brooklyn bridge park pier 6

A judge today will hear a motion to block the city from selecting a developer to build housing towers on two remaining empty lots on Pier 6 in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Neighbors are suing the Brooklyn Bridge Park corporation to require them to perform a new environmental impact study to replace the one that was done in 2005, reported The Wall Street Journal. (more…)

07/17/14 4:30pm

crown heights church 72014

Bensonhurst BJ’s Wholesale Club to Open in September [Bensonhurst Bean]
Brewklyn Grind to Open Next Month on Myrtle Avenue [Fort Greene Focus]
Ecuadorian Street Food Pops up in Dumbo [Brooklyn Eagle]
Here’s Why Your Friends Can’t Hang in Bushwick Tonight [Comic] [Bushwick Daily]
Collectors of Weird Things to Gather at Brooklyn Historical Society [NY Animal]
Paddling Down Polluted Newtown Creek Is Actually Awesome [Curbed]
Completion Finally Imminent: 55 Eckford Street in Greenpoint [NY YIMBY]
Permits Filed: 326 and 328 Bond Street [NY YIMBY]
Brooklyn Waterfront Artists to Open Summer Turmoil Exhibition [NY Observer]
20 Reactions to “Brooklyn Girls” [Bedford+Bowery]
World-Renowned Musicians to Play Concert Series at Our Lady of Refuge [Ditmas Park Corner]

07/17/14 4:00pm

greenpoint pier

Repairs have started on the India Street pier that collapsed in February, and ferry service to Greenpoint could return by next Friday, according to a spokesperson for the city’s Economic Development Corporation. Work is on track to finish by July 26, when the MTA will suspend G train service between Greenpoint Avenue and Court Square for five weeks to repair damage from Hurricane Sandy. (more…)

07/17/14 3:00pm

999 Jamaica Ave, FJLHS, FJL.com 1

Brooklyn, one building at a time.

Name: Franklin K. Lane High School
Address: 999 Jamaica Avenue
Cross Streets: Dexter Court
Neighborhood: Cypress Hills
Year Built: 1936-37
Architectural Style: Neo-Colonial
Architect: Walter C. Martin, Superintendent of Buildings for the NYC Board of Education, and staff
Other Buildings by Architect: NYC schools built between 1928 and 1938
Landmarked: No

The story: Franklin J. Lane High School started out in a much smaller building on nearby Evergreen Avenue. It was housed in the old PS 85 building. By the end of the 1920s, this school, as well as many other high schools throughout the city, was bursting at the seams with students. Local politicians and school officials begged the Board of Ed to at least build an extension, and ground was obtained, but they dithered until at last it was decided that a new high school was needed instead. That was in 1931. (more…)

07/17/14 12:15pm

36 thomas s boyland street bed stuy 72014

As rents in Bed Stuy skyrocket, it’s easy to forget you can still find deals like this three-bedroom, particularly in eastern Bed Stuy and Ocean Hill. The living room seems nicely sized, and the kitchen and bathroom are both recently updated.

There are two large bedrooms and one smaller one, according to the listing. You could also use it as a two-bedroom and keep the third one as an office or nursery. The location is close to the Bushwick border and two or three blocks from the J at Halsey or the J/Z at Chauncey. Do you think it’s reasonable at $1,800 a month?

36 Thomas S. Boyland Street [Halstead] GMAP

07/17/14 11:31am

Sponsored By New York Aquarium.

The New York Aquarium is building a world-class shark exhibit set to open in 2016.

Created By BlankSlate

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that New York is a city of islands. It has 520 miles of coastline — more than Miami, Boston, Los Angeles, and San Francisco combined. Brooklyn alone, projecting outward from the Southwestern corner of Long Island, is mostly surrounded by water: the East River, the Upper and Lower New York Bay, Jamaica Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean.

Three things you might know about the waters surrounding Brooklyn:

1. The waters around Brooklyn are rich with marine life. In fact, they were once, like, buy-a-brownstone rich, with 12-inch oysters and six-foot lobsters.

2. Back when explorers like Giovanni da Verrazzano and Henry Hudson (of bridge and river fame, respectively) sailed into New York Harbor, sturgeon were so abundant that the fish were considered hazardous to boat passage.

3. Today, despite decades of unchecked use, the New York seascape still hosts everything from whales, to seals, to more than 338 species of fish.

Most New Yorkers don’t even think about this rich marine life living just off their shores. The New York Aquarium is trying to change that, helping residents and visitors understand these vital waters, and protecting them from growing threats, including expanded shipping, dredging, overfishing, and energy development.

Back on its feet (or flippers) after Hurricane Sandy, the aquarium is also working on transforming itself for the future, and you can be a part of it. Check out the plans, which include a thrilling new exhibit, Ocean Wonders: Sharks! You don’t have to be buy-a-brownstone rich to lend a hand. Donate today.

07/17/14 10:45am

LIAC Cumberland Ave Clubhs, 1907 BE

In 1900, a small group of rich Brooklyn swells organized this borough’s first automobile club. The automobile was still a novelty at this time; an expensive toy that only a few could afford. The Long Island Automobile Club (LIAC) was founded so these men could get together, discuss the wonders of this new technology, plan road trips, advocate for better highways and most importantly, race their automobiles. Whether they had fine horses, speedy bicycles or the new horseless carriages, wealthy men just loved races.

Part One of this history outlines the first years of the LIAC. The club grew fast, as more and more men bought automobiles. The earliest models were really just carriages with motors. They were open buckboards, some of them, with a steering wheel. They couldn’t go very fast, they stalled out a lot, and riding in one was a dirty and dusty adventure. As the technology improved, and automobiles got better, more and more people began motoring, and the national love affair with the automobile began. The autoists, as the club members were called, led the way. (more…)