects designed the project, which sports arched windows, exposed reclaimed brick “from a carriage and buggy factory,” exposed concrete columns and antique oak hardwood floors. Black Diamond Group developed it, and Withers & Grain handled the interiors. We think the finishes are appealing, if fairly typical for Williamsburg condos — blue shaker-style cabinets, quartzite counters, white subway-tile bathrooms. What’s your opinion of the look and the pricing?

150 Richardson Street Listings [StreetEasy] GMAP
150 Richardson Street [Official]
Renderings, Floor Plans, Teaser Site out for Small ‘Burg Condo Building [Brownstoner]

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285 grand street williamsburg rendering

The Passive House condo craze has come to Boerum Hill, Prospect Heights, the Columbia Street Waterfront and now Williamsburg. We discovered this design for four stories of eco-friendly condos at 285 Grand Street on the website of developer Blue Zees.

There will be two large apartments spread across 5,416 square feet of residential space, in addition to 4,600 square feet of retail, according to building applications disapproved last week. And a restaurant will occupy the ground floor, according to Schedule A filings.

David Berridge Architect will design the project. It looks like the facade will be clad in metal siding, a feature we’ve come to expect on Passive House buildings. Both condos will have terraces, and the upper unit will be a duplex with double height windows. Blue Zees paid $2,850,000 for the property in 2012, and demolished a one-story garage last year.

What do you think of the design?  GMAP

 

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Apartments at the 32-unit development at 345 Carroll Street first went on sale last September, and more than half are now spoken for. This two-bedroom on the fourth floor is still available. The interiors of this building are very nice in our opinion — definitely a step up from your typical new construction finishes. Of course, that’s reflected in the price: $1,695,000 for 1,261 square feet comes out to almost $1,350 a foot.

345 Carroll Street, #4D [Stribling] GMAP

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As the building boom continues, more cases of shoddy new construction are coming to light, some the result of unseasoned, inexperienced developers, according to The New York Times. The story dove into problems at two buildings in particular, 500 4th Avenue (above) and 550 Grand Street.

At the former, a big new condo building, the cement cracked off the facade and balconies developed alarming cracks three years after opening. At the latter, a condo conversion of a 19th century brick building in Williamsburg, the roof leaked, the storm drainage system was not hooked up to the sewer system so the building frequently flooded, and “fire stopping measures” were missing.

The story mentioned two developers who have been named in lawsuits for construction defects in more than one building: Isaac Katan and Shaya Boymelgreen. It also recounted the travails of condo buildings that try to hold developers or sponsors accountable, and said ongoing litigation may make it difficult to sell.

Would you buy in new construction?

Construction Defects Follow a Brooklyn Building Boom [NYT]
Balconies Unsafe, Structural Problems at New Build on 4th Avenue [Brownstoner]
Photo by Nicholas Strini for PropertyShark

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The Brooklyn Children’s Museum is getting pushback from employees and pols over growth plans they say are cutting out longtime local, black supporters — in particular, its plan to open an outpost in One John Street, one of the very swanky new condo buildings going up in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Higher admission fees (they have nearly doubled, from $5 to $9) are also unpopular, reported The New York Times, and the racial diversity of the staff has declined dramatically, among other things. Here’s a sample snippet:

“How are you going to service there when you can barely staff your own building?” said Anne Smith, a former public relations manager at the museum. “Why has there never been a satellite office for black communities, Hispanic communities?” Ms. Smith complained that an administrator had lamented that events at the museum had too much of a “local feel,” and asserted that managers wanted to market to predominantly white, upscale Brooklyn neighborhoods like Park Slope and Carroll Gardens.

The Crown Heights museum, over 100 years old, was hard hit by the downturn in 2008 and is trying to fix its balance sheet. Meanwhile, the demographics in the area are changing, according to census data: From 2000 to 2010, the last year it’s available, whites increased 89 percent while blacks decreased 15 percent, the story said. What do you think the museum should do?

With Expansion, Brooklyn Children’s Museum Is Accused of Forsaking Its Community [NY Times]

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210 pacific street cobble hill 22015

The first of the Passive House condos at 210 Pacific Street in Boerum Hill went up for sale last month, and now the seven-story building is getting its windows. Both the teaser site and the construction fence proclaim, “The future of the City of Brooklyn begins here.”

While we’re not sure about that, the 10-unit building will include sustainable features like an electric car charging station, solar hot water heaters, triple-glazed windows, extensive insulation and energy recovery units. Designed by SBLM Architects and developed by Nava Companies, the building will be clad in custom brass tiles, according to the listing copy (you can see a closeup on the teaser site). We hope they don’t sizzle in the sun.

The development now has three listings online – two three-bedrooms and a four-bedroom — starting from $2,425,000. One asking $2,495,000 is already in contract.

210 Pacific Street [Official]
510 Pacific Street Listings [Brown Harris Stevens]
210 Pacific Street Coverage [Brownstoner]

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This new listing at 535 Dean Street is worth a look even if you’re not in the market. The 2,017-square-foot loft got a serious makeover from the owner, and the result is pretty cool. Of particular note: The giant bookcase and suspended office pod. The high ceilings, huge windows and private balcony round out the offering. At $2,400,000, the ask is well north of $1,000 a foot. The common charges are just $1,365. What do you think of the design?

535 Dean Street, #304 [Halstead] GMAP