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This North Slope brownstone, at 212 St. Johns Place, is stately, spacious and in stellar condition. It’s full of original detail that looks to have been beautifully maintained.

Exhibit A would be the beauteous parlor floor, with its vast pier mirror, bay windows, inlaid parquet floors and original woodwork. Note the wedding cake detailing on the walls and the two-tone paint schemes on the crown moldings.

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It’s a head-turner, but is it big enough to justify the price tag?

There’s no denying the good looks of this beautifully renovated apartment in a circa-1900 brick row house at 521 11th Street in Park Slope. And it has two bedrooms and two baths to boot — a highly desirable combo that’s also exceedingly difficult to find.

However, the setup might be a bit of a squeeze for some.

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Image via Google Maps. Illustration by Brownstoner

Greenland Forest City — the developer partnership behind the Pacific Park mega-development — now wants to build one of the borough’s largest buildings across the street from the Barclays Center, according to Crain’s.

Pacific Park’s behemoth office tower could employ thousands of Brooklyn workers and be as big as 1.5 million square feet, but only if the developer can transfer air rights from the nearby Barclays Center plaza, a triangle of land jutting out into one of Brooklyn’s busiest intersections.

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105 8th Avenue. Photo via Halstead

After languishing on the market for years, the historic Tracy Mansion at 105 8th Avenue sold in 2015 for $9.5 million. Now, its new owner wants to dramatically expand the building and convert it into eight residential units.

After some initial hesitation, Landmarks gave the green light this week for a host of changes that’ll give a new life to this old limestone beauty.

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Owned by a single family for a century, this Gilded Age townhouse near Prospect Park came into modern times with nearly all its original detail preserved.

That’s not to say the new homeowners didn’t have work to do. First they hired Red Hook-based MADE Architecture to, among other things, design new bathroom layouts as well as a new layout and cabinetry for the garden-level kitchen, and to bring the intact but timeworn woodwork to a high level of polish.

Then in came Ensemble Architecture to choose furnishings and finishes, including floor and wall tiles, light fixtures, countertops, plumbing fixtures, wallpaper and paint colors. The Gowanus-based studio, which was founded in 1998 by Elizabeth Roberts and now comprises 13 architects and designers, recently expanded its interiors department.

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A community meeting on the proposed redevelopment of Park Slope’s 5th Avenue Key Food grocery turned into a public roasting of developer Brian Ezra Tuesday night, with an audience of nearly 400 area locals hissing, booing and laughing at explanations for the financial difficulties in creating a new supermarket to meet local demand.

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This classic four-story Park Slope brownstone had been updated by its previous owner, a contractor, who had “already done the big stuff — the kitchen, air conditioning, a security system,” said Jennifer Morris of JMorris Design, a Brooklyn-based interior design studio specializing in finishes and furnishings.

So Morris was able to forget about the function and focus on the fun. Her goal was to create something “textured and expressive.”

“The parlor floor was very much intact,” Morris said, with elaborate original woodwork, mantels and delicate plaster decoration on the ceilings and on friezes running along the top of the 12-foot-high walls. But the plasterwork had been “gunked up” over the years and was hardly pristine.

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This circa-1905 neo-classical four-story, at 848 Carroll Street in Park Slope, is a domicile of distinction, enough so that it is listed in the AIA Guide to New York City. Designed by architect William B. Greenman, it’s “a narrow bay-windowed neo-classical exile from the Upper East Side,” says the guide.

As it happens, an “exile from the Upper East Side” — a breed that’s been crossing the river in meaningful numbers lately — may be exactly who buys it. If not one of those, exactly, then someone else who covets an elegant, expansive home that carries the whiff of old-money privilege — and who can face down a stratospheric price tag.