Sewer and Water Line Contract: Is it Worth It?

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Topic: Sewer and Water Line Contract: Is it Worth It?

Sewer February 7, 2013 at 11:00 am

Sewer and Water Line Contract: Is it Worth It?

I just got a promotion in the mail from the NYC Water Board offering a contract for Sewer line maintenance and repair (thought a private company) for a monthly fee of $11.    I have a very old townhouse and never had any work done on the sewer.  Is it worth it signing up for this deal?  How often water main or sewer line breaks?  I have a Heat and Air Conditioning contract with National Grid and found it extremely helpful, I wonder if I need to do the same with the water and sewer line.
Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
Thank you.
 

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I haven’t decided yet but am tending to think I’ll take it.  Most of the people I’ve spoken w/ are also leaning that way.

I signed up for it. If the water or sewer lines go on my house, I face an expensive proposition in repairing them. The lines go from my house across a wide sidewalk to the mains running on the opposite side of the the street. I feel the cost of the insurance is inexpensive enough to justfy ending my exposure to the cost of this repair. 

I signed up for it. If the water or sewer lines go on my house, I face an expensive proposition in repairing them. The lines go from my house across a wide sidewalk to the mains running on the opposite side of the the street. I feel the cost of the insurance is inexpensive enough to justfy ending my exposure to the cost of this repair. 

This is great info, did notknow this option was available.  Like you kid, my service main is on opposite side of street.  Will be looking into this as well.  Thanks all!

A lawyer I know has suggested looking into the ‘exclusions’ – maybe even to the extent of phoning to pin down what is actually covered.

This is insurance and not really a maintenance contract. I doubt they will do anything until there is a problem. The exclusions seem big enough to drive a truck through — anything done by you or third parties. It really looks like it just covers old age, which in this City I suspect is a major cause of problems. Not sure about damage from tree roots and the like. Anyway, I signed up online. They said I would receive an email in a couple days confirming. After a week I called and they had no record of me. I had a screen print of the application acceptance but that did not help. The help line person started the process again, along with the 30 day clock before coverage become applicable. I think they are being overwhelmed with applications. 

Here is a link to the AWR’s policy regarding this offer:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/pdf/awr-slpp-terms.pdf

Below is the summary of what is NOT covered under the program:

7. What Repairs Are Not Covered?
AWR will not pay for any of the following:
• Repairing anything that occurred before the 
Effective Date.
• Repairing anything not resulting from normal wear 
and usage.
• Repairing anything caused by You or any third parties.
• Repairing anything in any home that is vacant due to 
renovation, remediation or construction.
• Repairing anything caused by natural acts or 
disasters, such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, 
landslides or sinkholes.
• Repairing anything caused by defective materials 
that have been the subject of a recall or class action 
litigation.
• Repairing any clog or blockage of Your Water Line.
• Repairing any Water Line not connected to DEP’s 
water system.
• Repairing any interior pipes beyond the main shut-off 
valve inside Your Home.
• Repairing any connections and/or extensions to 
the Water Line, such as water lines to sprinklers, 
irrigation systems, pressure-reducing valves or 
back-flow preventers.
• Repairing anything required by any local, state or 
federal agency inspection, unless otherwise covered 
by this Agreement.
• Repairing any openings made in walls, ceilings or 
surfaces inside Your Home for AWR’s independent 
contractor to access Your Water Line.
• Repairing any third party’s water line that is attached 
to Your Water Line.
• Restoring any gardens, shrubs, trees or structures.
• Restoring any sidewalks, curbs, driveways, roads or 
other paved surfaces that are not required by permit or 
New York City Department of Transportation rules and 
regulations to be repaired or restored.
• Moving any water meter at the time of repair, unless 
required by code.
• Relocating any section of Your Water Line, unless 
necessary to complete a repair.
• Updating any non-leaking Water Line to meet code, 
law or ordinance requirements.
• Removing any items necessary to access Your 
Water Line, such as debris, trash, rocks, cars or 
temporary structures.
• Remediating or cleaning any hazardous substance or 
pollutant, such as mold or asbestos.
• Thawing any frozen section of Your Water Line.
• Excavating Your Home’s Foundation or slab in order to 
access any section of Your Water Line.
• Repairing, replacing or cleaning any portion of Your 
Home or its contents that are damaged by leaks or 
breaks to Your Water Line.
• Paying any costs caused by a leak or break in Your 
Water Line , such as lost water costs, relocation costs, 
storage costs or temporary housing costs.
• Paying any damages caused by a leak or break in Your 
Water Line such as lost time, lost use of Your Home 
or its contents or any damages due to any special 
circumstances or conditions.

These 2 seem to be in conflict of each other. But I ain’t no lawyer.
• Repairing anything that occurred before the 
Effective Date.
• Repairing anything not resulting from normal wear 
and usage.

My reading on this is that it just protects the incoming water supply line and NOT the sewer line. The sewer line, from my experience, is the one that usually goes. Anyone else have view on this?

I think it comes down to the risk and your ability to shell out for a big unexpected repair. If there’s a ~1% chance per year of a ~$5k water line break then $50 a year isn’t unreasonable. And if there’s a ~1% / year chance of a $10k repair of a sewer line then $100 sounds OK. If you can pay the bill without a big hardship, then self insuring is OK too, especially if you know the lines have been replaced in the last decade or 2, as opposed to 100 year old lines.
 

That is one of the direct mail marketing, a promotion of every business and products that encourage every potential consumer via email or regular mail. Those offer always comes with a catch, so don’t always be lured for every bait they have, a promise of small amount or free service is their sweet offer together with their sweet promises. Many products do that specially if the service they offer is virtual services or products and that are not tangible. Unlike the business that I know that also offers direct mail service, they are really selling or offering products that always gives consumers benefits, its all about printing, check there at http://www.digiteksf.com/offset-printing-2/, its all about your printing needs.

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