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This North Slope brownstone, at 212 St. Johns Place, is stately, spacious and in stellar condition. It’s full of original detail that looks to have been beautifully maintained.

Exhibit A would be the beauteous parlor floor, with its vast pier mirror, bay windows, inlaid parquet floors and original woodwork. Note the wedding cake detailing on the walls and the two-tone paint schemes on the crown moldings.

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This massive Greek Revival has an interesting pedigree. The house, at 271 Hicks Street, dates back at least to 1846. And since 1951 it’s been home to the family of architect Herbert Kaufman, a key member of the preservationist group that led to Brooklyn Heights becoming the city’s first historic district.

You might expect a painstakingly preserved home from such a figure, but that’s not the case here. A good deal of original detail is missing from the house, and it looks like it may need some updating.

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This one-family townhouse in Crown Heights has been completely renovated in thoroughly modern style, with contemporary geometric light fixtures, a sleek kitchen and a whole lot of marble.

In addition to being wired up with a home security system, Bose ceiling speakers, master lighting controls and a basement screening area with surround sound, it’s got something not often found in one-family homes: a basement steam room.

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This four-story Italianate brownstone at 163 Dekalb Avenue boasts all sorts of elegant period details and sits on a prime block directly across from Fort Greene Park. Wedding cake plaster decorations, eight working marble fireplaces, and original pocket doors with etched glass are some of the goodies inside.

The condition is somewhat ambiguous — upgraded but perhaps not quite fully renovated, if we interpret the listing correctly.

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This South Williamsburg row house, at 64 South 4th Street, has been written up in both Dwell and Design Sponge, and for good reason. It’s a beaut, gorgeously renovated from top to bottom by Agencie Group architects.

The result is stylish, tasteful and warm, with impeccable rustic-tinged finishes. Features include wide-plank chestnut floors reclaimed from a Virginia barn, tin ceilings, exposed beams, and a glass wall at the rear of the parlor floor.

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This landmarked single-family, at 904 Saint Johns Place in the Crown Heights Historic District, has gotten a nice top-to-bottom renovation, with a good deal of original detail restored. Most notably that includes a lot of unpainted maple woodwork, including door and window frames, fireplaces, pocket doors, wainscoting and a large pier mirror in the living room.

There are modern touches as well — exposed brick, recessed lighting and a modern kitchen. The latter is spacious and nicely done, with white Caesarstone counters and island, a six-burner Viking range and a wine refrigerator. 

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This circa-1905 neo-classical four-story, at 848 Carroll Street in Park Slope, is a domicile of distinction, enough so that it is listed in the AIA Guide to New York City. Designed by architect William B. Greenman, it’s “a narrow bay-windowed neo-classical exile from the Upper East Side,” says the guide.

As it happens, an “exile from the Upper East Side” — a breed that’s been crossing the river in meaningful numbers lately — may be exactly who buys it. If not one of those, exactly, then someone else who covets an elegant, expansive home that carries the whiff of old-money privilege — and who can face down a stratospheric price tag.

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This Neo-Grec Clinton Hill brownstone at 562 Washington Avenue is slim at 18 feet, but with five stories and a large two-story extension at the rear it offers a lot of square footage.

It’s set up with duplexes on the top and bottom, with a floor-through unit in between. So an owner could live in one of the duplexes and pull some decent rental income to offset the mortgage.