10/23/14 9:00am

651 New York Avenue3

Rebar is rising on the site of this 40-unit development at 651 New York Avenue in East Flatbush by developer Eli Karp of Hello Living. After years of developing luxury condos in Prospect Heights and Crown Heights, this project, which the developer is calling Hello New York, is one of five on the other side of Eastern Parkway in Prospect Lefferts Gardens and East Flatbush.

Each unit will have a private elevator opening directly into the apartment and a large terrace. The building will have a gym and there will be 20 parking spaces for the 40 units. Click through for a rendering from the construction fence and a shot of the site.

Hello Living Ventures out to New York Avenue [Brownstoner] GMAP
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10/23/14 8:30am

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Brooklyn’s Real-Life Good Witches Concoct Herbal Brews [NY Times]
Goodbye, My Bed Stuy [NY Daily News]
Number of Homeless Students in Brooklyn Schools Spikes in Middle-Class Areas [NY Daily News]
Lena Dunham Talks up New Book at BAM [Eagle]
Which Fort Greene Brownstone Did Ingrid Bergman’s Granddaughter Buy? [Eagle]
Rescue Me, Fort Greene Edition [Eagle]
City Point’s First Residential Buildings Take Shape in DoBro [Curbed]
Rendering Posted for Alhambra Theatre Conversion [WyckoffHeights.org]
This Is How Brooklyn Got Its Cool [TRD]
Time Equities to Buy Venetian Rentals in Midwood for $27 Million [TRD]
NYC Construction Spending to Hit $100 Billion, Still Below ’07 Peak [TRD]
Bushwick Police Plan Domestic Violence Outreach After Three-Year-Old’s Murder [DNA]

10/22/14 4:30pm

Fence

Newtown Creek Gets $16 Million From a Company That Helped Ruin It [Gothamist]
Brooklyn’s Infamous Bike Kill Has Moved to Parts Unknown [Gothamist]
Odor of Hot Tar From Construction Firm Is Stinking up Red Hook, Locals Say [DNA]
Puppy City, Where the Wee-Wee Pad Was Invented, Closes After 50 Years
[Sheepshead Bites]
Get Your Ghoul on at Upcoming Neighborhood Halloween Parades [DPC]
New Midwood Community Center Celebrates Grand Opening [DPC]
What’s in Development in Crown Heights [Q Parkside]

10/22/14 4:00pm

Ghouls and Gourds

On Saturday the Brooklyn Botanic Garden will host its annual Ghouls and Gourds festival. There will be tons of activities and entertainment for everyone: stilt walkers, giant puppets, crafts (make a potato person and drop him or her off at the Potato People Resort and Spa), live music and more. Children’s book authors will be reading stories and signing their books. The day will culminate with a costume parade at 4:30.

The event runs from noon to 5:30 pm on Saturday, October 25. Tickets are $15. Children under 12 are free. Click here for more details.

Photo: Brooklyn Botanic Garden

10/22/14 3:00pm

413 Degraw Street, NS, PS

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Former stable/carriage house
Address: 413 Degraw Street
Cross Streets: Hoyt and Bond streets
Neighborhood: Carroll Gardens
Year Built: 1892, maybe
Architectural Style: Romanesque Revival, possibly with later alterations
Architect: J. J. Gallagher, mason
Landmarked: No

The story: In December of 1892, James Lumas applied for and received a permit to build a two story stable here at 413 Degraw Street. Mr. Lumas must have been local, but his name never appears in the Brooklyn papers again. No. 413 is listed as his address on the permit. Whoever he was, and wherever he lived, he paid for a really nice stable and carriage house. The mason used on the job is also listed on the permit: J. J. Gallagher. We’ll probably never know if Gallagher designed the stable, or used a plan from a book, but wherever the design came from, it’s a nice piece of work. The stable has an apartment above it.

The building is a Romanesque Revival style building, with Colonial Revival details. It has the arched Romanesque windows and door, but the brick cornice and other brick trim make it much more Colonial Revival looking. According to the permit the building was to be constructed with a wooden cornice, but that is either gone, or never happened. It looks like the entire building got a Colonial Revival facelift in the first third of the 20th century, and lost the cornice to decorative brickwork, which also surrounds the arched windows and door. But then again, this could all be original. Because this building’s construction date is a mystery. (more…)

10/22/14 2:00pm

285 kent avenue williamsburg

A story in Gawker today confirmed the exact addresses of three buildings Vice Media is taking over as it expands its multimedia empire in Williamsburg, and yes, as suspected, Glasslands (as well as Death by Audio and a handful of other businesses) is being displaced. Williamsburg institution Glasslands, a once hidden and illegal performance space that later went legit, announced yesterday its last show will be New Year’s Eve.

The addresses are 285-289 Kent Avenue, pictured above, and two buildings at 49 South 2nd Street. Gawker found mention of the deal and the exact addresses in an interview with the broker that ran in the Commercial Observer in September. When Vice’s expansion was first announced, the exact addresses of the buildings were not given, although we speculated that 285 Kent was one.

It’s nothing new for gentrifiers to displace gentrifiers, and Glasslands is one of a long list of quirky Williamsburg businesses to shut in recent months.

No One Wants to Say It, But Vice Is Displacing Brooklyn Institutions [Gawker]  GMAP

10/22/14 1:30pm

474 Sterling combo

The renovation at this carriage house at 474 Sterling Place is idyllic as far as we’re concerned, with a factory loft-style ground floor and 19th century rooms above. There are cement floors and a sloping ceiling with a skylight, beams, and tin in the big living area (which could also be used as an artists’ studio or showroom). Upstairs the 19th century rooms are genuine, with original moldings and a cozy, charming feel.

It’s set up as a one family with parking and living on the ground floor. Upstairs, the three bedrooms and two baths are arranged around a common sitting room, which we’re guessing is close to the original setup. Curbed, which was the first to feature the listing, didn’t care for the exterior, but we like the striped brickwork and stable-style doors. The location is also good, close to Prospect Park.

The ask of $2,790,000 makes it one of the most expensive townhouses in Crown Heights, and will set a record if it flies. Do you think they’ll get it?

474 Sterling Place [Ideal Properties] GMAP

10/22/14 12:55pm

39 Plaza Street West combo

This new listing at 39 Plaza Street West in Park Slope has a lot going for it. Three exposures with crazy views towards Manhattan, lotsa prewar cred (Candela!) and a head-to-toe renovation. The new kitchen is very nicely done, though the fixtures in the bathroom are trying a little too hard to be modern. The two-bedroom pad has a monthly maintenance of $1,712 and is asking $1,350,000. You like?

39 Plaza Street West, #10C [Corcoran] GMAP

10/22/14 12:15pm

780 Greene Combo

This one-bedroom rental on Greene Avenue near Lewis Avenue in Bed Stuy has a few nice details, such as two mantels, original moldings around the windows, and hardwood floors. Though it is near Lewis Avenue it is quite a walk to the Utica Avenue A train stop and at least a 10 minute walk to the Kosciuszko J/Z stop. What do you think of it for $1,650 a month?

780 Greene Avenue, #3 [aptsandlofts.com] GMAP

10/22/14 11:30am

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Pratt student and Brownstoner reader Matthew Petric has mapped all the buildings profiled in Brownstoner’s Building of the Day series over the years and has very kindly shared with us the link. His tongue-in-cheek title: “Brooklyn, one (thousand) building(s) at a time.”

The map can be clicked, searched by address and, most interestingly, viewed by date (or a range of dates) of construction.

Thank you, Matt, for making our architectural history columns more accessible and showing them from a new angle. The map was created for Pratt class Spatial Thinking, Data, and Design.

10/22/14 10:45am

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Dixon is finishing up construction and started leasing another group of properties in Brooklyn, most of them in Bed Stuy and Bushwick. We toured three of them, all in Bed Stuy, and found Dixon is getting faster and better at renovation.

Most of the renovations will be completed in less than a year. Some of the properties had severe water damage, requiring extensive work ranging from gut renovation to replacing some or all structural components such as joists and beams. Dixon is using contractors with experience restoring townhouses in Brooklyn and Harlem, such as All Renovation. Dixon managers oversee each site. An in-house designer creates a unique plan for every house and specs and sources all components, finishes and appliances before construction starts, which speeds things along.

We were impressed with the creative and appropriate use of finishes in each townhouse. In a narrow Romanesque Revival townhouse at 513 MacDonough (pictured after the jump) that had been covered with faux panelling and laminate flooring over the years — all of that was ripped out — an oak plank veneer (a new product engineered to withstand moisture) was used to impressive effect on a kitchen island and on a wall in a bathroom.

The quality of the bathrooms, kitchens, closets and other features was already high, but now is even better in the properties we saw. Dixon townhouses now typically have en-suite bathrooms for every bedroom and extensive closet and pantry systems with built-in shelves. One house even had two laundry rooms. They all have landscaped yards and often decks with huge, custom made floor to ceiling windows that open like doors. Two of the houses we saw this time had Aga Legacy stoves, which retail for around $6,000. An extremely luxurious all-marble bathroom at 14 Monroe spanned the width of the house in front and had both a clawfoot tub and shower.

Dixon has also done work to preserve the historic exteriors of the houses, such as redoing the limestone and brownstone facades and ironwork. At 14 Monroe, pictured below, the original 19th century ironwork was missing, and Dixon reproduced it using a mold from a neighbor, who had already restored his own. (more…)